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Information Brief by Inter Services Public Relations (ISPR)

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A detailed presentation by Inter Services Public Relations (ISPR) concerning the following: Fauji Foundation Bahria Foundation Shaheen Foundation Army Welfare Trust Special Communication Organization Frontier Works Organization National Logistics Corporation Secondment to Civil Departments Class Composition of Pakistan Army Defence Housing Authority Allotment of Agricultural Land Defence Complex Islamabad Military Farms Balochistan – Development Work Through Army Assistance FATA Development Through Army Development in Sindh Province – Assistance by Army Army’s Assistance to Ministry of Education (MoE) Army’s Assistance to National Vocational and Technical Education Commission (NAVTEC) Army’s Assistance Earthquake / ERRA Flood Relief Operations – 2007 Sindh & Balochistan Defence Budget General Questions Comparison of Pakistan and India National/Defence & Army Budget Army Contribution to The Nation Exchequer and Budget Graph World Wide Military Expenditures Comparison Basic Pay Scale Pakistan’s Contribution to UN Peacekeeping Operations Economic Performance of the Present Government A Comparison From the Past Comparative Performance of Key Economic Indicators

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Information Brief by Inter Services Public Relations (ISPR)

  1. 1. INTER SERVICES PUBLIC RELATIONS DIRECTORATE INFORMATION BRIEF
  2. 2. CONTENTS 1. Fauji Foundation 1 - 4 2. Bahria Foundation 5 - 7 3. Shaheen Foundation 8 - 9 4. Army Welfare Trust 10 - 14 5. Special Communication Organization 15 - 16 6. Frontier Works Organization 17 - 19 7. National Logistics Corporation 20 - 22 8. Secondment to Civil Departments 23 9. Class Composition of Pak Army 24 10. Defence Housing Authority 25 - 29 11. Allotment of Agricultural Land 30 - 31 12. Defence Complex Islamabad 32 - 34 13. Military Farms 35 - 36 14. Balochistan – Development Work Through Army Assistance 37 - 46
  3. 3. CONTENTS 15. FATA Dev Through Army 47- 58 16 Dev in Sindh Province – Assistance by Army 59 - 69 17. Army’s Asst to Ministry of Edn (MoE) 70 18. Army’s Asst to National Vocational and Tech Edn Commission (NAVTEC) 71 19. Army’s Asst Earthquake / ERRA 72 - 74 20. Flood Relief Operations – 2007 Sindh & Balochistan 75 21. Budget General Questions 76 - 77 22. Comparison of Pakistan and India National/Defence & Army Budget 78 - 82 23. Army Contribution to The Nation Exchequer and Budget Graph 83 - 86 24. World Wide Military Expenditures 87 25. Comparison Basic Pay Scale 88 - 89 26. Pakistan’s Contribution to UN Peacekeeping Operations 90 - 101 27. Economic Performance of the Present Government A Comparison From the Past 102 - 107 28. Comparative Performance of Key Economic Indicators 108 - 109
  4. 4. 4 FAUJI FOUNDATION ● Fauji Foundation (FF) is an entirely Independent Welfare Organisation set up for the welfare of ex-servicemen and their dependents. ● Operates on a completely self-sustaining basis. ● Channels approximately 80% of the profits from commercial ventures into social protection programmes. ● Serves a beneficiary population representing approximately 7% of the Country’s population. General ● Fully Owned − Fauji Cereals − Foundation Gas − Fauji Sugar Mills − Fauji Corn Complex − Foundation University − Fauji Security Services − Overseas Employment Services − Experimental & Seed Multiplication Farm ● Associated − Mari Gas Company Limited. − Fauji Cement Company Limited. − Pakistan Maroc Phosphere, S.A − Fauji Fertilizer Company Limited. − Fauji Fertilizer Bin Qasim Limited. − Foundation Securities (Pvt.) Limited. − Fauji Oil Terminal & Distribution − Fauji Kabirwala Power Company Limited. Company Limited. • All these translate into a current asset base of over Rs. 125 billion, and net worth of over Rs. 72 billion.
  5. 5. 5 Details of Employees FAUJI FOUNDATION ● Group employs approximately 13,000 personnel. ● Approximately 60% of whom are from the civil sector, the other being from amongst the beneficiaries of the Foundation. ● 40% are retired military personnel out of which 80% are low ranking officials while remaining 20% are retired officers who are running this outfit quite efficiently. Annual Generation and Tax Payment ● In FY 2005-06, the commercial operations of Fauji Group, contributed almost Rs. 33 billion to the national exchequer in the form of duties, taxes & levies. ● The growth is achieved through judicious investments & dedicated work. ● The Foundation does not accept any grants. ● Foundation always successfully meets all its continuously expanding welfare obligations across the country, from resources generated itself. ● Foundation never defaulted. Pays all its dues, invests in well regulated sectors only. ● Manned by a management dedicated to further the cause for which it was set up. ● Other investors queue up to partner with it and most readily trust its board control. Miscellaneous
  6. 6. 6 Spent more than Rs. 21 billion since inception on welfare :- ● Health −Health Services of FF include 1 Tertiary Care Teaching Hospital, 7 Secondary Health Care Hospitals, 1 Nursing Training School, 109 Primary Health Care Units. FF Artificial Limb Centre is the only one of its kind in the region and provides services not only to the local population but exports to neighbouring countries as well. −Has Rs. 1.5 Billion annual budget for health, employing 455 doctors including 131 specialists. −It carries 8000 major surgical operations annually. −2.5 million outdoor patients are treated annually while it treats 400000 indoor patients. ● Education −Fauji Foundation Education System has over 100 institutions located throughout the country. −Faculty strength of over 1700. −Annual budget of over Rs. 700 million is being spent for providing education to over 38,000 students. ● Others −Every year approximately 70,000 stipends are being disbursed in students. −About 5,000 of whom are for higher professional programmes and superior academic performance. −Annual budget is about Rs.118.50 million - largest stipend scheme in the private sector. −Every year about 6,000 trainees are given technical and vocational training at FF technical Training Centres. −Over 6,000 individuals trained annually through the Vocational & Technical Training Centers Welfare Projects FAUJI FOUNDATION
  7. 7. 7 FAUJI FOUNDATION ● Mostly Commercial Ventures are in major rural areas, however, some are established in remote areas like Machi Goth, Mirpur Mathelo & Dharki. Whereas, welfare projects are mostly in the remote areas primarily for the welfare of retired soldiers and their families. ● Fauji Foundation does not contribute directly to the welfare of serving army personnel. A slight contribution is made indirectly for widows of shaheeds of the Armed Forces. ( 8 x Flats per annum for widows of Army Shaheeds, 3-4 Flats for the Shaheeds of PN and PAF). ● A Committee of Administration is headed by Secretary Defence, 4 x Principal Staff Officers from GHQ & 1 x Each from Pakistan Navy and Pakistan Air Force does monitor the overall policy of the organization. However, operational control rests with the organization itself. Miscellaneous
  8. 8. 8 It has following business concerns :- ▬ Maritime Service. ▬ Pharmacy. ▬ Trading. ▬ Naval Recruitment ▬ Travels. ▬ Security and Diving Services. ▬ Education. ▬ Commercial complexes. ▬ Paints. ▬ Bread Manufacturing. ▬ Child Care Centre. ▬ Boat Building and Engineering Works. Business Projects • Bahria Foundation was established in January 1982 by the Govt of Pakistan as a charitable Trust under the Endowment act. • The Foundations aim is to establish profitable business for the welfare and rehabilitation of serving and retired personnel including civilians. • Bahria Foundation generates its own funds and is not funded by Navy in any form. Bahria Foundation is not involved in any Government Project, except for building a school at Chikar Azad Kashmir earthquake affected area, from its own resources to contribute in rehabilitation process. Brief About Organizat-ion BAHRIA FOUNDATION
  9. 9. 9 • Bahria Foundation is governed by a committee of administration for major policy decision. • The operation and management of the various business functions of Bahria foundation are controlled by Board of Directors. • MD of foundation is head of the board and DMDs South and North and Director Finance are the members Board of Directors. Controlling Auth and Policy Formulation All business activities/financial transactions are audited yearly by reputed auditors as per corporate rules and procedures. Annual Generation and Tax Payment, Audit • Bahria Foundation employs 76 retired Naval Officers and 231 retired personnel of the Navy. • In addition 3222 civilians are also employed including teacher/staff in 45 colleges of Bahria Foundation. • Bahria Foundation provides jobs to a large number of civilians, much more than service personnel. Details of Employees BAHRIA FOUNDATION
  10. 10. 10 • Bahria Foundation contributes major part of its income to Pakistan Navy Benevolent Fund for welfare activities of the Navy, particularly for the families of Shaheeds and disabled persons. • Bahria Foundation also funds various charitable efforts of the Pakistan Navy, such as providing special equipment and teaching aids for backward children and computer centres for the children of sailors. • Bahria Foundation Colleges are providing quality education to about 16000 students in small and remote towns of the Pakistan at affordable costs Bahria Foundation has NO business interests in:- ▬ Bahria Town and Housing Schemes. ▬ Bahria University. ▬ Bahria Construction. ▬ Bahria Shipping. ▬ Bahria Coastal Sea Fishing. ▬ Bahria Deep Sea Fishing. ▬ Bahria Farming. ▬ Bahria Holding. ▬ Bahria Dredging. ▬ Bahria Ship Breaking. Welfare Projects BAHRIA FOUNDATION Miscellan-eous
  11. 11. 11 1486 PAF retired personnel and 2434 Details of Employees civilians are employed. • Shaheen Foundation paid Rs 302 million in the form of taxes from year 1991-2005. • During last two years Shaheen Foundation paid taxes of Rs 43 million Annual Generation and Tax Payment, Audit ▬ Aviation ( Shaheen Airport Services and Shaheen Cargo. ▬ Educational Services( Shaheen School Systems). ▬ Shaheen CNG Station Sargodha. ▬ Fazaia Welfare Filling Station. ▬ Real Estate (Shaheen complex Karachi, Lahore and Shaheen Foundation estate projects). ▬ Trade and Services( Shaheen Aero Trade, Shaheen Insurance, Shaheen Knitwear, Ensign Communiqué Ltd, Shaheen medical Services, Shaheen Rent a Car). ▬ Hawk Advertising. Details of Business Projects • Shaheen Foundation, a Trust of the Pakistan Air Force, was established in 1977 under the Charitable Endowment Act 1890. • The foundation was created to promote welfare activities for the benefit of serving and retired PAF personnel including civilians and their dependents, and to this end-generates fund through industrial and commercial enterprises. Brief about the Foundation SHAHEEN FOUNDATION
  12. 12. 12 • Welfare activities of the Foundation are either employment biased or education centric. • Foundation awards scholarships to top students in the PAF managed schools and colleges are awarded a scholarship of Rs. 1500/- per student and Rs. 900/- to the student studying in other Government Schools. • Since this scheme was launched in 1980 about 35602 students have benefited. • Since 1997 top students studying in high/ professional institutes are awarded Shaheen Fellowship scholarship. • Excellence award is given to the students in various Boards of HSSC and Universities on all Pakistan basis. – It has provided education scholarship of worth Rs 17.54 million to deserving students – it has undertaken medical welfare schemes of worth Rs 35.89 million – It undertook Haj Expenses of its 4 employees – During last two years Shaheen Foundation sent 113 persons abroad for jobs thus earning FOREX for the Country. Welfare Projects SHAHEEN FOUNDATION
  13. 13. 13 ARMY WELFARE TRUST (AWT) ● AWT started its enterprise in 1971 with an equity of 7 lac Rupees under the Society Act 1860. ● Present assets of the AWT stands at Rs. 108 billion. ● It is a welfare org. The funds generated by AWT are utilized for the welfare and rehabilitation of the dependants of shaheeds and war/service related disabled personnel. Brief About Org AWT has 30 big and small projects, out of which following are located in remote areas:- ● Total land is 1268 Acres. Only 500 Acres is under cultivation, remaining are water logged. Efforts are in hand to bring remaining land under cultivation. Cultivated land is given to Haris on 50% Batai. Approximately 340 people are working in this farm Khoski Farm (Near Badin) ● Established in 1984. It has a crushing capacity between 2000-3400 TCD. It has provided employment to approximately 1000 people. AWT sugar mill is proven to be the best paymaster to the local sugarcane growers in entire Sindh Army Welfare Sugar Mills (Badin) ● In NWFP, AWT has a Cement Plant in Nizampur, the only industry of this size in a radius of 100 km providing employment to approximately 700 people. This plant is generating economic activity for local population. Askari Cement Factory (Nizampur)
  14. 14. 14 AWT Contributions to the Army Welfare System ● AWT has employed over 11,000 people consisting retired military personnel, next of kin of Shaheeds/War wounded and civilians (60% civilian). ● AWT is directly helping poverty alleviation and improving the economy of Pakistan. ● Welfare Activities ▬ Up-gradation of Military Hospitals. ▬ Formation Garrison Medical Centres. ▬ Special education academy. ▬ AWT annually contributes towards scholarship for Nustian wards of JCO/OR. Students of South/North Waziristan are also being sponsored. ● Total contribution to date by AWT is Rs. 933 million
  15. 15. 15 AWT ● AWT yearly generation is approx Rs 11 Billion. ● It contributes over Rs 3 - 4 Billion in the form of income tax and duties. Annual Generation and Tax Payment ● All transaction of AWT are properly audited by internal and external auditors. ● Rep of CBR closely monitors the transaction and all taxes are paid as per govt permissible rules. ● AWT organisations have structured, elaborate and transparent decision making systems. ● AWT Board of Directors approves corporate policies and approval of expenditures upto 300 millions. ● Decisions beyond Rs 300 million are taken by Committee of Administration. Controlling Auth and Policy Formulation, Audit ● AWT employs 11000 personnel. ● 3091 officers of AWT are civilians against 161 retired military officers. ● Other Staff include 2177 civilian technocrats while 597 are retired low ranking military personnel. ● 2/3 of its manpower is civilians. No serving Officer is employed in AWT. Details of Employees
  16. 16. 16 AWT Business Projects Army Welfare Trust Nizampur Cement Plant Askari Cement Limited (Wah) Askari Cement Marketing (Rwp) Askari Pharmaceutical (Lahore) Army Welfare Sugar Mills Badin (Sindh) Army Stud Farm Probynabad (Okara) Army Stud Farm Boyleguni (Okara) Army Farm Rakh Baikunth (Lahore) Army Farm Khoski (Sindh) Askari Farms and Seeds (Lahore) Askari Fish Farm (Lahore) Calf Fatting Farm (Lahore) Army Shoe Project (Lahore) Army Woolen Mills (Lahore) Services Travel (Rawalpind) Askari Travel and Tour (Rawalpindi) Army Welfare Real Estate Scheme (Rawalpind) Army Welfare Real Estate Scheme (Peshawar)
  17. 17. 17 AWT Business Projects Army Welfare Real Estate Army Welfare Real Estate Scheme Lahore Scheme Karachi Army Welfare Saving Scheme (Rawalpindi) Askari General Insurance Company (Rawalpindi) Askari Commercial Bank Limited Askari College of Entrepreneur (Rawalpindi) (Rawalpindi) Askari Guards Limited (Rawalpindi Askari Information Systems (Islamabad) Askari Welfare Hosiery Unit (Rawalpindi) Askari Aviation Limited (Rawalpindi) Askari Security Limited (Islamabad) Mobil Askari Lubricant Limited (Karachi) Askari CNG Project (Rawalpindi) Blue Lagoon Restaurant (Rawalpindi) Renewable Energy Project (Rawalpindi)
  18. 18. 18 SPECIAL COMMUNICATION ORGANIZATION (SCO) Brief About Org ● SCO was raised in 1976 to provide the telecommunication facilities in mountainous areas in AJ&K and Northern Areas. ● The projects started off with 400 Lines exchanges in Muzaffarabad and Mirpur & 200 Lines exchanges in Gilgit, Skardu and Chilas. Details of Business Projects ● Projects Completed • International Gateway Exchange and Satellite Earth Station (cost of Rs 198 million- Average monthly international traffic is approx 2 million incoming and 1 million outgoing). • 15000 Line Outside Plant in Northern Areas. • 390 Km Optical Fibre Cable- Gilgit, Skardu, Youching, at the cost of Rs 198 million. • 68 Km Optical Fibre Cable from Gilgit to Astore. ● Ongoing Development Projects • Phase II of the Rural Telecom Uplift project for AJ&K at a cost of Rs 1706 million to provide 114000 telephone line. 102000 lines have been laid through 50 additional new digital exchanges. • 75000 line GSM Project almost complete. In addition 200000 more connection projects being planned. • 570 KM Optical Fibre Cable will be completed by June 2007. • 450 KM Optical Fibre Cable from Mansehra to Gilgit. 438 KM completed. • 26 new digital exchanges with 18000 telephone lines. Details of Employees ● The existing structure is based on 75% Military personnel ex Corps of Signals and 25 civilians.
  19. 19. 19 SCO ● Development and Non Development budget is allocated annually from the Ministry of Planning and Ministry of IT&T. ● Funds are disbursed through CMA, while external audit is carried out by DG Audit (Post, Telephone and Telegraph). ● All revenue earned by SCO is deposited back to the national exchequer. ● During last five years SCO have deposited Rs 80 million in terms of income tax. During last three years SCO has also paid approx Rs 350 millions in terms of Central Excised Duty. Annual Generation, Tax Payment and Audit
  20. 20. 20 FRONTIER WORKS ORGANIZATION (FWO) ● FWO, a segment of Army Engineers, has contributed tremendously in the economic development of the Nation by executing multipurpose national projects. ● FWO was raised on 31st October 1966 to construct Karakoram Highway.15000 personnel spread over an inhospitable and harsh terrain for over 800 Kms. FWO succeeded in its challenge and completed the Herculean task in 1978 after tremendous sacrifices. More than 400 soldiers laid down their lives with over 1000 sustaining disabling injuries in their quest to achieve this national objective. ● FWO has now mastered its skills and has ventured into the domain of major international construction companies by undertaking highly prestigious and technically advanced projects in the field of Thermal and Hydroelectric Power, Drainage networks, Canals, Dams, Tunneling, Highways and Airfields, Telecommunication projects of PTCL, works for Railways, Services / Civil Construction of City. ● FWO was entrusted the challenging task of emergency rehabilitation of Sukkur Barrage. ● Employing nearly 12000 personnel, the main work component of FWO is organized into construction units and construction teams. ● The construction units are employed on large scale projects whereas construction teams take up medium and small scale projects.
  21. 21. 21 FWO ● FWO has integral quarrying and carpeting units. ● FWO has achieved specialization in the following fields of civil engineering works:- ▬ Highways with international specifications, especially in difficult and mountainous areas. ▬ Roads / tracks of all types under all terrain conditions. ▬ Civil works of large projects involving mass concreting such as concrete structures of dams, canals and drains. ▬ Projects involving large quantities of rock cutting, control and cautious blasting, earth excavation and compaction. ▬ Tunnels and other underground structure / works. ▬ Airfields including their allied structures and buildings. ▬ Civil works of large power generation projects both thermal as well as hydroelectric. ▬ Sub-surface drainage works. ▬ Works of Railways, WAPDA & Irrigation department. ▬ Telecommunication Projects of PTCL. ▬ Land reclamation works. ▬ Maintenance and management of motorways / highways. ▬ Large earthwork projects like earth fill dams & flood protection embankments.
  22. 22. 22 FWO Name of Project (Proj) No of Proj Cost in (Million) Road Construction / Maintenance 72 39579.379 Air Fields / Runways 17 2245.234 Rock / Earth Work 10 803.143 Canal Work 9 332.001 Hydro Electric and Thermal Power Work 4 1860.755 Building / Accommodation Work 11 297.382 Parks 2 85.442 Bridges / Structures 9 386.169 Water Supply 7 1577.348 Fuel Tank 02 19.993 Tunnels 4 93.635 Drainage Works 7 1282.172 Dams / Marine Structures 6 112.208 City / Housing Societies Development 24 893.613 Ongoing Projects 66 90443.465
  23. 23. 23 NATIONAL LOGISTICS CORPORATION (NLC) ● NLC is the public sector leading transportation & construction organisation in the World. ● NLC introduced the concept of containerization, which has changed the transportation industry. ● NLC is frequently employed by the Govt to handle emergencies. ● Commodity shortage, natural calamities or transporters strikes often put strain on country’s logistic system. NLC is then called in to restore normalcy through professional handling of the crisis situation. ● It has its own technical support organization to keep the fleet on the go. It is the only road transportation organization to install fully computerized vehicles monitoring system. ● The system facilitates in the identification of the location of cargo being transported, and in forecasting its arrival at destination. General
  24. 24. NLC 24 ● Transportation ־ Dry Cargo Operations( Specialization in Containerize Transportation) ־ Liquid Cargo Operation (Major oil carrier for OGDC, BP and MOL). ־ It lifts 50% nation’s crude oil production from far flung areas where private builders dare not venture ־ Car Carriers ● Engineering and Construction. NLC construction activities are no longer restricted to Pakistan. It is now engaged in construction work in Qatar and Afghanistan ● Dry Ports and Freight Management . NLC is spearheading the drive to establish Dry Ports in Pakistan. It exclusively operates the Karachi and Hyderabad Dry Ports. In addition NLC has established modern Container Freight Stations at Lahore and Amangarh. NLC also handles international freight transiting through Pakistani ports and offers warehousing facilities to UNWFP, UNHCR,UNICEF and other Food Agencies. It also provides the facilities of Warehousing, Custom Clearance, Scanners, Modern Border Terminal ● Tolling NLC has increased the toll revenue by four times since its employment on National Highway. NLC is operating 29 toll Plazas on National Highways. Till June 2006 the toll collected by NLC exceeded Rs 6 Billion. Details of Business Projects
  25. 25. 25 NLC ● NLC Polymers. NLC operates the NLC polymer plant. This plant has the capacity of rethreading 12000 tyres per annum. NLC is now manufacturing the rubber parts for Pakistan Railways and for the world renowned motor companies like Mercedes and Ford Motor etc. ▬ Army Officers - 97 ▬ Retd Army Officers - 27 ▬ JCO/ORs - 2634 ▬ Civil Officers - 179 ▬ Civil Staff - 5846 Details of Business Projects Details of Employees Rs. 5959.6 Annual Turn Over Million (2006) Annual Tax Paid Rs. 125 Million
  26. 26. 26 SECONDMENT TO CIVIL DEPARTMENTS ● Presently there are 326 Army Officers of various ranks are serving in 66 Civil Ministries/ Departments Number of officers in Civil Ministries/ Departments ● As per Govt Policy a fixed number of officers are sent on secondment to Civil Ministries/ Departments . ● Civil departments ask for good officers, which the Army is hard pressed to send because of commitments. But despite this, requests are acceded to. ● Names are forwarded to departments who select the officers. Policy for Secondment ● Retirement Age of Major - 44 - 46 Years ● Retirement Age of Lt Col - 46 – 47 Years General
  27. 27. 27 CLASS COMPOSITION OF PAK ARMY Comparison between previous and revised class composition is as under:- Class Previous %age Current %age Revised %age 2001 2007 2011 Punjabi *71.06 57.39 54.50 Pathan 13.65 14.18 14.50 Sindhi 15.00 15.40 17.00 Bloch - 3.20 4.00 Kashmir & Northern Areas - 9.11 $9.00 Minorities 0.29 0.72 1.00 * Including Kashmir & Northern Areas 9.29% $ Including Abad Kashmir 7% and Northern Areas 2%
  28. 28. 28 DEFENCE HOUSING AUTHORITY (DHA) ● Armed Forces around the world place high value on the need to fulfil socio-economic responsibilities to their personnel. ● It is essential for morale raising and for maintaining dignity/satisfaction during and after service. ● 60% of the officers of the Army retire before 45 years of age, therefore, besides re-employment their biggest worry is how to continue to find suitable shelter for their families after retirement. It is imperative that they are facilitated in rehabilitation. ● DHA have been created for the welfare of Armed Forces Personnel and to compensate Next of Kins of Shuhada, wounded and disabled persons. ● DHA are self financing organisations functioning on no loss no profit basis. ● Govt resources are not used for management and supervision for development purpose and same is carried out of its own resources. ● No public /army funds are used in any manner what so ever. Concept
  29. 29. 29 DHA ● A comprehensive welfare policy has been implemented and allotment to armed forces personnel in DHAs by GHQ. ● There are over 50000 members in all three DHAs from all three svcs and all segments of society. ● 20 percent quota is reserved for civil gazetted officers, senior citizens, public representatives of Federal/Provincial Legislative bodies, Journalists, disabled citizens and civilians paid out of defence. Allotment Criterion
  30. 30. 30 DHA ● A1 Lands of Army are NOT used by any DHA. All lands of DHA are procured from market through fol measures:- ▬ Purchase through Cash. Purchase of land on agreed upon price. ▬ Purchase through exemption. Purchase of land free of cost and develop the same giving 50% plots to the landowners. ▬ Combination of Cash and Exemption. Partial payment of price and suitable exemption. ▬ Purchase through Award. Purchasing land through Govt after making payment of charges fixed by the Govt.
  31. 31. 31 DHA ● Over 5000 personnel from civil sector are employed in DHAs. ● Due to ongoing development works over 150000 direct and indirect employment opportunities exist. Employment ● DHAs runs its own schools and colleges. Presently there are 9 colleges, 19 Schools. 20882 students are being imparted quality education through 2167 efficient staff members. ● A special education academy at Karachi, a free vocational training centre at Lahore for special children and an International Standard Special Education Academy at Islamabad have been established. ● DHA Lahore has donated 130 Acres land worth Rs. 5 billion to Austrian University. ● DHA Lahore has adopted Charrar Village improving education, health, drinking water, sewerage system and metalling of streets. Welfare Measures ● Due to large scale construction activities going on in DHA over Rs 300 Billion economic activities have been generated in construction related industry. ● Direct investment of Rs 150 Billion in DHAs is expected in on going and planned projects. ● DHAs are one of the biggest tax payers in the country/respective provinces and remitting over Rs 6.5 billion tax to Govt annually. Taxes
  32. 32. 32 ● Allotment of Plots to Officers DHA ▬ Defence Housing Societies are private societies run, primarily, by Retired Military Officers. A few serving officers are employed in administration. ▬ Required land is acquired on commercial rates from the market. ▬ All expense of societies i.e. establishment pay, allowances, procurement and development costs of the land are borne by society members. ▬ Plots are allotted by the Society to members on “no profit no loss” basis. ▬ The cost of plot rises only due to better management and credible development of the acquired land with facilities out of funds generated by the DHA members.
  33. 33. 33 ALLOTMENT OF AGRICULTURAL LAND ● Whenever the Provincial Govts launch any scheme for allotment of land under Landless Tenants Schemes, Defence Forces are given 10% share. Out of 10% following distribution is made :- − JCOs/OR : 82% − Brigadiers and Below : 16% − General Officers : 2% ● After acquisition from Provincial Government, the land is distributed among all three Services based on the strength of each service. ● The allotment to widows of Shaheeds/deceased, disabled/war wounded and serving/retired deserving cases is made as an incentive to all ranks through transparent policy based on absolute merit. ● The defence allottees of agriculture land deposit the cost of the land according to PIU (Produce Index Unit) fixed by the Provincial Governments. ● No public money is spent in this process. Criterion for Allotment of Land ● Allotment of agriculture land to Govt officials and institutions including defence persons is in practice since creation of Pakistan, which is being followed as per Colonization Land Act. ● The Army has voluntarily decreased its ceiling of land allotment and now nobody can be allotted more than 40 acres. ● All ranks do not get land. It is a merit based system Agriculture Land Allotted to Defence Personnel
  34. 34. 34 ● The land normally placed on defence schedule is termed as waste land (GHAIR MUMKIN TIBBA) and lot of efforts, determination and expenditure is required to make it cultivable. ● A total of 833,268 acres have been allotted to Armed Forces since 1947 and not 2,303,706.5 acres as alleged in Ayesha Siddiqa’s Book. ● Army personnel who were allotted wasteland in Sindh and other provinces have played a key role in development of the province. ● Servicemen have converted the barren areas in different parts of the country into productive crop areas by spending their hard earned pensions and own resources. ● This practice not only benefits the allottees in their rehabilitation but also helps to improve the GDP of the country. ● Thus the allotment of this land is neither loss to the state nor discriminatory practice at all. Quality of Land ALLOTMENT OF LAND
  35. 35. 35 DEFENCE COMPLEX ISLAMABAD (DCI) • The decision for co-location of all Services HQs in Capital was taken in 22nd JCC meeting held in March 1972 chaired by then President of Pakistan (Zulfiqar Ali Bhutto). • The allocation of areas in Islamabad to all Svc HQs was done in October 1981. • The new premises comprises Min of Def, JS HQ, GHQ & SPD and will be known as New Def Complex Islamabad (DCI). It is NOT GHQ ALONE which will be shifting. • The need for National Defence Complex was felt for integrity of Command at national level with the Defence Ministry, JS HQ, Services HQ & SPD located in close proximity having secure communications and Command structure enabling better coordination, security and protection also. • It was decided that NHQ will be shifted in the 1st Phase. • AHQ and NDC (Now NDU) in second phase. • MOD, GHQ and JSHQ in the final phase. • AHQ, NHQ and NDU have already shifted. • Present GHQ building is an old structure, almost 100 years old. • There is an acute shortage of residential accommodation in Rawalpindi. • Approximately there are 15000 ( 2000 officers and 13000 lower staff) are working within MOD, JSHQ and GHQ at Rawalpindi. • Accordingly in March 2003, President of Pakistan decided to shift GHQ, MOD and JSHQ to Islamabad. • It was decided that all expenditures would not be undertaken through Govt’s budget allocations: instead MOD will dispose off surplus army lands to fund the complete project. Back Ground
  36. 36. 36 DEFENCE COMPLEX ISLAMABAD (DCI) ● Phase-I : April 2006-December 2011 ● Phase-II : January 2011-Dececember 2015 Major Phases of the Construction ● The complete area encompasses E-10, D-11 and area North of E-10/D-11. ● E-10 , 1115 acres (Residential Complex) ● D-11, 328 Acres (Residential Complex and supporting army units/establishments) ● North of E-10/D-11, 1008 acres (for office complexes, allied establishments and educational facilities) ● Total 2451 acres. ● To make optimum use of the area more than 95% buildings will be four storied. DCI will have only Govt accommodation and no Defence Housing Society will be inside the complex. ● Other Facilities inside DCI − 200-600 bedded hospitals. − 16 Schools and 2 colleges. − Libraries, Auditorium and Masjids. − 2 Officer Messes. − 10 Community Centres − Parks Salient Features
  37. 37. 37 DEFENCE COMPLEX ISLAMABAD (DCI) ● In order to compensate the people, the local inhabitants are allotted a residential plot in Islamabad and been given monetary compensation against their built-up properties for vacation of land ● In 1982 Land was allotted for construction of DCI. However, at that time CDA only gave compensation to locals for land. No compensation was given for built up properties. That is the reason locals did not vacate the land. It continued till 2005. Progress made since 2005 :-  Sector E-10. Survey of built up properties, announcement of award and payment of compensation to affectees has been completed. Award was announced on 2 May 2006. 143, total number of affectees have paid full. 85% people have vacated the houses.  Sector D-11. Award was announced on 18 Nov 2006. All 314 affectees have been made full payments. 90% have vacated their houses  Western Side Road. Survey of build up properties has been completed. Award was announced on 12 July 2006. Total number of affectees was 193 and 169 out of them have been paid. The matters are being resolved with remaining 24 occupants. 60% houses have been vacated. ● Area North of Sector E-10/D-11. ● CDA on GHQ’s persuasion has recently initiated basic work for rehabilitation of affectees. ● In this regard scrutiny of revenue record of C-15&C-16 where plots will be given to the affectees and initial contact with locals for package deal is being carried out. ● The major issue about this area is that locals in order to derive maximum benefits have resorted to a lot of new and illegal construction. Some of the awardees of E-10/D-11 have started to relocate themselves to this area to fraudulently get the second benefit. ● CDA and ICT Police have so far not been able to check this menace and no effective measures are seen in the offing. ● This is likely to create serious problems at the time of survey and payment of compensation. Land Matters
  38. 38. MILITARY FARMS 38 ● Military Farms Okara and Renala consists of 2 Dairy Factories, 7 Military Farms and 22 Villages. ● These are catering the requirement of Dairy Products of the Armed Forces. ● Land of these farms and villages belongs to the Punjab Govt which was leased to British Army in 1913. ● The total land involved is 20156 acres, out of which 16627 acres is spread over 22 villages. ● This land of villages is being managed through 1323 lessees. Okara Military Farms ● Total Military Farms - 9 ( 7 x Okara & 2 x Lahore) ● Total Land - 25159 Acres (Okara – 20200 Acres, Lahore Farms 3349 Acres, Bengali Farms Lahore 1610 Acres) ● Land on Contract - 14863 Acres (Okara) ● All Land is Provincial. ● Under the Resolution Number D-3428-A of 10 December 1925, adapted by Pakistan vide The Pakistan (Adaptation of Existing Pakistan Laws). Order 1947:- ▬ The Govt of Pakistan has the right to remain in undisturbed possession of any land in its occupation in any province on the 1st April 1921, subject to the conditions then ruling, so long as such occupation is necessary for the effective discharge of its duties. ▬ A local Govt has no power without the consent of the Govt of Pakistan to alienate or in any way to interfere in regard to land situated within the provincial boundaries, which is in the occupation of the Central Govt. ▬ Irrespective of any lease deed concluded between Centre and Government of Punjab, the above resolution alone validates the possession of land by the Army as long as the necessity exists. General
  39. 39. 39 OKARA MILITARY FARMS ● The land used to be managed through lessees under the Battai System, which did not prove to be productive due to certain reasons. ● The revenue generated Rs 40 million in 1995-96 reduced to Rs. 15.8 million in year 2000 due to malpractices by lessees. ● Farms management in order to raise the yield from crops, in consultation with the lessees evolved a new Contract System. ● Contract System includes:- − The land to be leased at subsidized rates, Rs 2200-5000 against prevailing rates, 12000-13000. − The lessees to pay lease rent in cash in 3 instalments − Lease period is for 7 years without annual increase in the contract rent. − 10% trees planted after June 2000 will be the property of the lessees. − Lessees are given representation in village committee − Lessees can keep any no of animals − Land to be leased to only sitting lessees − In case of death of any lessee the land to be contracted to next of kin. − Model villages will be constructed in which lessees will get propriety rights of residential plots − There will be no middle man the rent will be deposited by lessees direct in the bank. Welfare Measures includes :- − Medical Treatment − Veterinary Treatment − Improvement of Livestock − Education of Children − Civic Facilities − Socio-Economic Facilities − Provision of Loans Back Ground
  40. 40. 40 BALOCHISTAN – DEVELOPMENT WORK General Province of Balochistan lagged behind in development from rest of the Country due to its inaccessible terrain and lack of communication infrastructure and unwillingness of Tribal Leaders of Balochistan. Present Govt is giving due attention and have started massive development works in the Province. ● Development Works ־ Government is now carrying out 138 development projects worth Rs 137 billions in Balochistan which are far more than any other province. ־ Rs 7 Billion are being spent on brick lining watercourse in Balochistan. ־ Communication network is being upgraded in Balochistan. ־ 750 Km long Coastal Highway from Karachi to Gwadar has already been made. 950 Kms road from Gwadar to Rato Dero via Turbat and Khuzdar is under construction. ־ Night Landing facility at Quetta Airport is being provided. ־ Railway line from Quetta to Zhob and Quetta to Chaman is being upgraded. ־ Chamlang Coal Mines having big economic prospects have been re-started by this Government. Rs 30 Billion income is expected annually out of this project. Jobs have been provided to 1200 Balochies as Guards, 500 have been inducted as Levies here. 200 contractors and 6000 labourers have locally been hired. ־ Rupees 7 million are being spent in 55 Agriculture Schemes. ־ 46 projects at a cost of 100 million Rupees are initiated for Public Health Engineering.
  41. 41. 41 BALOCHISTAN – DEVELOPMENT WORK ־ It is appreciable that Balochi youth is now joining Army and Frontier Corps. Army has relaxed its merit standards to provide incentives to Balochi youth. Earlier there used to be 3-4 Balochi cadets in a course at PMA, this time 30 Cadets were commissioned from PMA in various units of Pakistan Army. ־ Frontier Corps will open 23 Schools in the Province while Corps HQ had started a technical institute to impart skilled education to Baloch children. ־ Sui. About 90000 people from Sui had fled to other areas, due to unjust and cruel attitudes of their Nawabs and Wadeeras, have now come back to their areas and settled down in their native town. Govt is rendering them all necessary assistance in settling down process. ־ A labour Colony is being established in Sui to facilitate the locals while displaced people are being accommodated in their land. ־ A road from Dera Bugti to Kashmore is being constructed. 60 km Sui to Uch Road and another, Dera Bugti to Rajanpur is also being constructed. ־ 210 Water courses and 150 Water Tanks would be brick lined. ־ Dera Bugti. Rs 130 million have been allocated for Dera Bugti only for relief and development works. Rs 30 Million are allocated for family assistance. Rs 20000 per family to 1500 families. Job Enrolment of Rs 37 Million. For Health and Agriculture Sector Rs 32 Million are earmarked.
  42. 42. 42 BALOCHISTAN – KOHLU DEVELOPMENT PACKAGE ● Inter Girls College Kohlu (Rs 100 Million approved ) work in progress. ● RS 31 million approved for 8 Water Supply Scheme in Kohlu Town, Bohri Kuli Faiz Muhammad, Malikzad, Jada Khan Matwand, Sahik Khan Maiwand, Basily Tehsil Maiwand. (In some Scheme work is in progress in some it has been completed). ● Up gradation of Inter College for Boys at District Kohlu at the cost of Rs 40 Million. ● Construction of Basic Health Unit Killi Jan Marri Kohlu at a cost of Rs 5.592 Million. ● Electrification of Killi Girsni Gharbi / Sharqi, Wadera Misri Khan, Mastwa Klli are at a cost of Rs 13.1 Million (100% work completed). ● Rs 499 million approved for construction of cadet college.
  43. 43. 43 DEVELOPMENT PROJECTS ANNOUNCED BY THE PRESIDENT Project Cost Gwadar Port 6000.00 Mn Coastal Highway 7.753 Bn Flood Protection Scheme in Marri / Bugti area 125.00 Mn Up-gradation of land in Quetta, Pishin and Mangocher 436.00 Mn Construction of drainage / ponds etc 600.00 Mn Welfare package for Kalat 50.00 Mn Building Tourism infrastructure facility for public and tourists 7.00 Mn Plan for installation of 100 Tube wells 2,078.194 Mn Action plan for water management in Balochistan 130.800 Mn For better education in Balochistan in the next five years 1500.00 Mn Kuchlak – Zhob – DI Khan Road 800.00 Mn Welfare package for Zhob 50.00 Mn
  44. 44. 44 DEVELOPMENT PROJECTS ANNOUNCED BY THE PRESIDENT Project Cost in Million Dev of communication network in Balochistan in next three years 10,000.00 Rehabilitation of Quetta – Zhob Road 270.00 Provisions of 30000 Tons free wheat to drought hit areas 0 Improvement of Kachi – Harnai road 0.350 Writing off of loans up to Rs 5 lac 620.00 One thousand ‘free of cost’ gas connection for poor people of Kalat 10.00 Provision of gas facilities to 52 villages of Balochistan 200.00 200 bulldozers for draught hit areas of Balochistan 600.00 Cadet College at Zhob 235.00 Total 23,842.344
  45. 45. 45 DEVELOPMENT PROJECTS ANNOUNCED BY THE PM Project Cost in Million Welfare/development package for Hub 50.00 Welfare/development package for Zhob 10.00 Construction of Sabakzai Dam at Zhob, including extending of electricity line upto dam and to the villages of Zhob 230.00 Establishment of Agriculture College in Jaffarabad 220.00 Laying of Athletics track at Jinnah Stadium and Swimming Pool at Quetta 48.00 Facility for drinking water supply 35.00 Construction of roads in Nasirabad and Jaffarabad Districts 400.00 Electrification of 197 villages of District Nasirabad and Jaffarabad 100.00 Restoration of Karezes in Panjgoor 10.00 Construction of drainage system at Dera Murad Jamali 100.00 Construction of drainage system at Dera Allah Yar 100.00
  46. 46. 46 DEVELOPMENT PROJECTS ANNOUNCED BY THE PM Project Cost in Million Construction of drainage system at Usta Muhammad 100.00 Establishment of Sardar Bahadur Khan Women University 50.00 Purchase of equipment for 100 bedded hospital at DA Yar 100.00 Construction of Dam on Sukelji river in Sunni (Bolan) 2.30 Construction Embroidery Centre at Kharan 5.00 Establishment of Residential Public School in Jaffarabad 95.00 Development works at Sibi 50.00 Review of estimates for Kachhi Canal 18.00 Total 1,723.3
  47. 47. 47 SPECIAL PM PACKAGE – 13 OCTOBER 06 Prime Minister (PM) announced a special package of Rs. 19.5 billion for the Balochistan to help the Provincial Govt to overcome the financial crisis and gear up peace of development activities. This special package is in addition to Rs. 164 billion worth mega projects being implemented in the Province. The package includes:- Increase in Federal Divisible Pool under the NFC Award Rs. 6.3 Billion Gas Development Surcharge Rs. 2 Billion Development Packages for Dera Bugti and Kohlu Rs. 2.5 Billion Gwadar Development Authority (GDA) Rs. 2 Billion District Govts (Less Dera Bugti / Kohlu) Rs. 100 Million for each District Rs 2.9 Billion Workers Welfare Fund Rs 1.7 Billion Deferment to Provincial Loans for next year Rs. 2.1 Billion Total Rs. 19.5 Billion
  48. 48. 48 DEVELOPMENT PROJECTS ANNOUNCED BY THE PM Project Estd Cost 14 x Road Construction Projects 364.75 2 x Electrification Projects 10.50 1 x Education Project 20.00 17 x Water Supply Schemes 54.47 1 x Health Project 2.00 G.Total 451.72 A special package of Rs. 4 Billion for Quetta city to improve its infrastructure, social sector uplift and capacity building of Quetta City Government. Special package of Rs 2.2 Billion for social sector projects in Sui area has been proposed by Parliamentary Sub-committee on Balochistan.
  49. 49. 49 PRESIDENT SPECIAL DEVELOPMENT PACKAGE FOR BALOCHISTAN 7 DECEMBER 2006 Grants • Development of Quetta Rs. One Billion • Funds for each District(28 Districts) Rs. 100 Billion • Parliamentarian Development Scheme Rs. 2.5 Billion Education • 7x new Cadet Colleges. • 2x new Campus for Balochistan University at Gwader and Turbat. • 1000 x scholarship for Baloch Students in best schools / colleges of the Country with free lodging and boarding. • 6x new Buses for Balochistan University. • Student completing 16x years of education will get stipend of Rs. 10,000/- per month for a year. • Waving off of agriculture loan upto Rs. 300,000/-
  50. 50. 50 FEDERALLY ADMINISTERED TRIBAL AREAS (FATA) DEVELOPMENT ● General  The development works carried out in FATA have brought about a new sense of awareness among the tribals.  This has not only changed their mindset but has also given them a realization to open their doors for progress and prosperity. ● Development Works in FATA  Comprehensive development plan for FATA has been evolved to effect a meaningful socio-economic change and uplift of FATA.  Army has been extensively engaged in well being of the tribals through out the length and breadth of FATA with a view to improve quality of life and win their hearts and minds. The efforts initiated by the Army have been received well and are widely acclaimed.  Emphasis of the said measures have been on provision of communication Infrastructure, Education, Health, and other important allied civil amenities of life. ● Development of Roads and Bridges. A package worth US $ 6.5 Mn funded by US Embassy. The work is in progress. ● Tribal Area Assistance Programme (TAAP)  US $ 140-160 Mn would be provided for FATA Development through a donors conference led by Japan  A comprehensive development plan worth Rs 9,127 Billion was conceived accordingly.  Indulgence of the locals during preparatory stage of the plan raised their expectations.  Projs amounting to Rs. 1379.19 Mn were therefore, started in 2005. An amount of Rs 200 Mn have been released for completion of ongoing projects.
  51. 51. 51 FATA DEVELOPMENT ● Annual Development Programme (ADP). Most of the development funds are being allocated by the Federal Govt to Governor’s Secretariat through ADP. ● Humanitarian Assistance Development Programme –III (HADP-III). Rs 300 Mn are required for provision of basic life amenities in FATA like Tubewells, Deepwells, Hand Pumps and Water Supply Schemes etc. ● Other Welfare Activities ▬ Dissemination of Printed Material. Leaflets, handbills, posters and brochures are being delivered with a view to project development work and persuade locals in favour of the Army and the Govt. ▬ Celebration of Festivals and Distribution of Various Items. Festivals like Eids, Independence Day, Pakistan Day and local fairs, etc are being celebrated jointly with the locals. Friendly matches, public/student rallies and declamation competitions, are being organised. Rations, sports gear and stationary items, etc wroth Rs 6.73 Mn have been distributed among the locals so far. Special messages have been printed on note books issued to FATA Children to persuade them to cooperation with Army in its efforts to raise the level of literacy in FATA. ▬ Radio and PTV Coverage. Radio Pakistan Razmak, Wana and Miran Shah have started regular transmissions. ▬ Audio and Video Films  “ Wana Olives (War on Terror)”, “Winds of Change (Dev in FATA)”, Taraqi ka Safar (Dev in FATA)” and “Roshan Subh (Dev in FATA)” has been developed by ISPR.  Tele Film “WANA” and Audio Cassette (Palwashay) have been produced by HQ 11 Corps to highlight the good job done by the Army and misdeeds of terrorists.
  52. 52. 52 FATA DEVELOPMENT ▬ Afforestation. Afforestation in FATA has been carried out free of cost at following places:- • 200 acres area in Sholam (SWA). • 100 acres area in Angoor Adda (SWA). • 5000 plants have been distributed in Angoor Adda, Dre Nishter and Srakanda area. ▬ Olive Grafting. Some areas in FATA are thickly populated with wild Olives. Efforts are in hand to convert such olive trees to fruit bearing trees by means of grafting. The expertise of Pakistan Oil Seed and Development Board has been incorporated for the purpose. The details of olive grafted trees are as under:- Agency Total Number of Plants Grafted Successful ▬ SWA 1,30,000 50,000 ▬ Orakzai 1,25,00 83,000* Total 2,55,000 1,33,000 *6500 trees grafted in Orakzai Agency have started bearing fruit. ▬ Payment of Compensation to Affectees – SWA. Rs 213.3 Mn were allocated for payment of compensation to the affectees of SWA. Till now, amount of over Rupees 171.68 Mn has been paid 998 x claimants by the Political Administration. The payment of compensation worth Rupees 41.61 Mn to remaining affectees is under progress.
  53. 53. 53 FATA DEVELOPMENT ● Education (Edn). Steps have been initiated at various levels:- ▬ Free education (including free boarding and lodging) is being imparted to 90 x Students in Waziristan Cadet Campus Bannu, Army Public School Thal and Nowshera Garrison. ▬ 5x Students have joined Chinar APS Murree in Mar 06. Efforts are in hand to arrange this facility for 5 x FATA students every year subsequently. ▬ 4x Students have joined Sargodhian Spirit Trust Public School in Aug 06. These student are being financed by the Army for five year costing Rs. 0.8 Mn per annum. The same number of students are being inducted in 2007, who will be financed by AWT and Fauji Foundation respectively. ▬ 10x Students have joined Military College Jehlum (MCJ). The same no of students will be subsequently inducted in MCJ every year. ▬ A scholarship scheme for 200 x FATA students has been approved which is being implemented by FATA Secretariat. ▬ 105 x Students have been imparted free vocational training at Khyber Institute of Technical Education (KITE) incl free boarding and lodging at Peshawar vocational training will be conducted twice a year. ▬ Training of 40 x teachers was arranged during last summer vacations. ▬ Few excursion trip for students were also planned to promote goodwill among the tribal youth. ▬ A sum of Rs 100,000.00 (Rupees one hundred thousand) has been allocated for construction of additional room at Jarobi High School. ▬ Army has completed construction 26 schools in FATA and are also pursuing the case with FATA Secretariat and Ministry of SAFRON for posting of requisite staff to these schools. As a result, Federal Govt has recently sanctioned 98 posts for above schools. Efforts are in hand for posting of staff for remaining schools.
  54. 54. 54 FATA DEVELOPMENT ● Medical Care in FATA. Free medical treatment is being provided in FATA since 2001. 22 x permanent Medical Camps are working round the clock. Besides, 209 General Duty Medial Officers (GDMO), 177 Specialists and 8 Free Eye Camps have been established to provide quality med care to the tribals at their door steps. About 0.56 Mn patients have been treated during the said med camps up to 15 May 07 including about 0.1 Mn female patients. Moreover, financial assistance on account of medical treatment has also been provided to certain needy people of FATA. Medicines worth Rs. 53 Mn have been provided free of cost to the patients visiting these Camps. EM Equipment worth Rs 4.15 Mn has been provided to Eye Department CMH Peshawar for provision of special treatment to patient referred from other hospitals.
  55. 55. 55 FATA DEVELOPMENT SUMMARY FATA ADP – 06/07 Ongoing Schemes New Scheme Total Scheme %age Nos Funds Nos Funds Nos Funds Type ● Education 204 1034.000 33 266.000 237 1300.000 21 ● Health 75 430.000 19 18.000 94 558.000 9 ● Public Health Engineering 66 234.000 14 76.000 80 310.000 5 ● Communication 156 997.000 23 181.000 179 1178.000 19 ● Housing 30 72.000 5 9.000 35 81.000 1.3 ● Power 28 111.000 9 49.000 37 160.000 2.6 Agriculture ▬ Agriculture Extension 36 112.000 11 10.521 47 122.521 1.98 ▬ Agriculture Livestock & 45 82.000 8 15.479 53 97.479 1.57 Dairy Development Total Agriculture 81 194.000 19 26.000 100 220.000 3.5
  56. 56. 56 FATA DEVELOPMENT SUMMARY FATA ADP – 06/07 Type Ongoing Schemes New Scheme Total Scheme %age Nos Funds Nos Funds Nos Funds ● Forests ▬ Forestry 60 174.616 1 2.000 61 176.616 2.85 ▬ Sericulture 15 13.495 1 2.000 16 15.495 0.25 ▬ Wild Life 1 0.450 0 0.000 1 0.450 0.01 ▬ Fisheries 10 5.439 2 2.000 12 7.439 0.12 Total Forests 86 194.00 4 6.00 90 200.000 3.2 ● Rural Development 14 83.000 1 10.000 15 93.000 1.5 ● Regional Development 35 250.000 17 700.000 52 950.000 15.3 ● Irrigation 44 495 19 205.000 63 700.000 11.3 ● Minerals 11 86.000 6 164.000 17 250.000 4 ● Industries/Tech Education 39 160.000 4 40.000 43 200.000 3.2 Total FATA ADP (2006-2007) 869 4340.000 173 1860.000 1042 6200.000 100
  57. 57. 57 FATA DEVELOPMENT OVER ALL PROGRESS – AGENCY WISE (GHQ PH-I & II, ADP, HADP-I, NAS-I, II, DEF RDS, PDP) KAR AIZE CHILDREN PARKS DUG WELLS MHPS/ *SUBMER SIBLE PUMPS TUBE WELLS HAND PUMPS WATER SUP SCHEMES BASIC HEALTH SCHOOLS / COLLEGE BT ONLY (incl) RDS/ TRS P C P C P C P C P C P C P C P C P C P C P C AGENCY MOHMAND 187 172 19 3 - - - - 6 6 140 138 7 7 - - 6 6 - - - - KHYBER 204 150 75 25 7 7 - - 6 6 162 160 7 6 10 10 2 2 - - - - ORAKZAI 168 154 38 19 11 11 2 2 3 3 208 187 - - - - - - - - - - KURRAM 203 180 68 38 4 4 - - 2 1 193 168 1 - - - 1 1 - - - - NWA 531 453 304 25 5 5 - - 1 1 273 216 6 6 *2 *2 19 17 - - 5 1 SWA 619 512 323 59 6 6 1 1 7 4 193 118 6 6 - - 36 27 16 16 4 4 TOTAL 1912 1634 827 169 33 33 3 3 25 21 1169 987 27 26 12 12 64 53 16 16 9 5
  58. 58. 58 FATA DEVELOPMENT TAAP PROJECTS - NWA Projects Estimated Length Cost of Project (Rs in M) ● Improvement and BT of Road Miran Shah – Datta Khel 20 60.000 ● Construction and BT of Road Ghulam Khan – Titti Meda Khel 40 120.000 ● Construction and BT of Road Ghulam Khan – Bangidar 11 33.000 ● Widening and BT of Road Baba Ziarat – Assar – Inzar Kass 18 54.000 ● Widening and BT of Road Dwa Toi – Mira Din – Gurbaz 31 63.000 ● Improvement and BT of Road Razmak – Gharium – Kam Sham – Link Mandi Wam 55 165.000 ● Const and BT of Road Sinwam – Datta Khel – Kuram Garhi Road Gharium – Madamir Killi 30 73.940 ● Track Bermand – Ghariamai Fort 7 3.000 ● Track Faqiran CP – Madak Khel Killi – Gharlamai 21 21.500 ● Construction of Primary School at Barmand - 1.30 Total (Roads/Tracks) 243 624.740
  59. 59. 59 Cost of Project (Rs in M) FATA DEVELOPMENT Estimated TAAP PROJECTS - SWA Projects Length Construction of Track Zatrai – Kaniguram 12 24.000 Construction of Track Ospana Raghzai – Grodki – Shandankai 8 16.000 Mela – Warghoro Improvement of Track Nano – Biland Khel 11 22.000 Improvement and BT of Road Kotkai – Karama – Kaniguram 30 90.000 Const and BT of Road Inzar Tang – Zhawar Killi – Spin Mela – 42 (9) 126.000 Laddha Improvement and BT of Road Sargodha – Makeen 25 75.000 Improvement Track Sargodha – Jala Khel 22 44.000 Construction and BT of Road Ahmed Wam – Jannata – Shaktoi 23 69.000 Construction and BT of link Road Paiza Raghzai – Zangara 10 30.000 Construction and BT of Road Jannata – Sammal 30 90.000 Construction and BT of Road Makeen – Lattaka – Shaktoi – Mandi 60 120.000 Wam – Karkan Wam Construction and BT of Road Boya Ghundakai – Sparkai Nawai Kot 4 12.000 Construction of Road Zaterai – Ghli Pangai – Dilla Khulla 4 8.000
  60. 60. 60 FATA DEVELOPMENT TAAP PROJECTS - SWA Projects Estimated Length Cost of Project (Rs in M) Construction of Link Road Zafar Khel 3 6.000 Construction of Link Road Danday Ghundakai 1 2.000 BT Road Zamchan – Angoor Adda 16 12.80 Maintenance of Track Mantoi Bash Murad Base 4 1.65 WSS Janata - 2.000 Basic Health Unit Janata - 2.000 WSS Kamkai Raghzai - 2.000 Total 272 754.450 G.Total 515 7379.79
  61. 61. 61 • President’ Special Development Package • Ministry Of Kana and Safron Package • Annual Development Plan 2004/2005 RS 509 M RS 657 M RS 6.2 B • Annual Development Plan 2005/2006 • Special Development Package – 11 Corps RS 7.2 B RS 4.2 B • Narcotics Affairs Section US $ 23.5 M • Humanitarian Aid Development Programme US $ 1.5 M • Development of Medical Infrastructure US $ 3.32 M Total Rs. 18.7 B US $ 28.32 M DEVELOPMENT WORKS IN FATA FINANCIAL OUTLAY
  62. 62. 62 DEVELOPMENT IN SINDH PROVINCE General ● Starting from FY 2003-04, when the total Annual Development Programme (ADP) was Rs 11 billion, it was taken to Rs 18 billion in 2004-05 and it was further taken to Rs 24 billion in 2005-06. The net increase comes to 118% in two years. ● Rs 117 billion were earmarked for development in Sindh in 2005-06. The overall development outlay was Rs 38.22 billion which including:- ▬ Annual Development Programme (ADP) Rs. 24 billion. ▬ Provincial ADP Rs 17.2 billion and District ADP was Rs 6.78 billion. ▬ Foreign Project Assistance (FPA) Rs 4.75 billion. ▬ Federally Financed Projects Rs 9.474 billion. Karachi Uplift Plan ● Tameer–e- Karachi Package was announced by the President in Aug 2003. By now all the Schemes undertaken through this package are in various stages of completion. ● During 2005-06, 22 x schemes of water supply, 39 x schemes of sewerage, 31 Roads and Bridges have been initiated.
  63. 63. 63 DEVELOPMENT IN SINDH PROVINCE ● Federal Govt has provided Rs. 1.08 billion upto 2005-06 whereas Rs. 700 million is allocation in Public Sector Development Programme (PSDP) in 2006-07 for 7 schemes initiated under Tameer-e-Karachi Programme. ● With the assistance of Federal Govt K-III Proj has been completed and recently the President of Pakistan has inaugurated the project. Karachi city is getting additional 100 mgd of filtered water. The distribution work and improvement in the system will continue during next financial year. In addition to the Karachi Package the other federally funded schemes are nearing completion including Karachi Northern Bypass and Lyari Express Way.
  64. 64. 64 DEVELOPMENT IN SINDH PROVINCE Irrigation and Water Management • Sindh’s economy is inextricably linked with greater water available which needs to be provided through a more robust water management. • Govt has given serious attention to irrigation and water management in 2004-05, the overall planned investment in this sector was Rs. 888.95 million, which was scaled up by over 23% to Rs 1.1 billion in 2005-06. • For the 2006-2007 Rs. 1.5 billion has been earmarked for irrigation. • The most important initiative undertaken by Govt towards water management is setting up of a Small Dams Corporation for construction of Small Dams in Sindh.
  65. 65. 65 DEVELOPMENT IN SINDH PROVINCE Agriculture Sector ● The development budget of the Agriculture Sector for 2006-07 has been inc by 103%. Forest, Wildlife and CDA Sectors have been raised by 23%. Under Agriculture some important initiatives incl :- ▬ Production of energy and conversion of saline water into sweet water at various locations in the coastal belt at an estimated cost of Rs. 200 million. ▬ Establishment of New Sabzi Mandies with Cold Storages. ▬ Promote “White Revolution” estb Cattle Colonies and Dairy Villages to meet local export reqs with Rs 399 million. ▬ Provision of landing platform, chilling storage and processing facilities at zero point Badin, Keenjhar lake Thatta, Manchar Lake Dadu and Jetty at Karachi Fish Harbour. ▬ Provision Of Fishing Gears, Modification of Boats. Provision of Ice Boxes and Plastic Crates To Fishrmen In Sindh with estimated cost of Rs. 395 Million. ▬ Sindh Coastal and Inland Community Development Project with the assistance of ADB at an estimated cost of Rs. 2.4 billion from current year. ▬ To overcome water constraints, Govt is introducing new technologies of Drip and Sprinkler irrigation through a new project, “High Efficiency Irrigation System” .
  66. 66. 66 DEVELOPMENT IN SINDH PROVINCE Road Infrastructure in Urban and Rural Areas ● In 2004-05 Provincial Govt spent over Rs. 2.627 billion, which completed 25 schemes 433 km length of rds was improved while 292 km long rds were const. In addition, Rs. 1 billion were spent in completion of another 8 schemes for the mineral development sector. ● Important road net work has also been developed in Mirpurkhas and Thar Districts linking Islamkot to Nagarparkar for boosting economic activity in the area. Federal Govt has provided asst of Rs 1 billion for development of infrastructure in Thar and adjoining Areas for facilitating mineral development. ● Some major projects under development are:- ▬ Construction of road from Gorah to Nagarparker. ▬ Construction of road from Kalor to Diplo via Luss Farm. ▬ Construction of road from Guddu along Patt Feeder Cannal upto RD Shahi Wah upto Border of Balochistan. ▬ Construction of road from Chachchro-Veerah Wah via Sakrio. ▬ Improvement / Const of Mirpurkhas Chore road along Railway Line. ▬ Construction of road from Jalo-Jo-Chaunro to Khokhrapar. ▬ Construction t / improvement of road from Sorah to Jamro Head Works.
  67. 67. 67 DEVELOPMENT IN SINDH PROVINCE ● For coming year, Govt would be investing around 6.5 billion in the road sector. Water and Electricity ● Under Water and Sanitation Department some of the schemes under execution are :- ▬ There are presently 8 schemes costing Rs. 2.61 billion in various stages of execution. ▬ Last FY’s allocation for these schemes was Rs. 395.67 million, which has been increased to Rs. 635 million for 2006-07. ▬ Local Govt Department plans to rehabilitate the existing water and sanitation schemes in different towns of Sindh for which be O&M budget is being raised to Rs. 1 billion from the current year’s Rs. 543 million. ▬ Many schemes are under implementation with Federal Govt assistance include water and drainage schemes Mirpurkhas, Jacababad and Chokti. ▬ Three water supply schemes in Thar are being implemented through Army with technical support of PHE at the cost of Rs. 649.84 million. ▬ Under Prime Minister’s Thar Package two Water Supply Schemes and one Drainage Scheme is under execution with a cost of Rs. 486.963 million.
  68. 68. 68 DEVELOPMENT IN SINDH PROVINCE Health – Service structure of the paramedical staff in Sindh has been improved by upgrading their scales for facilitating better remuneration and benefits to them. This would have a budgetary implication of Rs. 80 million approximately. – An amount of Rs. 100 million has been provided in the budget to provide incentive to the doctors for posting in rural area. – Major hospitals in the province are being equipped with modern machinery for improving the diagnostic capability of the public hospitals. Lithography machines, Angiography and Angioplasty machinery, MRI and CT Scanners are being provided to different teaching hospitals in the Province. – A Cancer Hospital is being established with the help of Pakistan Atomic Energy Commission for which a plot at the cost of Rs. 3.5 million has been procured and handed over to PAEC for establishment of a Cancer Hospital at Nawabshah. – Accident Emergency & Ancillary Services Complex is being set up at Civil Hospital Karachi through Federal financing at a cost of Rs. 1.43 billion. Similar units will be established in PMCH Nawabshah, Liaquat University Hospital & Gambat Institute of Medical Sciences through ADP.
  69. 69. 69 DEVELOPMENT IN SINDH PROVINCE Education Programme • Govt has been working on a reform agenda with focus on:- – Improvement in enrolment of teachers and their posting on merit, improving the school administration through greater participation of school management communities and enhanced non-salary inputs. – Improvement in the incentive programme including free textbooks and stipends for girls students and to monitor all activities through a more scientific and credible system. – With a view to bring the salary of the teachers in rural areas at par with those posted in urban areas, Govt has decided to extend a Remote Area Allowance to the Primary School Teachers posted in rural areas at a cost of Rs. 1.1 billion approximately to encourage available of teachers in rural areas.
  70. 70. 70 DEVELOPMENT IN SINDH PROVINCE ● Education Sector Reform Programme with the assistance of World Bank :- ▬ A dedicated Reforms Unit is operational ▬ Under Access Reforms ▬ 100% delivery of Stipends through Pakistan Post. ▬ 300,000 girls in class VI to class X to get scholarship. ▬ 4.2 million children in class 1 to 10 to get free textbooks. ▬ Closed schools being re-opened. ▬ Up-gradation of over 1200 Primary schools & middle schools. ▬ Massive rehabilitation programme of Rs 2.3 billion under process. ▬ Governance Reforms. ▬ Teacher Recruitment Policy being reformed. ▬ Posting of EDO Education on merit.
  71. 71. 71 DEVELOPMENT IN SINDH PROVINCE Women Empowerment ● Women empowerment is the corner-stone of Govt policy. The provincial Women Development Department has evolved various interventions for facilitating gender equality and socio economic empowerment of women in Sindh in this respect there are various initiatives includes:- ▬ Multiple programme for skill development of women and establishment of various centres such as the Sales and Display Resource Centre at Karachi for facilitating economic upliftment, a Crisis Den for Women in distress at Karachi and a Media Cell for disseminating women issues. ▬ Gender Reforms Action Plan (GRAP) has been approved at a cost of Rs. 308.67 million for promoting equal participation of women at all levels of governance and a Women Political School is being set up for improving effectiveness of elected women councilors at grass root levels.
  72. 72. 72 ARMY’S ASSISTANCE - DEV IN SINDH PROVINCE ● Rehabilitation of Sukkar Barrage – Army Engineers undertook the Herculean task of timely repair of Sukkur Barrage otherwise it would have had devastating effects on the Agricultural land of the Province and the city of Sukkur itself. – Rs. 130 million were saved from initial estimated cost of Rs. 887 million. – Sukkur Barrage irrigates 7 million acres of area through its 7 Canals. The work on Sukkur Barrage started on Nov 25,2004. A task force of the Corps of Engineers was formed to undertake this project. – The project was completed 7 days ahead of the deadline before onset of the monsoon 2005 and a disaster was averted. • Chhor Water Supply Scheme – Pak Army is maintaining 4 water supply lines In order to provide sweet water in far flung areas of Thar desert. – A dedicated manpower is employed to run and maintain the schemes round the clock throughout year. – These schemes provide sweet water to far flung areas of Thar and Badin, while other areas are Shaheen Kot, Umer Kot, Ratnaur, Kunri, Chachro, Sunnigunni, Rahim Ki Bazar. – The main source of water is from main canals, water channels and tube wells in green belt. – Water treatment is also carried out to ensure healthy and hygienic water supply. – The storage capacity is more than fifty five Lac at one line and the water is supplied sufficiently to the farthest residents/populace in the far flung areas.
  73. 73. 73 ARMY’S ASSISTANCE TO MINISTRY OF EDUCATION (MoE) ● MoE on the directive of the President had requested for Army’s assistance in provision of missing facilities to primary / elementary schools in the country including AJ&K, FATA and Northern Areas (NAs) through a five years plan ● For 2006/07, survey in 19 x Districts (including 6 x Districts of Punjab) was carried out. However, in Punjab, the Programme has been taken over by NLC with the approval of MoE. ● After disengaging from Punjab, Army is implementing the Programme in 13 x districts of Sindh, NWFP, Balochistan, AJ&K FATA and NAs. During 2006/07 a total of 985 x schools would be provided missing facilities with an estimated cost of Rs 1370.00 Million ● The work is likely to be completed by Nov 2007. Concurrently, survey process has already been initiated in 25 x districts for next FY i.e. 2007/08
  74. 74. 74 ARMY’S ASSISTANCE TO NATIONAL VOCATIONAL AND TECH EDN COMMISSION (NAVTEC) ● All Corps HQs have initiated a programme of assisting NAVTEC in developing vocational training facilities across the Country ● The basic purpose of established technical and vocational training institutes with the support of Pak Army is to optimize utilization of aval infrastructure, technical know-how and talent pool available with the Army for enhancing technical education opportunities for common people ● Following Institutes have been established:- Institute Number of Students Completed In progress • Lahore Institute of Technical Education 808 47 • Lahore CMH Medical College - 100 • Balochistan Institute of Technical Education, Quetta - 292 • Khyber Institute of Technical Education, Peshawar 106 126
  75. 75. 75 ARMY’S ASSISTANCE – EARTHQUAKE / ERRA ● In the absence of any institutional response mechanism in the country, the Army responded with utmost speed, despite own losses, The move and deployment of around 50000 troops within first few days of the disaster, immediate utilization of all available assets and timely deployment of medical resources are a testimony to the professional brilliance and commitment of the Armed Forces ● Ongoing efforts by Army and its envisaged character in earthquake affected areas of AJ&K and NWFP is quite challenging and seeks for futuristic and reliable measures to accomplish this noteworthy job in an orderly and apt manner which including rehabilitation, payment of financial aid to deserving and genuine affectees, extending medical facilities, maintaining security, law and order affairs in the area and security of the NGOs / VIPs ● During the post earthquake period, Army, as lead agency in collaboration, cooperation and teamwork with number of NGOs, Govt Departments / Organizations and volunteers has demonstrated an impressive, dependable and steady approach towards relief, reconstruction and rehabilitation efforts in earthquake struck areas. ● Pakistan Army, through its sustained efforts, vows to bring the sufferers out of the tragic moments they have faced and return them to a blissful and natural life.
  76. 76. 76 ARMY’S ASSISTANCE – EARTHQUAKE - 2005 ARMY ASSESTS DEPLOYED • DIVISION HEADQUARTERS - 3 • BRIGADE GROUPS - 16 • ENGINEER BATTALIONS - 18 • CIVIL ARMED FORCES (WINGS) - 5 • ANIMAL TRANSPORT UNITS - 3 • MILITARY POLICE UNITS - 2 • HELICOPTERS - 30 TOTAL STRENGTH DEPLOYED - 60,211
  77. 77. 77 ARMY’S ASSISTANCE – EARTHQUAKE - 2005 Relief provided by the Army • TENTS - 867627 • BLANKETS - 5569803 • RATIONS - 73484.24 TONS • MEDICINES - 1803.47 TONS • MISCELLANEOUS - 30941.56 TONS
  78. 78. 78 FLOOD RELIEF OPERATIONS - 2007 SINDH & BALOCHISTAN AFFECTED AREAS Balochistan Sindh •Turbat •Gwadar •Pasni •Ormara •Awaran •Bela •Uthal •Khuzdar •Kharan •Jhal Magsi •Naseerabad •Jaffarabad •Bolan •Sibi •Nushki •Moenjodaro •Warah •Kamber •Shahdadkot •Larkarna •Mirpurkhas •Sanghar •Dadu •Mehr •Faridabad • Total Troops Employed : 15000 (+) • Relief Operations commenced :- By Navy (Seaward) : 24 Jun By Army : 28 June • Rescue Operations 50,000 people have been rescued 57,820 patients have been treated • Rel Effort 861 Helicopters Sorties Flown 117 C-130 Sorties Flown 45,000 Tents 2,000 Tons of Rations 22,563 Water Bottles
  79. 79. 79 ● Ratio of Defence Budget BUDGET ▬ Although Defence Budget has increased by Rs. 25,000 billion, the ratio of Defence Budget has reduced by 4.3 %. ▬ Defence Budget had shown upward trend till 2004-05. ▬ Since 2004-05 it showed a downward pattern but reduction in 2006/07 budget has been very large. ● Army Budget Expenditure  Army budget is a maintenance budget. At an average 80% is used for maintenance of its manpower, equipment and operating costs.  While only 20% is used for procurement of equipment and ordinance items. ● Reimbursement  Out of overall allocation, Army returns about 4 to 5 billion back to the Govt exchequer in the form of taxes, GST, import duties etc.
  80. 80. 80 BUDGET ● Why pension Budget is outside Army? ▬ Throughout the World pension budget is kept outside Defence Budget. ▬ A soldier once employed has to be paid from Defence Budget but after retirement since his services are no more utilized by Defence, he becomes a State liability for payment of pension. Same is true in case of other Ministries where people after retirement fall back on central pension head for Federal Employees. ▬ Pension budget regardless of its head is debited to the same exchanger ie National Budget. ● Why One-Line Budget for Defence? ▬ One line budget has been kept for the purpose of security. ▬ Actually it is not one line budget. As defence budget allocation also includes an element of Foreign Exchange, hence practically the allocation to Defence is in two parts ie Local Currency and Foreign Exchange allocation. ▬ It is subdivided in different Services by Ministry of Defence into various heads while allocating to the Services. ▬ Defence expenditures are governed by Financial Regulations and monitored/ accounted for by MAG (Military Accountant General) a senior grade 21/22 officer of Accounts. ▬ All expenditures are subject to internal and external audit and draft paras are also scrutinized by PAC (Public Accounts Committee).
  81. 81. 81 PAKISTAN NATIONAL/DEFENCE & ARMY BUDGET Def as % of GDP Army budget % in National & Def budget % of Def Budget %age of National Budget Army Budget % of National Budget Defence Budget National FY Budget 2001-2002 751 131 17% 63.8 8% 49% 3.4 2002-2003 742 146 20% 66.6 9% 46% 3.3 2003-2004 828 175 21% 81.2 10% 46% 3.3 2004-2005 903 194 21% 85.7 9% 44% 3.3 2005-2006 1099 224 20% 96.4 9% 43% 3.2 2006-2007 1315 250 19% 107.9 8% 43% 2.9 2007-2008 1874 275 14.67% 118 6.3% 43.21% > 3 * * Approximate – calculated at the end of fiscal year
  82. 82. 82 PAKISTAN NATIONAL/DEFENCE & ARMY BUDGET INDIAN NATIONAL /DEFENCE & ARMY BUDGET Def as % of GDP Army budget % in National & Def budget % of Def Budget %age of National Budget Army Budget % of National Budget National FY Defence Budget Budget 2005-2006 5061 830 16% 420.8 8% 49% 2.0 2006-2007 5816 860 15% 424.6 7% 49% 2.4 2007-2008 6805 960 14% 462.5 7% 48% 2.4
  83. 83. 83 COMPARISON DEFENCE BUDGET PAKISTAN AND INDIA YEAR PAKISTAN INDIA 2000 / 2001 US $ 3 Billion US $ 15.9 Billion 2003 / 2004 US $ 2.8 Billion US $ 15.5 Billion
  84. 84. 84 COMPARISON DEFENCE BUDGET 2007 / 2008 • Pakistan US $ 4.5 Billion • India US $ 23 Billion An increase of 19 % or US $ 3.67 Billion
  85. 85. 85 3 4 5 6 7 2006-2007 2005-2006 2004-2005 2003-2004 2002-03 2001-02 2000-01 1999-00 1998-99 1997-98 1996-97 1995-96 1994-95 1993-94 1992-93 1991-92 2007/2008 2.9 % PAKISTAN’S DEFENCE BBUUDDGGEETT -- %% OOFF GGDDPP 66..33 4.2 44..00 33..99
  86. 86. 86 ARMY’S CONTRIBUTION TO THE NATIONAL EXCHEQUER 3626.357 3489.011 3421.299 4404.141 17938.349 • 2001-2002 • 2002-2003 • 2003-2004 • 2004-2005 • 2005-2006 Total 2997.541 Rs IN MILLION
  87. 87. 87 2000 1800 1600 1400 1200 1000 800 600 400 200 0 2001- 2002 BUDGET 146 175 194 224 250 275 2002- 2003 2003- 2004 2004- 2005 2005- 2006 2006- 2007 2007- 2008 National Budget Defence Budget Army Budget 751 131 63.8 742 828 903 1099 1315 1874 66.6 81.2 85.7 96.4 107.9
  88. 88. 88 5061 960 860 830 462.5 424.6 402.8 National Budget Defence Budget Army Budget 6805 830 402.8 5816 6805 424.6 5816 960 860 462.5 BUDGET 8000 7000 6000 5000 4000 3000 2000 1000 0 5061 2007-2008 2006-2007 2005-2006
  89. 89. 89 900 850 800 750 700 650 600 DEFENCE BUDGET VIS-A-VIS DEVELOPMENT BUDGET in Rs. 550 (500 Expenditures 450 400 350 300 Current 250 200 150 100 50 0 1999-00 2000-01 2001-02 2002-03 2003-04 2004-05 2005-06 2006-07 Defence PSDP Social Sector & Poverty Related Expenditure Total on Development Billion) Years
  90. 90. 90 WORLD WIDE MILITARY EXPENDITURES Country Military Exp - $ Budget Period United States $ 466 billion FY04 actual China $ 65.0 billion 2004 Russia $ 50.0 billion France $ 45.0 billion 2005 United Kingdom $ 42.8 billion 2005 estimate (est). Japan $ 41.75 billion 2007 Germany $ 35.1 billion 2003 Italy $ 28.2 billion 2003 South Korea $ 21.1 billion 2003 est. India $ 19.0 billion 2005 est. Saudi Arabia $ 18.0 billion 2005 est. Turkey $ 12.2 billion 2003 Brazil $ 9.9 billion 2005 est.
  91. 91. 91 COMPARISON BASIC PAY SCALE 2006-07 Basic Pay Scale w.e.f. 01-07-2005 1998-99 Basic Pay Scale w.e.f 01-06-1994 BPS Minimum Maximum Mean Minimum Maximum Mean (%)age Real Increase in Salary (%)age Change In Salary 1 1245 1770 1508 2150 4100 3125 107 54 2 1275 1935 1605 2200 4450 3325 107 54 3 1320 2070 1695 2275 4825 3550 109 56 4 1360 2230 1795 2345 5345 3845 114 61 5 1400 2390 1895 2415 5865 4140 118 65 6 1440 2535 1988 2485 6235 4335 119 66 7 1480 2695 2088 2555 6755 4655 123 70 8 1540 2860 2200 2655 7155 4905 123 70 9 1605 3060 2333 2770 7720 5245 125 72 10 1660 3265 2463 2865 8415 5640 129 76 11 1725 3465 2595 2980 8980 5980 130 77 12 1830 3780 2805 3155 9905 6530 133 80 13 1950 4110 3030 3365 10715 7040 132 79 14 2065 4480 3273 3565 11815 7690 135 82 15 2190 4845 3518 3780 12930 8355 137 84 16 2535 5490 4013 4375 14575 9475 136 83
  92. 92. 92 COMPARISON BASIC PAY SCALE 2006-07 Basic Pay Scale (01-07-2005) 1998-99 Basic Pay Scale (01-06-1994) BPS Minimum Maximum Mean Minimum Maximum Mean (%)age Real Increase in Salary (%)age Change In Salary 17 3880 7360 5620 7140 17840 12490 122 69 18 5085 8745 6915 9355 22855 16105 133 80 19 7750 11600 9675 14260 28360 21310 120 67 20 9195 13595 11395 16915 32245 24580 116 63 21 10190 15640 12915 18750 35970 27360 112 59 22 10900 17000 13950 20055 40215 30135 116 63 Note: inflation during July 1999 and until April 2007 increased by 53.0 percent.
  93. 93. 93 PAKISTAN’S CONTRIBUTION TO UN PEACEKEEPING OPERATIONS • Pakistan became a member of United Nations soon after its independence on 14 August 1947 and committed itself to upholding the principles of UN Charter. • Pakistan has always endeavoured to provide maximum possible support to maintain peace and stability around the world and has been at the forefront in international peacekeeping missions around the globe. • Pakistan firmly believes in the purposes and principles of the UN Charter and its contribution to UN peacekeeping has been as wide ranging as the varied cultural, geographic, political and security conditions in which it had to operate. • Pakistan's participation in peacekeeping activities of the United Nations reflects its belief in the brotherhood of mankind and its commitment to peace across the globe. • In pursuance of this commitment, 98 Pakistani peacekeepers have so far laid down their lives, which come to about two men per year for peace and tranquility of the world. • Presently, Pakistan is the largest contributor to UN peacekeeping missions around the world.
  94. 94. 94 PAST MISSIONS • UN Operation in Congo (ONUC) -1960-1964 • UN Security Force in New Guinea West Irian (UNSF) -1962-1963 • UN Yemen Observer Mission, Yemen (UNYOM) -1963-1964 • UN Transition Assistance Group in Namibia (UNTAG) - 1989-1990 • UN Iraq-Kuwait Observer Mission (UNIKOM) - 1991-2003 • UN Missions in Haiti (UNMIH) - 1993-1996 • UN Transitional Authority in Cambodia (UNTAC) -1992-1993 • UN Operations in Somalia (UNOSOM, UNITAF, - 1992-1995 UNOSOM II) • UN Protection Force in Bosnia (UNPROFOR) - 1992-1995 • UN Observer Mission in Liberia (UNOMIL) - 1993-1997 • UN Assistance Mission for Rwanda (UNAMIR) - 1993-1996 • UN Verification Mission in Angola (UNAVEM III) - 1995-1997 • UN Transitional Administration for Eastern Slovenia - 1996-1997 (UNTAES) • UN Mission of Observers in Prevlaka (UNMOP) - 1996-2002 • UN Mission in Support of East Timor (UNMISET) -1999-July 2005 • UN Mission in Sierra Leone (Sierra Leone) - 1999-Dec 2005 • UN Mission in Burundi (ONUB) - 2004-Dec 2006
  95. 95. 95 CURRENT MISSIONS •UN Mission in Kosovo – Headquarters Pristina - 1999 - to date – Pakistan has provided civilian police contingent comprising 115 x personnel. •UN Mission in Democratic Republic of Congo (MONUC) – Headquarters Kinshasa - August 2003 - to date – Pakistan started this Mission with a contribution of a battalion group comprising one infantry battalion and supporting elements. – The Mission has since been expanded and Pakistan has additionally contributed an infantry brigade group comprising three infantry battalions and a signal company. • UN Mission in Liberia (UNMIL) – Headquarters Monrovia - November 2003 - to date – Pakistan's contingent in Liberia consists of a sector headquarters, two infantry battalions, three engineer companies and a level II hospital. – An additional infantry battalion as “Quick Reaction Force” has been deployed with effect from December 2006.
  96. 96. 96 CURRENT MISSIONS • UN Mission in Ivory Coast (ONUCI) – Headquarters Abidjan July 2004 - to date – Pakistan has initially provided one transport company and one engineer company. – Last year, Pakistan has additionally contributed an infantry battalion. Besides, a Formal Police Unit, comprising 125x personnel being deployed. • UN Mission in Haiti – Headquarters Port au PrinceNovember 2004 - to date – Pakistan has contributed two companies of police units. • UN Mission in Sudan (UNMIS) – Headquarters KhartoumOctober 2005 - to date – Pakistan's contingent in Sudan, consists of a infantry battalion group, two aviation units, one transport company, level II hospital and 3x Aero Medical Evacuation Teams.
  97. 97. 97 SUDAN (1542) CONGO (3564) IVORY COAST (1114) KOSOVO (115) HAITI (250) CURRENT MISSIONS LIBERIA (2991) EAST TIMOR (200)
  98. 98. 98 CURRENT STRENGTH OF PAKISTANI PEACE KEEPERS IN UN MISSION Mission Strength • Haiti 250 • Kosovo 87 • Congo 3563 • Liberia 2991 • Sudan 1542 • Ivory Coast 1239 • East Timor 200 • Staff Officer/Observers 185 Total 10057
  99. 99. 99 MILITARY OBSERVERS / STAFF OFFICERS Mission Observers Staff Officers • Congo (DRC) 49 1 • Sierra Leone - 1 • East Timor 4 - • Liberia 17 13 • Georgia 12 - • Ivory Coast 11 9 • Western Sahara 8 - • Kosovo 1 - • Sudan 23 25 • UN Sectt, New York - 4 • West Africa - 1 • Haiti - 1 • Ethopia/Eriteria 5 - Total 130 55
  100. 100. 100 PAKISTANI CASUALTIES IN PEACEKEEPING OPERATIONS Mission Dead Wounded Total • Congo 6 6 12 • Somalia 42 71 113 • Bosnia 7 4 11 • Cambodia 2 3 5 • Haiti 2 2 4 • Western Sahara 1 1 2 • Kuwait 1 - 1 • Sierra Leone 26 - 26 • Eastern Slovenia - 1 1 • East Timor - 1 1 • UNMOGIP 2 - 2 • Georgia 1 - 1 • Ivory Coast 2 1 3 • Burundi 3 - 3 • Liberia - 1 1 • Sudan 1 - 1 Total 98 93 191
  101. 101. 101 UN MISSION HOSTED BY PAKISTAN UN Military Observers Group in India and Pakistan (UNMOGIP) 1949-to date UN India-Pakistan Observer Mission (UNIPOM) 1965-1966 UN Good Offices Mission in Afghanistan and Pakistan (UNGOMAP) 1988-1990
  102. 102. 102 PAKISTAN’S CONTRIBUTION TO UN PEACEKEEPING OPERATIONS PAKISTAN AIR FORCE (2001-2003) Specialty JCOs Airmen Total • Fire Fighters 8 16 24 • Drivers 2 4 6 • Fitters 4 2 6 • Met Assistants 11 5 16 • Air Traffic Controllers 14 10 24 Total 39 37 76 CIVIL ARMED FORCES PERSONNEL Mission Strength Total Past Mission Current Mission • Kosovo 690 115 805 • Haiti 500 250 750 • East Timor - 140 140 • Ivory Coast - 125 125 Grand Total 1190 630 1820
  103. 103. 103 26 PAKISTAN’S CONTRIBUTION TO UN PEACEKEEPING OPERATIONS 30 East Timor 26 15 14 36 20 51* Sudan Nil
  104. 104. 104 PAKISTAN’S CONTRIBUTION TO UN PEACEKEEPING OPERATIONS UN STANDBY ARRANGEMENT SYSTEM (UNSAS) • Pakistan is a signatory of Memorandum of Understanding (MOU) on UNSAS concluded in 1999. • The purpose of the MOU was to identify resources, which a country would be able to provide to the UN under specified conditions wherever requested. • Brigade Group plus size force has been pledged, Air Force and Navy assets have also been included. UN CAPACITY BUILDING • To undertake future UN requests on short notice, we are in the process of establishing exclusive “Ware Houses” having sufficient stocks of equipment and stores to equip a brigade group plus size force.
  105. 105. 105 ECONOMIC PERFORMANCE OF THE PRESENT GOVERNMENT A COMPARISON FROM THE PAST Real GDP Growth 2006-07 2005-06 2004-05 2003-04 1999-2002 1996-99 1988-89 7.0% 6.6 % 9.0 % 4.7% 2.9% Per Annum Total Investment (As % of GDP) 3.1% Per Annum 4.8% 2006-07 2005-06 2004-05 2003-04 1999-2002 1996-99 1988-89 23.0% 21.7% 19.1 % 16.6% 17.1% 16.9% 18.9% Growth in Industrial Production 2006-07 2005-06 2004-05 2003-04 1999-2002 1996-99 1988-89 8.8% 10.7% 19.9 % 18.1% 6.5% p.a 3.0% p.a 2.4% p.a Inflation 2006-07 2005-06 2004-05 2003-04 1999-2002 1996-99 1988-89 7.9% 7.9% 9.3 % 4.6% 3.8% 8.4% 10.4%
  106. 106. 106 ECONOMIC PERFORMANCE OF THE PRESENT GOVERNMENT A COMPARISON FROM THE PAST Revenue Collection (CBR) 1988-89 1996-99 2001-02 2003-04 2004-05 2005-06 2006-07 Rs 588.8 billion Rs 518 billion Rs 404 billion Fiscal Deficit (As % of GDP) Rs 835.0 billion Rs 712.8 billion Rs 308 billion Rs 91.0 billion 1988-89 1996-99 1999-2002 2003-04 2004-05 2005-06 2006-07 7.40% 6.7% Average 4.7% 2.4% 3.3 % 4.2% 4.2% Domestic Debt (As % of GDP) 1988-89 1998-99 2001-02 2003-04 2004-05 2005-06 2006-07 43.4% 49.4% 39.9% 35.7% 32.8 % 30.0% 28.4% Debt Servicing (As % of Total Revenue) 1988-89 1998-99 2001-02 2003-04 2004-05 2005-06 2006-07 33.5% 64.0% 58.3% 30.1% 30.4 % 27.8% 26.1% This is earthquake spending. Excluding earthquake spending fiscal deficit is 3.4 % of GDP Budgeted
  107. 107. 107 ECONOMIC PERFORMANCE OF THE PRESENT GOVERNMENT A COMPARISON FROM THE PAST External Debt & Liabilities 2006-07 2005-06 2004-05 2003-04 2002-03 1998-99 1988-89 $ 35.8 billion $ 35.3 billion $ 35.5 billion External Debt &Liabilities (As % of GDP) $38.9 billion $ 37.2 billion $ 38.9 billion $ 21.8 billion 2006-07 2005-06 2004-05 2003-04 2002-03 1998-99 1988-89 27.1% 29.4% 32.7 % 36.0% 42.6% 51.0% 66.3% External Debt & Liabilities as % of Foreign Exchange Earnings 2006-07 2005-06 2004-05 2003-04 2001-02 1998-99 1988-89 119.7% 120.1% 134.3 % 164.7% 236.8% 347.0% 278.9% Exports 2006-07 2005-06 2004-05 2003-04 2001-02 1998-99 1988-89 $13.9 billion $16.4 billion $14.4 billion $12.4 billion $9.1 billion $ 7.8 billion $ 4.7 billion July – April
  108. 108. ECONOMIC PERFORMANCE OF THE PRESENT GOVERNMENT 108 A COMPARISON FROM THE PAST 1988-89 1998-99 2001-02 2003-04 2004-05 2005-06 2006-07 1988-89 1998-99 1999-02 2003-04 2004-05 2005-06 2006-07 $ 4.2 $ 4.6billion $ 4.4 billion billion $ 3.9 billion $ 1.06 $ 2.4billion billion 1988-89 1998-99 2001-02 2003-04 2004-05 2005-06 2006-07 4160 million $3521 million $1524 million $949 million $ 484.7 million $ 376 million $ 210.2 million Foreign Direct Investment $ 1.9 billion Remittances $25.0 billion $ 24.6 billion $ 18.7 billion $ 13.6 billion $ 10.3 billion $ 7.0 $9.4 billion billion Imports July – April
  109. 109. 109 ECONOMIC PERFORMANCE OF THE PRESENT GOVERNMENT A COMPARISON FROM THE PAST Current Account Balance (As % of GDP) 2006-07 2005-06 2004-05 2003-04 1999-2002 1996-99 1988-89 -4.3% -4.5% -1.6% 1.3% 1.9% -4.5% -4.8 % Sufficient for 5 months of imports Sufficient for 5 months of imports Foreign Exchange Reserves Sufficient for 8 months of imports Sufficient for 9 months of imports Sufficient for 11 Months of imports Sufficient for 4-5 weeks of imports Sufficient to finance 2 ½ weeks of imports $13.8 billion $13.1 billion $12.6 billion 12.3 billion 11.08 billion $1.214 billion $0.389 billion 2006-07 (Apr) 2005-06 2004-05 2003-04 1999-2002 1998-99 1988-89 July – April
  110. 110. 110 ECONOMIC PERFORMANCE OF THE PRESENT GOVERNMENT A COMPARISON FROM THE PAST Stock Market (KSE Index) 12-Oct-99 30-06-2004 30-6-2005 30-06-2006 31-05-2007 1257 5279 7450 9989.4 9989.4 12-Oct-99 30-06-2004 30-6-2005 30-06-2006 31-05-2007 Rs. 334 billion Rs. 1403 billion Rs 2036.7 Rs 2766.4 Rs 3743.6 $34.3 $46.2 billion $61.7 billion billion $6.5 billion $24.1 billion Stock Market (Market Capitalization) This is earthquake spending. Excluding earthquake spending fiscal deficit is 3.4 % of GDP July – April Budgeted
  111. 111. 111 COMPARATIVE PERFORMANCE OF KEY ECONOMIC INDICATORS Unit 1999-00 2000-01 2001-02 2002-03 2003-04 2004-05 2005-06 2006-07 I Real Sector Real GDP Growth % 3.9 1.8 3.1 4.7 6.4 9.0 6.6 7.0 Agriculture % 6.1 -2.2 0.1 4.1 2.4 6.5 1.6 5.0 Large Scale Manuf % 1.5 11.0 3.5 7.2 18.1 19.9 10.7 8.8 Investment % of GDP 17.4 17.2 16.8 16.9 16.6 19.1 21.7 23.0 National Savings % of GDP 15.8 16.5 18.6 20.8 17.9 17.5 17.2 18.0 Inflation 3.6 4.4 3.5 3.1 4.6 9.3 7.9 7.9 Food Inflation % 2.2 3.6 2.5 2.9 6.0 12.5 6.9 10.2 Non Food Inflation % 4.7 5.1 4.3 3.2 3.6 7.1 8.6 6.2 Core Inflation % 4.4 4.2 3.6 2.6 3.7 7.6 7.5 6.0 Revenue Collection Billion Rs 346.6 396.4 403.9 461.6 518.8 591.0 713.0 835.0 (CBR) Fiscal Deficit % of GDP 5.4 4.3 4.3 3.7 2.4 3.3 4.2 4.2 Public Debt % of GDP 94.8 82.8 79.7 75.1 67.1 62.2 56.9 53.4 Of which foreign % of GDP 45.8 42.3 40.8 36.7 32.0 29.4 26.6 24.6 currency Denominated % of Total 63.8 57.0 511.1 35.7 31.3 30.4 27.8 26.1 Revenue Debt Servicing II. Fiscal Sector Budgeted End March
  112. 112. 112 COMPARATIVE PERFORMANCE OF KEY ECONOMIC INDICATORS III External Sector Exports (f.o.b) Billion $ 8.2 8.9 9.1 10.9 12.4 14.4 16.4 13.9 Imports (f.o.b) Billion$ 9.6 10.2 9.4 11.3 13.7 18.7 24.6 25.0 Trade Deficit Billion$ -1.4 -1.3 -0.3 -0.4 -1.3 -4.3 -8.2 -11.1 Remittances Billion$ 1.0 1. 2.4 4.2 3.9 4.2 4.6 4.4 Current Account %of GDP -1.6 -10.7 0.1 3.8 1.4 -1.6 -4.5 -4.3 Balance Foreign Direct Million $ 470.0 322.4 484.7 798.0 949.4 1524 3521 4160 Investment External Debt and Forex Billion $ 37.9 37.1 36.5 35.5 35.3 35.8 37.2 38.9 Liabilities Foreign Exchange Billion $ 1.3 3.2 6.3 10.7 12.3 12.6 13.1 13.8 Reserves IV Monetary & Capital Market Weighted Avg. Lending % 14.0 13.1 7.58 5.05 8.2 9.9 11.2 Rate Stock Market (KSE 1991-100 1521 1366 1770 3403 5279 7450.1 9989.4 12961.3 Index) Rs. 392 339 408 746 1357.5 2036.7 2766.4 3743.6 Billion $Billion 6.7 5.8 6.8 12.8 23.4 34.3 46.0 61.7 Market Capitalization Rs. 18.0 48.6 53.0 168.0 325.0 390.0 401.2 264.1 Billion Credit to Private Sector %of 297.2 259.5 236.8 181.2 164.7 134.3 120.1 119.7 Forex Earnings External Debt and Liabilities Billion$ -1.14 -0.51 1.34 3.17 1.31 -1.75 -7.3 -6.2 July – April End May End March

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