Green Infrastructure Webinar

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Green Infrastructure Webinar

  1. 1. “Humankind has not woven the web of life.We are but one thread within it. Whatever wedo to the web, we do to ourselves. All thingsare bound together. All things connect.”Chief Seattle
  2. 2. Lisa Riegel: Director, NC Natural Heritage Trust Fund Cy Stober: Water Resource Manager, PTRCKyle Laird: Mobility and Systems Planner, PART
  3. 3. Top Five Strengths Community Colleges and Universities Farming and Viticulture Access to Health Care Scenic and Recreational Resources Small Town CharmTop Five Challenges A lack of Transportation Choices Participating in the “New” Economy Abandoned Mills and Employment Centers including strip shopping centers Capitalizing on and Supporting Existing Business Assets Healthy Community Design
  4. 4.  The region’s natural resources, one of its strengths, are frequently threatened. • The development patterns of the last few decades have led to a loss of wildlife habitat, threats to biodiversity, degraded water quality, and increased air pollutants. The economic importance of scenic and recreational resources is often lost in the desire for more development. The Triad is losing working lands (farms and forestry lands) at an alarming rate; and local processing and distribution infrastructure is lacking. • Forty plus square miles (25,600 acres) of farmland are lost per year in the region. Some parts of this developed land are rich with the region’s prime, productive farmland soils. Agriculture is one of the top economic generators in our region
  5. 5. • The built environment shapes how we live, work, and play• Transportation and other “Grey” infrastructure are key• But Green Infrastructure is important too!
  6. 6. Green infrastructure refers to an interconnected green space network (includingnatural areas and features, public and private conservation lands, working landswith conservation values, and other protected open spaces)populations. That is planned and managed for its natural resource values and for the associated benefits it confers to humans. Riparian Buffers
  7. 7. Diverse and healthy ecosystems providemany important services for humans: • clean the air • produce oxygen • store carbon • mitigate flooding and other hazards • protect, filter and recharge water • decompose and detoxify waste • generate soils • provide habitats
  8. 8. Provides food and supports crop pollination;provides timber and other raw materials. Provides habitats and habitat corridors for plants, animals and other species.
  9. 9. Hanging Rock State Park Recreational OpportunitiesMuddy Creek GreenwayWinston-Salem
  10. 10. Open Space and Conservation Lands
  11. 11. The Transformation - $65 million Stream Restoration• Removed 1,100 ft. of cap• Purchased 15 acres of floodplain and removed structures• Riparian plantings on banks for stabilization and shading• Created a Linear Park with alternative transportation• Restored the creed and improved water quality• Significant economic development; revitalization of the area ($300 million+)
  12. 12.  $4 for every $1 invested for ecosystem services*  Increased property values, tourism, health benefits  The Triad’s agribusiness industry generated gross revenues of $768 million in 2011  Timber production in our region produced $124 million in revenues in 2010.  Hunting, fishing, and wildlife watching brought in $52 million in Triad revenue and NC fees/taxes in 2006*A study of the ROI from the LWCF by TPL
  13. 13. No Responses: Not at all aware: 5% 13% Had heard the term, but did not Very familiar know much about it: 19% 63%Familiar Somewhat familiar
  14. 14. 84% Enjoy the outdoors58% Participant in outdoor sports55% Hiker, outdoorsperson49% Conservationist42% Wildlife enthusiast/watcher18% Fisherman and/or hunter7% Other (health advocate,Land steward, animal lover,Pedestrian advocate, gardener…)
  15. 15. 23% live outside amunicipality 77% live inside a municipality 10% Do not own land 17% Own more than 10 acres 47% Own less than 1 acre 27% Own 1 to 10 acres
  16. 16. 35% of rural survey Do not participants use their own participate in On their own outdoor property property for outdoorMore than 10 recreation adjacent to recreation—only 5% of urban miles their home survey participants do so. 48% of urban survey participants usually take part in outdoor recreation 5 or more miles from their homes. Respondents who indicated they do not participate in Between 5 5 miles or less and 10 miles outdoor recreation, live within a city or town.
  17. 17. Green Infrastructure Assets, Features and Uses Total Rural UrbanFloodplains 93% 91% 93%Water supply watersheds 93% 94% 93%Stream buffers 92% 91% 92%Farms and farm products 90% 91% 85%Public open space 90% 82% 91%Clean water for swimming, fishing, boating 90% 85% 88%Places with prime farmland soils 89% 94% 85%Stormwater management 88% 88% 88%Groundwater recharge areas 88% 85% 88%Wildlife habitat 86% 85% 87%Constructed stormwater control measures 86% 85% 84%Lands managed for conservation and biodiversity purposes 85% 76% 86%Outdoor recreation 84% 85% 85%Street and neighborhood trees 84% 74% 86%Biodiversity 83% 82% 83%Forests/woodlands and forest products 83% 79% 83%Rare species 77% 71% 76%Invasive species 75% 74% 76%Outdoor educational opportunities 71% 71% 69%Mining natural resources such as fossil fuels, minerals and ores 55% 47% 53%
  18. 18. Concepts in the Management of Green Infrastructure Total Rural UrbanProtection of drinking water supplies 99% 97% 98%Parks, public trails and greenways 96% 91% 95%Conservation of significant natural features 94% 94% 92%Using trees & other methods to lessen heat extremes & reduce energy expense 93% 85% 95%Conservation of agricultural working lands 92% 97% 92%Protection of important stream/river headwaters 91% 88% 88%A regional green infrastructure network of agricultural & natural lands & waters 90% 85% 90%Reduction of surface stormwater runoff entering streams directly 90% 82% 88%More ag.- & small- business friendly environment to support working lands 87% 88% 88%Protection of connected natural landscapes & conservation of wildlife corridors 87% 82% 86%Assisting landowners in natural resources management 86% 79% 83%Encouraging new development where infrastructure & utilities currently exist 86% 88% 85%Conservation of species diversity 80% 74% 79%Having outdoor recreation opportunities within walking distance of your home 79% 50% 85%Guidelines for non-ag development in areas of prime soils & land in agriculture 76% 74% 73%Restricting non-ag development in areas of prime soils & land in agriculture 74% 74% 72%Encouraging development & extending urban services & utilities into rural areas 28% 26% 26%The extraction of materials by mining, dredging and quarrying 27% 32% 23%The extraction of fossil fuels in North Carolina 25% 29% 19%
  19. 19. 32% Government employee17% Educator16% Retired15% Environmental Professional15% Business owner11% Engineering/Design Professional9% Land-use planner8% Farmer7% Health care professional3% Forester1% Elected official1% Real Estate/Dev. Professional16% Other (nonprofit, volunteer, student, horticulturalist, housewife, writer…)
  20. 20. Land-Of-Sky COGLinking Lands Model
  21. 21.  Uses GIS assessments which identify, evaluate and prioritize important natural resources required to maintain healthy and sustainable ecosystems
  22. 22.  Uses GIS assessments which identify, evaluate and prioritize important natural resources required to maintain healthy and sustainable ecosystems Guidance and templates • NCDENR:  Conservation Planning Tool  Green Growth Tool Box
  23. 23.  Uses GIS assessments which identify, evaluate and prioritize important natural resources required to maintain healthy and sustainable ecosystems Guidance and templates • NCDENR:  Conservation Planning Tool  Green Growth Tool Box • Land of Sky Regional Council:  Linking Lands Project Three primary assessments: • Water Resource Services • Agricultural • Biodiversity/Wildlife Habitat
  24. 24.  Uses GIS assessments which identify, evaluate and prioritize important natural resources required to maintain healthy and sustainable ecosystems Guidance and templates • NCDENR:  Conservation Planning Tool  Green Growth Tool Box • Land of Sky Regional Council:  Linking Lands Project Three primary assessments: • Water Resource Services • Agricultural • Biodiversity/Wildlife Habitat • Threats to Green Infrastructure
  25. 25.  PTRC Watershed Prioritization Assessment
  26. 26.  NHP CPT Farmland Assessmenthttp://www.climatechange.nc.gov/pages/ConservationPlanningTool.html
  27. 27.  NHP CPT Biodiversity/Wildlife Habitat Assessmenthttp://www.climatechange.nc.gov/pages/ConservationPlanningTool.html
  28. 28.  Uses GIS assessments which identify, evaluate and prioritize important natural resources required to maintain healthy and sustainable ecosystems Guidance and templates • NCDENR:  Conservation Planning Tool  Green Growth Tool Box • Land of Sky Regional Council:  Linking Lands Project Three primary assessments: • Water Resource Services • Agricultural • Biodiversity/Wildlife Habitat • Threats to Green Infrastructure
  29. 29.  The more input, the better
  30. 30.  The more input, the better Survey results will be input into the Linking Lands model
  31. 31.  The more input, the better Survey results will be input into the Linking Lands model Other WG input?
  32. 32.  Howdo GI needs integrate with your needs?
  33. 33.  How do GI needs integrate with your needs? How can a GI Network be valuable?
  34. 34.  How do GI needs integrate with your needs? How can a GI Network be valuable? How do we accomplish our goals?
  35. 35.  How do GI needs integrate with your needs? How can a GI Network be valuable? How do we accomplish our goals? How do we serve everyone in the Triad?
  36. 36. Lisa Riegel: Director, NC Natural Heritage Trust Fund Lisa.riegel@ncdenr.gov Cy Stober: Water Resource Manager, PTRC cstober@ptrc.org Kyle Laird: Mobility and Systems Planner, PART kylel@partnc.org www.triadsustainability.org www.piedmontvoice.org

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