Shs robotics over view for students

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Shs robotics over view for students

  1. 1. For Inspiration and Recognition of Science and Technology FIRST ® Overview Seaside Robotics Team 3673
  2. 2. Team 3673 Seaside High School Cyborg Seagulls Creative Young Brains Observing Redefining Greatness
  3. 3. <ul><li>Vision </li></ul><ul><li>“ To transform our culture by creating a world where science and technology are celebrated and where young people dream of becoming science and technology heroes .” </li></ul><ul><li>Dean Kamen, Founder </li></ul>I. Vision & Mission Mission To inspire young people to be science and technology leaders, by engaging them in exciting mentor-based programs that build science, engineering, and technology skills, that inspire innovation, and that foster well-rounded life capabilities including self-confidence, communication, and leadership.
  4. 4. <ul><li>Organization & </li></ul><ul><li> Programs </li></ul>FIRST Learning… never stops building upon itself, starting at age six and continuing through middle and high-school levels up to age eighteen. Young people can join at any level. Participants master skills and concepts to aid in learning science and technology through robotics.
  5. 5. Gracious Professionalism <ul><li>We learn and compete like crazy, but treat one another with respect and kindness in the process. </li></ul>
  6. 6. <ul><li>“ Sport for the Mind™,” combining the excitement of sport with science and technology </li></ul><ul><li>Problem solving and creativity with new challenges every year </li></ul><ul><li>Teams of young people with mentors </li></ul><ul><li>A tight timeline to learn efficiency and effectiveness </li></ul><ul><li>A value system based on “Gracious Professionalism TM ,” “Teamwork,” and “Coopertition TM ” </li></ul>II. Organization & Programs
  7. 7. II. Organization & Programs <ul><li>Mission is to INSPIRE , not EDUCATE </li></ul><ul><li>BUT look at what is involved : </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Math (algebra, geometry, trig, calculus) </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Science (physics, chemistry, experimentation) </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Language arts (writing, public speaking) </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Business (marketing, PR, fundraising) </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Finance (accounting) </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Computer Science (programming, 3D animation) </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Fabrication (woodworking, metalworking) </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Mentorship: Working side-by-side with professionals </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Teamwork </li></ul></ul>
  8. 8. Growth <ul><li>Combines the excitement of sport with science and technology </li></ul><ul><li>Creates a unique varsity Sport for the Mind™ </li></ul><ul><li>Grade 9-12 students (ages 14-18) discover the value of education and careers in science, technology, and engineering </li></ul><ul><li>New game each year </li></ul><ul><li>Common kit of parts </li></ul><ul><li>6-week build period </li></ul>FRC: <ul><li>Organization & </li></ul><ul><li> Programs </li></ul>FIRST ® Robotics Competition (FRC ® ): How It Works
  9. 9. <ul><li>FIRST ® Robotics Competition (FRC ® ): </li></ul><ul><li>2010 Season </li></ul><ul><li>1,809 teams </li></ul><ul><li>45,000+ high-school-age students </li></ul><ul><li>Average 25 students per team </li></ul><ul><li>44 Regionals/State Championships 7 District Competitions </li></ul><ul><li>340 teams advance to FIRST Championship </li></ul><ul><li>Organization & </li></ul><ul><li> Programs </li></ul>FIRST Robotics Competition Team Growth
  10. 10. <ul><li>Education in Science & Technology </li></ul><ul><li>FIRST Students vs. Comparison Group </li></ul><ul><li>Seek Education in Science &Technology </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Twice as likely to major in science or engineering </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>More than three times as likely to major specifically in engineering </li></ul></ul>III. Impact Source: Brandeis University, Center for Youth and Communities, Heller School for Social Policy and Management
  11. 11. <ul><li>Careers in Science & Technology </li></ul><ul><li>FIRST Students vs. Comparison Group </li></ul><ul><li>Earn Career Opportunities: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Almost ten times more likely to have internship </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Expect to Pursue Science & Technology Careers: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>More than twice as likely to pursue S&T career </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Nearly four times as likely to pursue career specifically in engineering </li></ul></ul>Source: Brandeis University, Center for Youth and Communities, Heller School for Social Policy and Management III. Impact
  12. 12. III. Impact FIRST Scholarships $12.2 million in scholarship funds available to FIRST participants “ I am very thankful for the inspiration that the FIRST experience gave me, and for this scholarship that allows me to be at a top institution, headed for a challenging and intriguing career.” Drew Blackburn, FRC Alumni Georgia Tech FIRST Scholarship Winner
  13. 13. Growth IV. Sponsor Investment More than 3,000 leading corporations, foundations, agencies, including Founding Sponsors and Strategic Partners (shown below):
  14. 14. 130+ colleges, universities, and corporations provide more than $12 million in scholarship opportunities and host events, including: IV. Sponsor Investment
  15. 15. FIRST V. Media: National Broadcast FIRST Championship, Georgia Dome, Atlanta
  16. 16. VI. Your Help Get Involved with FIRST <ul><li>Opportunities </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Financial support </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Equipment/parts </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Scholarships </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Facilities for teams and events </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Mentors, volunteers, consultants </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Internships </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Benefits </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Strengthens reputation and community relations </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Builds technological literacy </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Pipeline for interns and future employees </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Motivating volunteer opportunities for employees </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Applied professional development for employees </li></ul></ul>
  17. 17. Parent Meeting <ul><li>Attendance required </li></ul><ul><li>Play FIRST promo video </li></ul><ul><li>Talk about expectations </li></ul><ul><li>What the kids get out of it. </li></ul><ul><li>Scholarships, university recognition, leadership opportunities </li></ul><ul><li>Ask for donations and announce any fees </li></ul><ul><li>Recruit mentors, food providers, logistics help, etc. </li></ul>
  18. 18. OMSI Showcase Oct 23rd
  19. 19. FIRSTFare – Oct 30th
  20. 20. BunnyBot 2010 Dec 18th
  21. 21. Kickoff Jan 8th
  22. 22. Mentor Involvement <ul><li>Some team’s robots are entirely student designed and built. </li></ul><ul><li>Some team’s mentors and students work side by side. </li></ul><ul><li>Some team’s mentors pretty much do it all with students helping where they can. </li></ul><ul><li>All mentors should read FIRST Mentoring Guide at www.usfirst.org/uploadedFiles/Community/FRC/Team_Resources/Mentoring%20Guide.pdf </li></ul>
  23. 23. Team Management Team 1540 Organization Chart
  24. 24. Time Requirement <ul><li>It will take over 1500 person hrs to make a competitive FRC robot. </li></ul><ul><li>Data Point: Last year Team 1540’s members logged 2,900 student-hours over six weeks with 25 members. </li></ul><ul><li>Teams with mentors doing much of the work MIGHT be less. </li></ul><ul><li>Team 1540 requires students to log at least 50 hours in the fall and 50 in the build season. Average was 116 </li></ul>
  25. 25. Sample Budget <ul><li>$6,500 Registration for a regional </li></ul><ul><li>$2,700 Additional materials </li></ul><ul><li>$500 Practice field components </li></ul><ul><li>$200 Shipping crate (optional) </li></ul><ul><li>$100 Robot cart </li></ul><ul><li>$100 Publicity materials </li></ul><ul><li>$500 T-shirts & marketing </li></ul><ul><li>$0 Robot shipment –FedEx? </li></ul><ul><li>$400 Pre/Post-season events. </li></ul><ul><li>Total:$11,000 not including tools and shop fixtures </li></ul>
  26. 26. BunnyBots
  27. 27. Pit Appearance Matters
  28. 28. Pit Appearance Matters
  29. 29. Catlin Gabel Examples
  30. 33. SHS Student Requirements <ul><li>Be able to commit to the season and work nights and days. </li></ul><ul><li>Be able to commit 100 hours between now and the end of March 2011. </li></ul><ul><li>Be passing all classes with “C” or Better </li></ul><ul><li>Be able to work independently and in small groups. </li></ul><ul><li>Agree to be able to follow the “Training Rules”. </li></ul><ul><li>Agree to provide leadership in one or more team task areas. </li></ul><ul><li>Be a positive representative for Seaside High. </li></ul><ul><li>Be able to share your work and speak publicly about the teams work. </li></ul><ul><li>Work in a positive way with mentors. </li></ul><ul><li>Attend all team meetings and work times. </li></ul><ul><li>Communicate with Coaches and Team Student Coordinator. </li></ul><ul><li>Plan on attending the competition in March (During Spring Break) </li></ul>
  31. 34. Tasks to Work On

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