Chemistry i ia – week iii blog version

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  • Chemistry i ia – week iii blog version

    1. 1. Welcome to Chemistry II – Day III Portland Evening Scholars Mr. Treothe Bullock – Instructor    Complete - Chapter Review Presentations  Last chance to present for full credit Build a Molecule Simulation Lab  Debrief & Questions Chemical Naming and Composition - The Language of Chemistry  Formulae & Naming Systems  Practice reading and writing names  Final Project Work time    Be ready to share what you think you will research It is an option to work with a partner – you will double the components you research on your object Today’s Goal – Research and build slides I-III     Identify Your specific Object Develop a list of components / ingredients Choose a component to focus on Research raw materials sourcing
    2. 2. Chapter 7  Chemical Formula’s   Are single charged atoms Binary Ionic Compounds    Naming Binary Molecular Compounds  Monatomic Ions   Be able to read elements and number of atoms  Use ide at the end of the element name (Main group elements or Stock system Roman numerals (d block) (Table 7-1) Naming Binary Ionic Compounds  2 elements in these compounds     Nomenclature or naming systems rely on both elements. The prefix system of naming describes the number of atoms (Table 73 & 4) Some elements have more than one ionic form requiring stock system ID Polyatomic ions exist and have unique names (Table 7-2)
    3. 3. Chapter 7  Covalent Network Compounds   These compounds are written in the simplest ratio of elements despite large networks Using Oxidation Numbers for Formulas and Names   Acids and Salts       Most are either binary (2 elements H & a halogen) or oxyacids (H, O & 3rd nonmetal element) Table 7-5   Formula Masses  Oxidation Numbers   Indicates general distribution of electrons in molecular compound or ion Rules on p 216  Many nonmetals have more than one oxidation state Table 7-6 and Appendix Table A-15 list common oxidation numbers 2 naming systems exist – prefix and Stock (stock is the oxidation number) Is the sum of the average atomic masses of all atoms represented in its formula. Molar Masses  Mass if one mole of a substance
    4. 4. Chapter 7  Molar Mass as a Conversion Factor     Moles x molar mass = mass in grams Percentage Composition  Calculation of empirical formulas Mass of element in sample of compound / mass of compound x 100 = % element in compound   Consists of the symbols for the elements combined in a compound, with subscripts showing the smallest wholenumber ratio of the different atoms in the compound. Use % composition and determine mass of individual elements – establish a molar ratio Calculation of Molecular formulas   X (empirical formula) = molecular formula X (empirical formula mass) = molecular formula mass
    5. 5. Welcome to Chemistry II – Week II Homework for next week    Complete Chapter 7 review sheets – sections 1 & 2 Remember lab safety sign off if needed. Progress on Final Project far enough to know you can commit on your object.
    6. 6. Welcome to Chemistry II – Week II Homework for next week    Complete Chapter 7 review sheets – sections 1 & 2 Remember lab safety sign off if needed. Progress on Final Project far enough to know you can commit on your object.

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