Multi Talented M F Ds Michelles Conference Paper09

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his paper describes the implementation of MFDs and outlines the issues which arose in developing services using this technology.

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Multi Talented M F Ds Michelles Conference Paper09

  1. 1. Multi-talented MFDs: Improving digitised document delivery and workflows in an academic library Michelle Coles Senior Library Officer, Document Delivery University of Western Australia Library 35 Stirling Highway, Crawley WA 6009 mcoles@library.uwa.edu.au Abstract Until the beginning of 2008, Document Delivery at the University of Western Australia (UWA) Library used a dedicated scanner to supply copies to other libraries. However, the failure of this scanner at the beginning of that year offered staff the opportunity to consider purchasing a new scanner and being forced to update Ariel software in all of the UWA libraries, or look to using another technology. The Library was also facing a number of other important issues which were related to this consideration. The introduction of services like Course Materials Online had meant the Library had expanding digitisation requirements. Document Delivery supply times were also increasing and the quality and size of scanned documents were less than optimal. As such, the Library decided to investigate a new technology: the Multi Function Device (MFD). MFDs offer in a single device the ability to print, copy, fax, and scan to local or networked drives. They can replace a number of machines in a workspace, while providing higher quality reproduction services. MFDs were purchased for all UWA libraries and replaced the old scanners and Ariel software. During the rollout of the MFDs the Library improved workflows and enhanced efficiencies in its Document Delivery and Course Materials Online services. It also developed a new standard for improving the size and quality of scanning. This paper will describe the implementation of MFDs and outline the issues which arose in developing services using this technology. 1 ALIA National Library & Information Technicians Conference, Adelaide, 2009.
  2. 2. Introduction What happens when the scanner we’ve been using for over ten years to scan and transmit copies (using Ariel software) to libraries stops working? Do we purchase a new scanner? Do we update the software across all libraries? Or do we move forward and investigate new technology? Early in 2008, these were the questions we were faced with in Document Delivery at the University of Western Australia (UWA) Library. We also had other factors to consider when researching the use of new technology. The main issue in Document Delivery was the quality of the document versus the file size supplied to libraries. The Library also had expanding digitisation requirements with the introduction of the new Course Materials Online (CMO) service. This service, introduced in 2004, offered a new way to deliver digital teaching and learning materials to students. Both Document Delivery and CMO had issues with the way copies were scanned using old processes. After extensive research Multi Function Devices (MFDs) – Toshiba E-Studio 2500c were implemented in all subject libraries in November 2008. MFDs offer in a single device the ability to print, copy, fax and scan to local or networked drives. They replace a number of machines in a workplace, while providing higher quality reproduction services. The rollout of MFDs at the UWA Library provided the opportunity to align workflows for Document Delivery and CMO. This enhanced efficiencies in both services for the Library. This paper will answer the questions asked previously by:  Describing the scanning process for both services before and after the implementation of MFDs and  Outlining the opportunities MFDs brought to the Library This paper will assist those who are:  Thinking of using MFDs in the future  Currently implementing MFDs in their workplace or  Already using MFDs 2 ALIA National Library & Information Technicians Conference, Adelaide, 2009.
  3. 3. Libraries at UWA The libraries at UWA are spread over three sites. The main site located in Crawley hosts the Humanities and Social Sciences Library (HSS) and the Business Library (BUS) (both located in the Reid Library building), the Music Library (MUS), the Law Library (LAW), the Maths and Physical Sciences Library (MPSL) and the Biological Sciences Library (BIOL). The two science libraries will be re-located into one library building, called the Science Library, in June 2009. The Education, Fine Arts and Architecture Library (EDFAA) is located across the road from the main site and The Medical and Dental Library (MED) is located off site at Sir Charles Gardiner Hospital. Why did the Library need to change? Up until 2008 the workflows and processes for Document Delivery and Reserve were separate operations. The Document Delivery Unit was located in Reader Services, Reid Library. Each subject library had their own Reserve, but the main Reserve collection was located in HSS. Document Delivery Figure 1 – Poor quality photocopy of an article 3 ALIA National Library & Information Technicians Conference, Adelaide, 2009.
  4. 4. All document delivery scanning was done on a flatbed scanner attached to a computer, loaded with Ariel software to scan and transmit copies to libraries. The scanning process was messy and inconsistent as there was no standard for scanning with Ariel. The pages could be upside down, backwards and contained extra dark areas along the margins of the page. The Library received complaints from requesting libraries about the poor quality of documents, pictures not in colour, text illegible and toner being used more quickly from printing documents that had these extra dark areas. The file format used to transmit documents via Ariel - Tagged Image File Format (TIFF) was not user friendly, difficult to view and were often large in file size. If there were problems with transmission the Library had to re-scan the whole document and resend it via Ariel. On most occasions documents were scanned initially in black to achieve the best textual reproduction and then scanned a second time in greyscale to improve image quality. This double handling was time consuming and very frustrating. LADD Online Copy request DDU MED SCIENCE HSS/BUS EDFAA LAW MUSIC Ariel Workstation Requesting Library Figure 2 – Document Delivery workflow As shown above, requests for supply came to the Document Delivery Unit (DDU) via the Libraries Australia Document Delivery system. Requests were processed and faxed to the subject libraries where the items were held. The supplying subject libraries (MED, MPSL, BIOL and DDU) scanned and sent copies to the requesting libraries using the flatbed 4 ALIA National Library & Information Technicians Conference, Adelaide, 2009.
  5. 5. scanner and Ariel. For the requesting libraries to receive these copies their workstation (PC with Ariel software and printer) needed to be on at all times otherwise transmission would not be successful. Eventually a decision was made to move away from scanning Ariel to Ariel. Instead, copies were scanned using the scanner and Ariel workstations and then sent on to the DDU Email Inbox. This process converted the TIFF file into a Portable Document Format (PDF). The document was then saved onto the Local Area Network (LAN) and attached to the request in LADD using the Drag and Drop function or sent via email. This was also a long winded process but it did allow copies to be delivered as PDFs, a more user friendly format. Subject Libraries who didn’t supply directly to libraries (EDFAA, Music and Law) photocopied the documents and sent them to DDU via the internal post. DDU staff received the copies and posted them to the requesting library. Waiting for the copies to arrive from these subject libraries was a slow, inefficient and time consuming process. On some occasions copies would go missing between the subject library and DDU. This then involved duplication of the process for staff in both the subject libraries and DDU. Reserve / Course Materials Online (CMO) Copies of articles and book chapters which were on Unit reading lists were traditionally held in the Library Reserve Collection in the form of individual course readings (manila folders with paper copies of the articles/chapters) stapled together, barcoded and catalogued. Producing these course readings was a very large and time consuming task. Library staff would receive lists of required materials from academics. The items containing the articles/chapters were then collected from the shelves and delivered to Copying Services, (Reid Library). Staff in this section would photocopy the pages and return them to Reader Services where they would be organised, barcoded and catalogued. When CMO was introduced in 2004, all copies were made available online and these individual course readings in paper format disappeared. 5 ALIA National Library & Information Technicians Conference, Adelaide, 2009.
  6. 6. CMO system Online Copy request Requests emailed MED SCIENCE HSS/BUS EDFAA LAW MUSIC Uploaded into Hive Copying Services Saved to LAN Figure 3 – CMO workflow As shown in Figure 3, CMO staff would email the subject libraries with details of the article/chapter required. A photocopy of the document would be made and sent via the internal mail to Copying Services who would scan the copy and save it on the LAN. CMO staff would upload the article to Hive (an online repository). This process was still slow and continued to involve double handling from staff across three sections: subject libraries, Copying Services and CMO. At times copies would go missing between the subject libraries and Copying Services. Has new technology made a difference? With the implementation of MFDs there was an opportunity to align the separate scanning workflows for both Document Delivery and CMO and make significant improvements. At the same time as the implementation of the MFDs the Document Delivery Unit moved from Readers Services to Information Resources Access Management (IRAM) and changed its name to Document Delivery (DD). Document Delivery and CMO As previously mentioned, the failure of the existing scanner in Document Delivery gave the Library an opportunity to find a different approach for supplying copies. There was discussion as to whether replacing the broken scanner and updating the Ariel software in all libraries was the best option, but it was seen that this would not improve the scanning process for CMO or resolve issues with quality that both services had. Eventually a 6 ALIA National Library & Information Technicians Conference, Adelaide, 2009.
  7. 7. decision was made to use the Multi Function Devices (MFDs) which were at the time being implemented in the Library. In November 2008, MFDs were bought and implemented in all subject libraries and these became the tool to replace all the existing Ariel scanners. As such, from this point on all scanning copies for Document Delivery supply and CMO occurred on an MFD. The MFDs (except in Music and Scholars where there was no staff dedicated MFD) were connected to the LAN and loaded with templates which contained scanning quality settings. The machines were set up with file locations where the scanned documents would be saved. Training was provided to staff involved in DD and CMO scanning. 7 ALIA National Library & Information Technicians Conference, Adelaide, 2009.
  8. 8. CMO task DD task VDX / CMO Same task for Online Copy both request Requests emailed Optimizing + Cropping Requests brokered REID MED SCIENCE HSS/BUS EDFAA LAW MUSIC Attaches to VDX req or uploads into HIVE MED O+C LAN folders on X Drive MED SC SCIENCE O+C REID (HSS/BUS) EDFAA LAW REID MUSIC O+ C Figure 4 – Combined workflow with MFDs As illustrated in Figure 4, document delivery requests are brokered (automatically forwarded) to the supplying subject libraries (MED, Science, DD/Reid) via the Virtual Document Exchange (commonly known as VDX) system. Staff now scan using the appropriate Document Delivery template on the MFD depending on the size of the item and if the copy has colour, (eg Doc Del A4, B&W or Doc Del A3, colour). Once scanned, the document is saved to the LAN. Staff in these libraries then optimize, crop and attach the copy to the request using the Drag and Drop function or send via email. Requests for copies from UWA subject libraries which do not supply directly via VDX are handled by DD within IRAM. These requests are sent to non-supplying subject libraries, (EDFAA, Music and Law) via email. EDFAA and Law scan using the MFDs and save to the LAN, while Music scan to a thumbdrive and save to the LAN. As reflected in the flowchart above, IRAM DD (Reid) staff then optimize, crop and attach the copy to the request using the Drag and Drop function or send via email for these three libraries. 8 ALIA National Library & Information Technicians Conference, Adelaide, 2009.
  9. 9. In CMO, requests for copies are sent to the subject libraries via email. The scanning process is the same as described above, however the CMO template is used instead. All subject libraries scan copies in this way, but only MED and Science Libraries optimize and crop copies. IRAM CMO (Reid) staff optimizes and crops copies for all other subject libraries (BUS, HSS, EDFAA, Music and Law). Documents are then uploaded into the Hive repository by IRAM CMO staff. What problems did MFDs solve? Figure 5 – Improved quality of a scanned copy The improved quality of scanned copies is the most important outcome of this new technology, as illustrated in Figure 5. Copies are scanned as PDF files which are a smaller file size than TIFF files and are more universally user friendly. By following the standard and guidelines, scanning is consistent and pages are scanned in order, all facing the same direction. Copies can be provided in black and white and/or colour. Requesting libraries are much happier to have pictures/photos in colour, rather than in greyscale. Making use of Adobe Acrobat means the document can be optimized (deskewed and file size reduced) and cropped (black margins removed) producing a good, clear quality document. The ability to set up templates on the MFD and connect each machine to the LAN improved workflows and efficiencies for both services. There is no double handling and the entire process can be finished in a few hours, a lot quicker than the previous workflow. Generally, the subject libraries are responsible for the scanning process while IRAM 9 ALIA National Library & Information Technicians Conference, Adelaide, 2009.
  10. 10. DD/CMO staff complete the end processing, (sending or publishing the documents). Saving scanned copies to the network means there is always a backup copy if one is needed and as such copies can’t go missing. The use of MFDs in the Library removed the need for a single dedicated workstation (flatbed scanner, computer and Ariel software) required for the scanning process. This meant the flatbed scanners and Ariel software were removed from the Library which saved much needed workroom space. Positive Outcomes The implementation of MFDs created opportunities in Document Delivery, CMO and the Library as a whole. These are described below. Workflow The implementation of MFDs allowed for a similar workflow to be designed for both DD and CMO, with only minor technical differences (as illustrated in Figure 4). There are 4 main steps in this workflow: 1. Collecting and Scanning Material is collected from the shelves and scanned using the MFDs. Staff select the appropriate MFD template (DD A4 B/W, DD A4 colour, CMO A4 B/W etc). The selected template automatically saves the scanned document to the appropriate folder on the LAN. 2. Checking Once the document is saved to the LAN, staff open each document in Adobe Acrobat and check each scan to make sure all pages are present, are legible and of suitable quality according to the guidelines. 3. Optimizing and cropping These processes are done using Adobe Acrobat. Optimizing deskews the text and reduces the file size of the document. Cropping removes any excess dark areas around the scanned image. Margins can be set for cropping across odd and even pages in one step. Once the initial guidelines have been established these are saved for future use. 4. Final Processing IRAM DD staff attach the document to the ILL request in VDX using the Drag and Drop function or send via email. IRAM CMO staff upload the document into Hive. Training Training guidelines for each step of the scanning, optimizing and cropping process (see Appendix 1) were created. Responsibility for training was centralised and undertaken by a Librarian in IRAM. He visited each subject library and provided one-on-one training to 10 ALIA National Library & Information Technicians Conference, Adelaide, 2009.
  11. 11. staff involved in scanning. Staff in the subject libraries had this opportunity to increase their skills and learn something new. Optimizing and cropping processes are complex and specialised tasks which require initial training and ongoing involvement in the process in order to maintain skills. Document Requirements There had been an issue over the quality and the size of the document supplied. Previously it was not always possible to provide the best quality scan and often the file sizes were too large to transmit via Ariel. In collaboration with IT staff, templates were developed on the MFD which had the exact specifications required to give a high quality and low file size scanned document. It was a process of trial and error before the desired results could be produced. The template specifications for both DD and CMO are exactly the same. The only difference is in the workflow, where the scanned documents are saved to different folders on the LAN (see Figure 4). From these specifications a standard was developed, “Document Digitisation in PDF: CMO and DocDel”, documenting normal practice to be used library-wide. It includes details such as what the resolution should be for greyscale/colour (300 dots per inch) and the settings required for Adobe Acrobat optimizing. The outcome of this standard is a scanned PDF copy with higher resolution – better quality and clearer to read, in greyscale and/or colour and optimized to reduce the file size. Hardware and Software The introduction of MFDs freed up whole workstations, removing the need for a dedicated PC, scanner and Ariel software. The flatbed scanners were removed in all libraries and the PC’s used for other purposes. Ariel software was decommissioned as a delivery method for supplying and receiving copies. All documents supplied by UWA are now via the document store (using the Drag and Drop function) or via email. The MFDs provided the opportunity for Adobe Acrobat 5 to be added to the standard operating environment across the libraries. This allows all library staff access to this tool, not only the select few involved in the scanning process. MFDs allow documents to be scanned and saved as PDFs – files which have more functionality and are user friendly. The use of Adobe Acrobat in the optimizing and cropping process reduces the file size of scanned documents, (for example a 10Mb file can be reduced to 1Mb or less). It is easier to transmit copies with a reduced file size through the VDX document store as larger documents tend to crash the system. This tool has an additional function in that it can insert and delete pages in the PDF when required. 11 ALIA National Library & Information Technicians Conference, Adelaide, 2009.
  12. 12. Document Delivery Supplying Statistics In the past UWA Document Delivery supplying statistics have been low and at times poor quality copies were supplied. Figure 6 illustrates the total number of copies we have supplied to WAGUL (WA Group of University Librarians) libraries over 5 years. Figure 6 – UWA Document Delivery: Copies supplied Source: “WAGUL Document Delivery Benchmarking 2004-2008”. Of interest is the years 2006 (747 copies), 2007 (837 copies) and 2008 (1339 copies). There is a gradual increase in supply between 06 and 07 and then a steep increase between 07 and 08. In 2007, we ceased to use Ariel to supply copies direct to libraries. We:  Scanned a document using Ariel  Sent it to the DD Email Inbox  Saved the document to the LAN  As a PDF, attached copy to the VDX request using the Drag and Drop function, or  Sent copy via email The switch to delivering PDFs during this period accounts to some extent in the increase in the number of requests to supply. Requesting libraries prefer this format. The implementation of MFDs in late 2008 coincides with the dramatic increase in supply requests shortly after. Libraries across Australia have noticed the Library’s improved document quality and turnaround times and as such were placing UWA higher on the rota than they had previously. 12 ALIA National Library & Information Technicians Conference, Adelaide, 2009.
  13. 13. The Library has also noticed there is more activity for UWA as a reciprocal supplying location with VDX and CLIC (CAVAL Inter Library Consortium) libraries. These libraries supply to each other because all locations provide high quality low Mb files via the Drag and Drop function in VDX. Copying Services Before MFDs, Library Copying Services played a large part in scanning, optimizing, and cropping documents for CMO. With the rollout of MFDs Copying Services no longer participates in this process. Staff in the subject libraries have become more involved, especially in the supplying libraries (MED and Science). These two libraries scan, optimize and crop documents, while staff in IRAM complete these processes for the other libraries (Reid, EDFAA, Law and Music). With Copying Services removed from this role, it has reduced double handling of copies from staff across different sections in the library and therefore, increased the efficiency of this service. The future of MFDs at UWA There has been discussion by Library management on how to move forward with MFDs. There is an idea to extend the Document Delivery service to UWA Academic staff. Academics would be able to make requests for copies of journal articles which are held in the UWA print collection but are not available electronically. Requests for copies would come through the VDX system as they currently do and there would be no change in the scanning workflow. The print articles would be scanned on an MFD, optimized, cropped and attached to the request in VDX. The potential to view high quality PDF copies on their desktop could be an added service to UWA Academic staff. In conclusion, the implementation of MFDs in the Library has been very beneficial for everyone involved including UWA Library staff, Academic staff and students as well as requesting libraries. MFDs have:  Increased efficiencies  Produced higher quality resolution PDFs  Reduced file size  Created a new combined workflow for Document Delivery and CMO scanning This has enabled us to provide a much improved, highly appreciated service to our customers. Bibliography Archibald, D. (2009). WAGUL Document Delivery Benchmarking 2004-2008, Unpublished report, Edith Cowan University Library, Perth, W.A. Nicholls, S. (2009). VDX implementation End of Project Report, Unpublished report, University of Western Australia Library, Perth, W.A. Nicholls, S. (2008) Impact of the MFD roll out, Unpublished paper, University of Western Australia Library, Perth, W.A. CAVAL Linking Leading Libraries. Retrieved August 6, 2009 from http://www.caval.edu.au/clic.html 13 ALIA National Library & Information Technicians Conference, Adelaide, 2009.
  14. 14. Toshiba Leading Innovation - Multi Function Devices. Retrieved August 6, 2009 from http://www.toshiba.com.au/ 14 ALIA National Library & Information Technicians Conference, Adelaide, 2009.
  15. 15. Appendix 1 – Examples of Training Guidelines for scanning with MFDs (Written by the IRAM, Document Delivery Librarian) Scanning to PDF using the MFDs: DocDel, Med, Science The MFDs have templates to allow scans to be saved directly to the correct folder on the X-drive. There are four options set up for document delivery: • DocDel Scan B&W A4 • DocDel Scan B&W A3 • DocDel Scan Colour A4 • DocDel Scan Colour A3 Choose the A4 or A3 template depending on the size of each page in the original item. The majority of items will fit one page to A4. If the page doesn’t appear to fit to A4 then use A3 to ensure you get all the required text in the scan. Use the Colour templates if the item you are scanning contains any colour at all. For all other material use the B&W templates. The B&W templates scan in greyscale so photos will be good quality and tightly bound pages should still be legible. Using the templates for scanning • On the MFD control panel press the round button marked TEMPLATE • On the touch screen choose PUBLIC TEMPLATE GROUP • Choose the template that suits your needs. Usually this will be DocDel Scan B&W A4 • Press SCAN TO FILE OR USB • Press FILENAME • Leave the ILL# there and then add the ILL number from the request using the number keypad. You should now have a filename such as ILL#435671. Leaving the ILL# on the filename indicates that the scan has not yet been optimized and cropped. • Press ENTER then ENTER again • Place the cover sheet face down on the glass and press SCAN on the touch screen • Continue to scan each page of the item by pressing SCAN • When you have scanned all the pages press JOB FINISH on the touch screen • The scanned document is automatically saved to the appropriate folder on the X-drive: X:DocDelScansDD X:DocDelScansMed X:DocDelScansScience • Check that the document has saved correctly by going to a staff computer and browsing to your folder. Your document should be saved there. • Open the PDF and check that all the required pages are there and legible. Once you are satisfied that the document is fine then you can optimize and crop the document as required. 15 ALIA National Library & Information Technicians Conference, Adelaide, 2009.
  16. 16. Inserting pages (scanning interrupted) If your scanning is interrupted or times out and you haven’t finished the whole document, this can be fixed. If it times out, or if you press JOB FINISH in the middle of a document, what you have scanned will be automatically saved to your folder. You can then go back later and continue with the rest of the document. • When resuming the scan, go through the same steps as outlined above for scanning. • Add an extra letter to the end of the new filename (eg. ILL#435671a) so that it doesn’t save over the top of the first part you scanned. • When you have finished the second part and it has been saved to your folder you can then put the two parts together into one PDF. • Open the first part with Adobe Acrobat. • Go to the top menu bar; choose Document and then Insert Pages. • Browse to your folder and find the second part of your scan. Double-click to open. • Choose where you want the pages inserted (eg. The settings will usually be Location: After, Page: Last). • Save the now complete PDF with the original filename. • Once you are satisfied the document is complete then you can optimize and crop the document as required. Optimizing and Cropping PDF scans for DocDel (draft) Once the document has been scanned and saved to the appropriate folder in the DocDelScans folder on X drive it needs to be optimized, cropped and saved using Adobe Acrobat Standard 8. Optimizing Open the PDF by double-clicking on it (eg. ILL#456756.pdf). Reduce the viewing size (zoom) to around 50% so that you can see an entire page on your screen. It is easier to process if you can see the edges of the page. • Go to the Document menu and choose Optimize Scanned PDF. 16 ALIA National Library & Information Technicians Conference, Adelaide, 2009.
  17. 17. • Make sure the settings on the next screen are set as follows. You should only have to make these changes once per user as the settings will be saved from then on. The only two settings that may need changing the first time are: Background removal: change to Medium Despeckle: change to Medium Click on OK and wait for the optimizing process to finish. This can take up to 60 secs for a very large document. Cropping (to be expanded) • Go to Tools then Advanced Editing and choose Show Advanced Editing Toolbar. • Drag the toolbar to the top your screen so it stays near your other toolbars. • Choose the Crop tool (blue square icon). • Start at the first page scanned page of the item (ie. leave out the request page if that has been included). 17 ALIA National Library & Information Technicians Conference, Adelaide, 2009.
  18. 18. • Use the Crop tool to select the area you wish to keep. • Double click inside the selected area to bring up the Crop Pages box. • Use the Page Range to select the range of pages to be cropped using the (eg. From 1-16). • Make sure that you have selected Apply to the appropriate type of pages: Even and Odd Pages, Odd Pages Only or Even Pages Only • As an example, if the scan alternates the pages correctly from left to right, you can crop page 1 first and apply that cropping to all the odd pages in the document. Then you can crop page 2 and apply that cropping to all the even pages in the document. • Proceed as required until the document is cropped to your satisfaction. If you make a mistake at any point you can go to Edit and choose Undo crop pages (more than once if you need to go back several steps). Saving • Go to the File menu and choose Save As (You may need to browse to X:DocDelScansDD) • Remove the “ILL#” part of the filename, leaving just the number. • Click on Save. A new PDF is created by Acrobat. • Once the process has finished delete the original scanned file with the “ILL#” at the start. Deliver the document via the Drag & Drop function or email and then move it to the appropriate Sent Items folder. 18 ALIA National Library & Information Technicians Conference, Adelaide, 2009.
  19. 19. Scanning to PDF using the MFDs: CMO (Subject Libraries) The MFDs have templates to allow scanning direct to the correct folder on the X-drive. There are four options set up for CMO: • CMO Scan B&W A4 • CMO Scan B&W A3 • CMO Scan Colour A4 • CMO Scan Colour A3 Please note the following CMO scanning standards: • Choose the A4 or A3 template depending on the size of each page in the original item. • Use the Colour templates if the item you are scanning contains any colour at all. For all other material use the B&W templates. • CMO documents need to be scanned with each page as a separate scan (usually one page per A4) even if the item is small enough to fit two pages per scan. • Make sure that all page numbers and text are included on every page. • If you are scanning a Book Extract then also include the Title Page and the Verso Page (usually the opposite side of the Title Page). These pages include all the publication and copyright information which is required when we use a chapter or an extract from a book. Using the templates for scanning • On the MFD control panel press the round button marked TEMPLATE • On the touch screen choose PUBLIC TEMPLATE GROUP • Choose the template that suits your needs. Usually this will be CMO Scan B&W A4 • Press SCAN TO FILE OR USB • Press FILENAME (there should already be HIVE# as the default filename) • Leave the HIVE# there and then add the Alias ID from the request using the number keypad. You should now have a filename such as HIVE#98567. Leaving the HIVE# on the filename indicates to the CMO staff that the scan has not yet been optimized and cropped. • Press ENTER then ENTER again • Place the cover sheet face down on the glass and press SCAN on the touch screen • Continue to scan each page of the item by pressing SCAN • When you have scanned all the pages press JOB FINISH on the touch screen 19 ALIA National Library & Information Technicians Conference, Adelaide, 2009.
  20. 20. • The scanned document is automatically saved to your folder on the X-drive: X:CMOScansBusiness X:CMOScansEDFAA X:CMOScansHSS X:CMOScansLaw X:CMOScansMed X:CMOScansScience • Check that the document has saved correctly by going to a staff computer and browsing to your folder. Your document should be saved there. • Open the PDF and check that all the required pages are there and legible, including page numbers. • Once you are satisfied that the document is fine then move it to the top level of the CMOScans folder for IRAM CMO staff to action: X:CMOScans Inserting pages (scanning interrupted) If your scanning is interrupted or times out and you haven’t finished the whole document, this can be fixed. If it times out, or if you press JOB FINISH in the middle of a document, what you have scanned will be automatically saved to your folder. You can then go back later and continue with the rest of the document. • When resuming the scan, go through the same steps as outlined above for scanning. • Add an extra letter to the end of the new filename (eg. ILL#435671a) so that it doesn’t save over the top of the first part you scanned. • When you have finished the second part and it has been saved to your folder you can then put the two parts together into one PDF. • Open the first part with Adobe Acrobat. • Go to the top menu bar; choose Document and then Insert Pages. • Browse to your folder and find the second part of your scan. Double-click to open. • Choose where you want the pages inserted (eg. The settings will usually be Location: After, Page: Last). • Save the now complete PDF with the original filename. • Once you are satisfied that the document is fine then move it to the top level of the CMOScans folder for IRAM CMO staff to action: X:CMOScans 20 ALIA National Library & Information Technicians Conference, Adelaide, 2009.
  21. 21. Optimizing and cropping Med and Science only: • Proceed to optimize and crop the document • Save the document and remove the HIVE# part of the file name. This indicates to the CMO staff that the document is ready to be placed in CMO. • Once you are satisfied that the document is fine then move it to the top level of the CMOScans folder for IRAM CMO staff to action: X:CMOScans 21 ALIA National Library & Information Technicians Conference, Adelaide, 2009.
  22. 22. Appendix 2 - Document Digitisation in PDF: CMO & DocDel (Written by IRAM Document Delivery Librarian) Scope Documentation of accepted standard within the Library for Course Materials Online and Document Delivery Why PDF1 • PDF stores structured objects • Full text search enabled • Compact • Metadata can be embedded • Device independent Concept PDF – Portable Document Format Collaborate Publish Create Process Distribute Edit Word (doc) PowerPoint (ppt) Office convertor Accessible Excel (xls) Acrobat Improving documents Portable Html Notepad(txt) PDF Small(er) files ………. Acrobat PDF Maker Any electronic files Library • Combine, insert , delete pages • Simple text editing • Cropping Document Delivery What else? : Prepress • Bookmarking Course Materials Online eBook • Linking Digithesis Electronic forms • Comments and mark-up • Security 1 http://www.pdf-tools.com/public/downloads/whitepapers/whitepaper-pdfa.pdf 22 ALIA National Library & Information Technicians Conference, Adelaide, 2009.
  23. 23. What can be converted to PDF? Document name File Extension Originating application Bitmap image .bmp Various image applications Excel spreadsheet .xls Microsoft Excel GIF image .gif Various image applications JPEG image .jpg, jpeg Various image applications PageMaker document .pmd Adobe PageMaker Plain text file .txt, .text Various text editing applications PostScript file .ps, .eps Various applications PowerPoint presentation .ppt Microsoft PowerPoint TIFF image .tif, .tiff Various image applications Web page .htm, .html Various web page editors Word document .doc Microsoft Word Illustrator file .ai Adobe Illustrator Encapsulated PostScript .eps Any vector applications inc. Freehand, Illustrator, Coral Draw 1. Course Materials Online a. Electronic resources Available in a digital format (eg PDF, Websites, conference proceedings) b. Scanned resources Books or journals scanned in multifunctional devices • Multi page PDF • Greyscale 300 dpi for text • Full colour 300 dpi for colour graphics • Acrobat optimisation: Document>Optimize Scanned PDF o Deskew: automatic o Background removal: Medium o Edge shadow removal: Cautious o Despeckle: medium o Descreen: Automatic o Halo removal: On • PDF to be down-saved by printing the file as PDF • High quality print c. Scanning of Book Extract or Chapter 23 ALIA National Library & Information Technicians Conference, Adelaide, 2009.
  24. 24. When scanning a Book Extract/Chapter include the Title Page and the Verso Page (usually the opposite side of the Title Page). These pages include all the publication and copyright information. 2. Document Delivery a. Electronic resources PDF resource downloaded from online resource sites and sent to requestor(s) as is without any alteration to the PDF document b. Scanned resources Books or journals scanned in multifunctional devices • Multi or single page PDF • Greyscale 300 dpi for text • Full colour 300 dpi for colour graphics • Acrobat optimisation: Document>Optimize Scanned PDF o Deskew: automatic o Background removal: Medium o Edge shadow removal: Cautious o Despeckle: medium o Descreen: Automatic o Halo removal: On • PDF to be down-saved by printing the file as PDF o High quality print (IT to create a job option that is selected by default) 3. Combine multiple files into one a. CMO and DocDel Start with optimized PDF Do not attempt to combine with different file types Combined files must be printed as PDF via selecting PDF Printer as a printer using High Quality Print 24 ALIA National Library & Information Technicians Conference, Adelaide, 2009.

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