Robert Trahan & Anthony Pollock (How to Build a Dog House)
INTRO
(What is the purpose of this course?) <ul><li>A 1-day introduction into IFR Project Management requirements.  </li></ul><u...
<ul><li>AGENDA </li></ul><ul><li>Overview - 15 minutes </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Introduction </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Histo...
<ul><li>Gantt Chart Basics (1.5 Hours) </li></ul><ul><ul><li>- Phases </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>- Work Breakdown Structur...
What is A Project? <ul><ul><li>“ A  temporary  endeavor undertaken to create a unique product or service”* </li></ul></ul>...
What is Project Management? “ A management tool applying knowledge, skills, tools and techniques to project activities in ...
What is the difference between Project Management and Program Mgt. ? <ul><ul><li>Project management is the management of a...
(Why Do I need to learn Project Mgt.?) <ul><li>Provides a systematic, consistent method of organizing your work, which res...
IFR Project Requirements  (Elements of the Handbook)
Minimum Requirements for an IFR Project 1. Charter  FORM 2.  Team List w/Roles & Responsibilities  3.  Gantt Chart – Micro...
Charter  “ A document issued by senior management that provides the Project Manager with the authority to apply organizati...
TEAM ROLES (110nm Examples) <ul><li>SPONSOR (Frank Prein) </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Addresses high level conflict (including M...
<ul><li>INTEGRATION LEADER/Part Owner (Jon Davis) </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Resolves technical issues, weekly updates and upda...
Gantt Example <ul><li>Flow chart of project tasks or activities. </li></ul><ul><li>Necessary to understand relationships b...
MTA <ul><li>The Milestone Trend Analysis (MTA) is part of project  reporting .  </li></ul><ul><li>It is a graphical docume...
MTA Example
QR Project Charter
<ul><ul><li>Assumptions </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Examples:  </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Assumption - start or end dat...
<ul><ul><li>Background </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>“ Provide essential background information for this project.  Consider s...
<ul><li>IFR BE is closing </li></ul><ul><li>BE yield necessary for FE yield ramp, excursion containment and productivity i...
<ul><ul><li>Objective </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>“ Provide a brief, clear, non-technical description of the project’s over...
 
<ul><ul><li>Constraints/Exclusions </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>“ Factors that will limit the project management team’s opti...
 
Assumptions vs. Constraints  <ul><li>Can shift over the project life cycle.  “2 sides of the same coin” </li></ul><ul><li>...
<ul><ul><li>SCOPE </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Constraints & Objective are commonly referred to as the SCOPE * </li></ul></u...
<ul><ul><li>SCOPE vs. Mission Statement </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Mission statement is frequently misused as a project ob...
<ul><ul><li>NOW WE ARE READY TO BUILD A DOG HOUSE </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Project Title:  Fido’s House </li></ul></ul>
 
 
 
<ul><li>No Indoor Plumbing. No Air Conditioning. </li></ul><ul><li>No Walkway to Human House. </li></ul><ul><li>No Fire Hy...
<ul><ul><li>NOW  YOU   </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>ARE READY  </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>TO CHARTER  </li></ul></ul><ul><ul...
Project Charter – DDR2 Testing <ul><li>Assumptions: </li></ul><ul><li>We can order from MOSAID </li></ul><ul><li>We can’t ...
Building a Gantt Chart
<ul><li>Gantt Chart Basics </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Why do we use it? </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>In a most basic sense, it is...
<ul><li>Gantt Chart Basics </li></ul><ul><ul><li>What is a Gantt chart? </li></ul></ul>
<ul><li>Gantt Chart Basics - Terms </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Phases –  Clearly defined major elements of the project on a summ...
Project Phases For projects without predetermined phases, the phases or milestones can be defined through the following: <...
<ul><li>Gantt Chart Basics - Phases </li></ul><ul><ul><li>In the example of FIDO’s Castle, we have the following PHASES: <...
<ul><li>Gantt Chart Basics - Phases </li></ul><ul><ul><li>And the following Milestone definitions for each Phase: </li></u...
<ul><li>Gantt Chart Basics - Phases </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Within each Phase, there are a number of TASKS that must be acco...
<ul><li>Gantt Chart Basics - Phases </li></ul><ul><ul><li>In FIDO’s Castle, these are some of the TASKS that take place: <...
<ul><ul><li>How long will the TASK take to complete? </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>This is referred to as the “duration” ...
<ul><li>Gantt Chart Basics - Phases </li></ul><ul><ul><li>We now have the basic structure of a Gantt chart: </li></ul></ul...
<ul><li>Gantt Chart Basics - Phases </li></ul><ul><ul><li>But, since we need to complete the TASKS before the Milestone is...
<ul><li>Work Breakdown Structure (or WBS) </li></ul><ul><ul><li>The structure we have just created is also referred to as ...
<ul><li>Work Breakdown Structure (or WBS) </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Creation of a WBS for your project involves the following ...
<ul><li>Work Breakdown Structure (or WBS) </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Let’s create a WBS for one phase of FIDO’s castle: </li></...
<ul><li>Work Breakdown Structure (or WBS) </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Each sub-task can usually be broken down into other tasks....
<ul><li>Work Breakdown Structure (or WBS) </li></ul><ul><ul><li>NOTE:  Don’t get carried away with too much detail in your...
<ul><li>Preparing to Build The Project Plan </li></ul><ul><ul><li>With the WBS identified and built, you are now almost re...
<ul><li>Preparing to Build The Project Plan </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Recall that for each  TASK , we have identified the  act...
<ul><li>Preparing to Build The Project Plan – Task Dependencies </li></ul><ul><ul><li>There are 4 types of  dependencies  ...
<ul><li>Preparing to Build The Project Plan – Task Dependencies </li></ul>You can also add lag or lead times to dependenci...
<ul><li>Preparing to Build The Project Plan – Task Dependencies </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Now, we need to take our WBS that we...
<ul><li>Preparing to Build The Project Plan – Task Dependencies </li></ul><ul><ul><li>This is then depicted in Microsoft P...
<ul><li>Preparing to Build The Project Plan – Task Dependencies </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Before entering all the information ...
<ul><li>Preparing to Build The Project Plan – Build the WBS </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Build WBS For Students’ Projects At This...
Link to WBS spreadsheet
<ul><li>Microsoft Project Basics </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Transfer WBS outline from paper (or Excel…) into Microsoft Project....
Link to FIDO’s PROJECT
Link to FIDO’s PROJECT <ul><li>Microsoft Project Basics </li></ul><ul><li>Terms to Define: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Calendar ...
Link to FIDO’s PROJECT <ul><li>Microsoft Project Basics </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Calendar Base  ( P roject/Project Informatio...
Link to FIDO’s PROJECT <ul><li>Microsoft Project Basics </li></ul><ul><li>Task Types </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Fixed Units </l...
Link to FIDO’s PROJECT <ul><li>Fixed Units (Default)  {Units = Work ÷ Duration} </li></ul><ul><ul><li>A task in which the ...
Link to FIDO’s PROJECT <ul><li>Microsoft Project Basics </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Multiple Resources and Their Effects </li></...
Link to FIDO’s PROJECT <ul><li>Microsoft Project Basics </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Critical Path </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>The...
Link to FIDO’s PROJECT <ul><li>Microsoft Project Basics </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Baseline </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>The base...
Link to FIDO’s PROJECT <ul><li>Microsoft Project Basics </li></ul><ul><ul><li>We now have a Project Plan in Microsoft Proj...
MTA BASICS
MTA <ul><li>The Milestone Trend Analysis (MTA) is part of project  reporting , used to track and monitor the selected proj...
<ul><li>Project Example </li></ul><ul><li>Title: Building a Dog House “FIDO’s Castle” </li></ul><ul><li>Phases - Tasks </l...
MTA for FIDO
 
D11 Project MTA
MTA Maker Training
Click Here to open  MTA application
Introduction This is the screen that you will see when you first open the file.  There are several major sections to revie...
Some Milestone Basics There are some milestone and MTA basics that we should review before getting started. A milestone tr...
Milestone Entry Direct There are several ways to enter milestone information in MTA Maker.  The first and most direct is t...
Milestone Entry Dialog Box You can also click on the little arrow to pull down a list of the previously entered reporting ...
Completing Milestone Dialog Box Entry When you are set, click the Enter Update button to transfer the information from the...
Milestone Entry Dialog Box – Update All Select  Update All No Changes  to update all the milestones with the most recent c...
Milestone Entry Dialog Box – MS Project Select  Import From MS Project File  and click on  Enter Update  to open another d...
Action Buttons OK, now it’s time to create the chart.  As the buttons say, click “Create” to create a new chart from scrat...
Enter Comments This is what the chart will look like right after you click “create MTA”.  Now is a good time to enter comm...
Mini MTA for Publication It’s recommended that you copy and paste this MTA into other programs like Powerpoint.  You can c...
Questions and Comments <ul><li>Questions regarding the MTA Maker macro should be directed to IFPT IT department.  </li></u...
BUILD YOUR OWN MTA
SUMMARY
Minimum Requirements for an IFR Project - SUMMARY 1. Charter  FORM 2.  Team List w/Roles & Responsibilities  3.  Gantt Cha...
KEY ELEMENTS OF A CHARTER <ul><li>Assumptions </li></ul><ul><li>Background </li></ul><ul><li>Objective (S.M.A.R.T.)  </li>...
<ul><li>KEY POINTS TO MTA </li></ul><ul><li>MTA is a Reporting Tool </li></ul><ul><li>Use I.P.E.C.C. for Project Phases  <...
<ul><li>Resources </li></ul><ul><ul><li>MP Project Management Manual: </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>http:// goto.infineon.com...
Headline, one or two lines  Arial bold, 28 pt, line spacing 32 pt, purple <ul><li>Copy Arial, 20 pt, line spacing 26 pt, f...
Use of color in information graphics Headline Arial bold, 20 pt, line spacing 26 pt
Colors Purple R   82 / G   12 / B   130  Blue R   169 / G   213 / B   229  All colors to be used are  already preset in th...
Thank you The World’s Leading Creative Memory Company
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Qimonda Pm Foils

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Project Management Class

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  • ...well didn't quite work out then! Qimonda is bust long ago and the PM course was too ambitious for the Richmond folks anyway.
    Take away the following: MTAs are a fine thing - but if you do not explain to management how they work - the message turns against the PM.
    WBS is a fine thing too - but people need a lot of support to create a meaningful WBS. Usually they drift off and describe the useless stuff.
    BTW: What's the purpose of perfectly executing project if you do the wrong ones in the first place (deep trench).
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  • Qimonda Pm Foils

    1. 1. Robert Trahan & Anthony Pollock (How to Build a Dog House)
    2. 2. INTRO
    3. 3. (What is the purpose of this course?) <ul><li>A 1-day introduction into IFR Project Management requirements. </li></ul><ul><li>(Task-oriented Tools – Tangible) Emphasis on Project Planning , Scheduling and Reporting . </li></ul><ul><li>Working session where you develop your own Project Plan. </li></ul><ul><li>An IFR tailored version of the last day of the 3-day ATI PM class. </li></ul>(What this session isn’t?) <ul><li>No discussion of Project Management knowledge areas: Cost, Quality, Human Resources, Communication, Risk, Procurement </li></ul><ul><li>(Interpersonal Tools - Intangibles) No TEAM Building, Conflict Resolution, Interpersonal Skills. </li></ul><ul><li>No advanced training on PM Tools (MS Project/MTA/Enterprise Software/Primavera) </li></ul>
    4. 4. <ul><li>AGENDA </li></ul><ul><li>Overview - 15 minutes </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Introduction </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>History </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Definitions </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Handbook Review - 15 minutes </li></ul><ul><li>- Project </li></ul><ul><li>- Charter </li></ul><ul><li>- Team Roles </li></ul><ul><li>- Gantt Chart </li></ul><ul><li>- MTA </li></ul><ul><li>Reporting - 60 minutes </li></ul><ul><li>- Charter </li></ul><ul><li>- (Examples) </li></ul><ul><li>- Class Work - (Prepare Charter using Prework) </li></ul>
    5. 5. <ul><li>Gantt Chart Basics (1.5 Hours) </li></ul><ul><ul><li>- Phases </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>- Work Breakdown Structure </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Project example on Paper </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Lunch (~ 12noon to 1pm) </li></ul><ul><li>MS Project (1.0 to 1.5 hrs) </li></ul><ul><li> - MS Project Intro/Example </li></ul><ul><li> - MS project entry using class room examples (Max 2 Phases) </li></ul><ul><li>Break </li></ul><ul><li>MTA ( 1 Hour) </li></ul><ul><li>- Concept - Details </li></ul><ul><li>- Examples </li></ul><ul><li>- Live entry using class room example (Andy MTA) </li></ul><ul><li>Weekly Update (15 min) </li></ul><ul><li>Q&A/Survey </li></ul>
    6. 6. What is A Project? <ul><ul><li>“ A temporary endeavor undertaken to create a unique product or service”* </li></ul></ul>Project Definition A group of tasks geared toward the completion of a site-specific or corporate initiative requiring the use of resources from multiple departments. Elements a project might include: - More than 5 people - More than 2 departments - More than 25 tasks - Longer than 3 months - Connected to 6 month goals - Corporate Initiative <ul><ul><li>*PMBOK (Project Management Book of Knowledge) </li></ul></ul>
    7. 7. What is Project Management? “ A management tool applying knowledge, skills, tools and techniques to project activities in order to meet or exceed stakeholder needs and expectations from a project.”* *PMBOK
    8. 8. What is the difference between Project Management and Program Mgt. ? <ul><ul><li>Project management is the management of a single project. Program management is the management and coordination of a group of projects with a larger scope or impact. (may include ongoing operations, typically managed through a Project Office or Program Manager) </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Related Endeavors (Hierarchy) </li></ul><ul><li>Strategic Plan </li></ul><ul><li>Program </li></ul><ul><li>Project </li></ul><ul><li>Subprojects </li></ul>
    9. 9. (Why Do I need to learn Project Mgt.?) <ul><li>Provides a systematic, consistent method of organizing your work, which results in higher likelihood of success for your project. </li></ul><ul><li>Requirement – Staff recognized skill gap </li></ul><ul><li>Extension of Project Management initiative started 3/02 with Staff training and then Section Managers. </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Schedule & Balance workloads </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Identify bottlenecks </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Manage Critical Path </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Track and Balance resources </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Provides a simple and common format for presenting complex activities. “Clear Communication within a Cross-Functional Environment” </li></ul><ul><li>It works!!!! </li></ul>
    10. 10. IFR Project Requirements (Elements of the Handbook)
    11. 11. Minimum Requirements for an IFR Project 1. Charter FORM 2. Team List w/Roles & Responsibilities 3. Gantt Chart – Microsoft Project 4. MTA (Milestone Trend Analysis) Phases of Project 5. Regular Report – (Or Embedded in MTA)
    12. 12. Charter “ A document issued by senior management that provides the Project Manager with the authority to apply organizational resources to project activities” FORM
    13. 13. TEAM ROLES (110nm Examples) <ul><li>SPONSOR (Frank Prein) </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Addresses high level conflict (including MCH/DD issues), approves project start and completion. </li></ul></ul><ul><li>PROJECT LEADER (Bob Trahan) </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Updates Gant, weekly reporting – communication between Core Team and mgt/Munich, facilitates meeting, resolved team conflicts and sets priorities. Coordinate mask orders. Primary interface with Munich. WIP owner during Q. period . Identifies SQ HW. Lot tracking. Assigns lots for SWRs and owns all lots from process freeze until SQ is completed. Communication between FE and BE PROMIS flows. Communicates Q-team meeting issues to core team. Coordinates with assembly engineering. </li></ul></ul>
    14. 14. <ul><li>INTEGRATION LEADER/Part Owner (Jon Davis) </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Resolves technical issues, weekly updates and updates Gannt, Build and maintain FAB PROMIS flow . Primary interface with DD or Reference Site. Cooridinate POR, Short Loops. WIP owner during Development period . Assigns lots for SWRs and owns all lots from start to until process freeze. Provide Reliable, yielding process for SQ HW. Creates vintages. </li></ul></ul><ul><li>MODULE LEADER (Jon Davis, Walter Hartner, Befruz Tasbas, Michael Rennie, Raghu Gupta) </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Resolves within module issues. Provides schedule updates. Technical reference for module. Liaison between yield and unit process. Technical verification of task. Responsible for making sure that the unit process steps taken together provide the output required by the product. Provides feedback from experiments, lots etc to process owners. </li></ul></ul>TEAM ROLES (More 110nm Examples)
    15. 15. Gantt Example <ul><li>Flow chart of project tasks or activities. </li></ul><ul><li>Necessary to understand relationships between tasks/dependencies </li></ul><ul><ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Necessary to forecast time to completion of project </li></ul></ul></ul></ul></ul>
    16. 16. MTA <ul><li>The Milestone Trend Analysis (MTA) is part of project reporting . </li></ul><ul><li>It is a graphical document used to track and monitor the selected project. </li></ul><ul><li>In the MTA, the schedule situation of a project is represented graphically by means of important milestones. </li></ul><ul><li>The graphical representation provides timely indications of existing or potential issues. </li></ul><ul><li>The MTA reflects the current development status based on the milestones always with reference to the initial planning. </li></ul>
    17. 17. MTA Example
    18. 18. QR Project Charter
    19. 19. <ul><ul><li>Assumptions </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Examples: </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Assumption - start or end date. </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Assumption - Porto Cost/Piece will be affected </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Assumption - Porto capacity will be impacted by 5%. </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Assumption - SWR fails need to be held (TBD) </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Assumption - No $$$ or IT HW constraints </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>“ Unconfirmed, but known possibilities of events or conditions regarding a project’s environment such as factors that could be considered true, real or certain.” </li></ul></ul>
    20. 20. <ul><ul><li>Background </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>“ Provide essential background information for this project. Consider such events as “initiators”, which start the project. Include information which helps answer the question WHY?” </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Examples: </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Audit report, Departmental changes, Market trends, Technical innovations, Public policy, Litigation, a new Contract, etc. . </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Additional data like diagrams, schematics, maps, photos, statistical analysis, customer complaints, etc.“ </li></ul></ul></ul>
    21. 21. <ul><li>IFR BE is closing </li></ul><ul><li>BE yield necessary for FE yield ramp, excursion containment and productivity improvements </li></ul><ul><li>Management requirement – Porto BE chosen </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Background for RICHTOP project </li></ul></ul>
    22. 22. <ul><ul><li>Objective </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>“ Provide a brief, clear, non-technical description of the project’s overall central objective or requirement. “ </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>SMART – Specific, Measurable, Achievable, Relevant, Timed. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Examples: </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>“ Develop a prototype mouse trap for the consumer market. The completion data for this project is June 1, 2002.” </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>The Core team will enable IFR to complete SQ milestone X5 for the D11 product by the end of February 2003. </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>The Core team will enable IFR to complete Shipment Qualification (SQ) for the D11 product by 4 months after reference site SQ (currently 2/28/2003 for IFR SQ). </li></ul></ul></ul>
    23. 24. <ul><ul><li>Constraints/Exclusions </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>“ Factors that will limit the project management team’s options.” Examples: predefined budget, contractual provisions. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>“ What we will not provide.” Example: Changes to original scope with regard to content of materials will be an additional charge. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Examples: </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>It will also meet all relevant OSHA and EPA regulations. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>It will be 95% effective and can be produced at a cost of less than $2.00. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Meet target requirements for reliability. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Achieve a yield at least equivalent to the reference site’s yield at its SQ. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Have a roadmap to ramp to full capacity by 3 to 5 months after SQ. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>The transferred process will be synchronized to the reference site with exceptions documented. </li></ul></ul>
    24. 26. Assumptions vs. Constraints <ul><li>Can shift over the project life cycle. “2 sides of the same coin” </li></ul><ul><li>An initial Assumption, once confirmed can become a constraint or a non-issue. </li></ul><ul><li>Example: Pine Wood Derby Track Width. </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Early in project – it is unknown and assumed. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Later – receive spec and must constrain build dimension! </li></ul></ul>
    25. 27. <ul><ul><li>SCOPE </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Constraints & Objective are commonly referred to as the SCOPE * </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>The Scope of a project should represent the total amount of work required to complete the project. </li></ul></ul>
    26. 28. <ul><ul><li>SCOPE vs. Mission Statement </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Mission statement is frequently misused as a project objective or scope. A mission statement refers to the overriding strategic objective of an ongoing organization or campaign. </li></ul></ul>
    27. 29. <ul><ul><li>NOW WE ARE READY TO BUILD A DOG HOUSE </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Project Title: Fido’s House </li></ul></ul>
    28. 33. <ul><li>No Indoor Plumbing. No Air Conditioning. </li></ul><ul><li>No Walkway to Human House. </li></ul><ul><li>No Fire Hydrant. </li></ul>
    29. 34. <ul><ul><li>NOW YOU </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>ARE READY </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>TO CHARTER </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>YOUR PROJECT </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Project Title: XXXXX </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Project Mgr. YOU </li></ul></ul>
    30. 35. Project Charter – DDR2 Testing <ul><li>Assumptions: </li></ul><ul><li>We can order from MOSAID </li></ul><ul><li>We can’t buy from Advantest – too $$$$ </li></ul><ul><li>We assume SQ in Jan. Wafers from DD in Aug. Need more info </li></ul><ul><li>No additional requirements for Wafer test </li></ul><ul><li>Assume no BE volume production. No assembly in IFR. </li></ul><ul><li>Can utilize RTP system </li></ul><ul><li>Capability that supports SQ and yield learning. </li></ul><ul><li>Need Speed characterization ability </li></ul><ul><li>Need Functional Characterization ability. </li></ul><ul><li>No TSOP option No Bump process </li></ul><ul><li>Background and Rationale </li></ul><ul><li>Next generation product </li></ul><ul><li>Staff request </li></ul><ul><li>RFC06 </li></ul><ul><li>New Minimum Speed requirement </li></ul>Project Objective   Deliver a DDR2 characterization (bitmapping, analysis of fct, parametric & speed) capability for wafers, modules and components by 1 st Silicon out. <ul><li>Exclusions: </li></ul><ul><li>volume capability in IFR </li></ul><ul><li>Constraints </li></ul><ul><li>Schedule </li></ul><ul><li>$$$$ </li></ul><ul><li>Possibly RTP support </li></ul><ul><li>MOSAID Legal situation </li></ul><ul><li>Speed requirement </li></ul><ul><li>Fail Memory requirements – 512M </li></ul>
    31. 36. Building a Gantt Chart
    32. 37. <ul><li>Gantt Chart Basics </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Why do we use it? </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>In a most basic sense, it is a simple way to view all the tasks of the project in a quick, easy order. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>After we get a better understanding of the construction of a Gantt chart, we will see some more advanced uses… </li></ul></ul>
    33. 38. <ul><li>Gantt Chart Basics </li></ul><ul><ul><li>What is a Gantt chart? </li></ul></ul>
    34. 39. <ul><li>Gantt Chart Basics - Terms </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Phases – Clearly defined major elements of the project on a summary level. Typically named after the deliverable requirement; ex: design, test, startup, turnover, etc. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Phases naturally lend themselves to definition of the Milestones (the Milestone would be defined as the completion of a phase) </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Phase definition examples; </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Defense : Concept & Technical Development, System Development & Demonstration, Production & Deployment, Support </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Construction : Feasibility, Planning & Design, Construction, Turnover & Startup </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Software : Proof of Concept, 1 st Build Cycle, 2 nd Build Cycle, Final Cycle </li></ul></ul></ul>
    35. 40. Project Phases For projects without predetermined phases, the phases or milestones can be defined through the following: <ul><li>Initiate : Authorization and formal introduction of the project or phase. </li></ul><ul><li>Plan : Define and refine objectives while selecting the best course of actions to attain project/phase objectives. </li></ul><ul><li>Execute : Coordinate resources to carry out the plan. </li></ul><ul><li>Control : Ensure project objectives by monitoring and measuring progress on a regular basis. Identify variances and initiate corrective actions. </li></ul><ul><li>Close : Formal acceptance of the project/phase end. </li></ul>The IPECC process frequently occurs within phases. IPECC
    36. 41. <ul><li>Gantt Chart Basics - Phases </li></ul><ul><ul><li>In the example of FIDO’s Castle, we have the following PHASES: </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Phase 1 – Initiate </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Phase 2 – Plan </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Phase 3 – Execute </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Phase 4 – Control </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Phase 5 – Close </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>I.P.E.C.C. </li></ul></ul>
    37. 42. <ul><li>Gantt Chart Basics - Phases </li></ul><ul><ul><li>And the following Milestone definitions for each Phase: </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Phase 1 – Initiate </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Milestone 1 – Project Start </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Phase 2 – Plan </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Milestone 2 – Final Approval </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Phase 3 – Execute </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Milestone 3 – Start Build </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Phase 4 – Control </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Milestone 4 – Finish Build </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Phase 5 – Close </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Milestone 5 – Move In </li></ul></ul></ul>
    38. 43. <ul><li>Gantt Chart Basics - Phases </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Within each Phase, there are a number of TASKS that must be accomplished to complete that Phase. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>A TASK is defined as a detailed description of the activity that takes place </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>HINT: label your TASKS with a verb to show the action that is supposed to take place! </li></ul></ul>
    39. 44. <ul><li>Gantt Chart Basics - Phases </li></ul><ul><ul><li>In FIDO’s Castle, these are some of the TASKS that take place: </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Check with Homeowner association for approval </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Measure Dog </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Borrow Pickup Truck </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Paint Structure </li></ul></ul></ul>
    40. 45. <ul><ul><li>How long will the TASK take to complete? </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>This is referred to as the “duration” </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Who is the person who will complete the TASK? </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>This is referred to as the “resource” </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><li>Gantt Chart Basics - Phases </li></ul><ul><ul><li>For each TASK, you should identify two basic things: </li></ul></ul>
    41. 46. <ul><li>Gantt Chart Basics - Phases </li></ul><ul><ul><li>We now have the basic structure of a Gantt chart: </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Phase 1 </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Milestone 1 </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Task 1.1 Duration 1.1 Resource 1.1 </li></ul></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Task 1.2 Duration 1.2 Resource 1.2 </li></ul></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Task 1.3 Duration 1.3 Resource 1.3 </li></ul></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Phase 2 </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Milestone 2 </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Task 2.1 Duration 2.1 Resource 2.1 </li></ul></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Task 2.2 Duration 2.2 Resource 2.2 </li></ul></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Task 2.3 Duration 2.3 Resource 2.3 </li></ul></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Etc… </li></ul></ul>
    42. 47. <ul><li>Gantt Chart Basics - Phases </li></ul><ul><ul><li>But, since we need to complete the TASKS before the Milestone is reached, we should rearrange our structure: </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Phase 1 </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Task 1.1 Duration 1.1 Resource 1.1 </li></ul></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Task 1.2 Duration 1.2 Resource 1.2 </li></ul></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Task 1.3 Duration 1.3 Resource 1.3 </li></ul></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Milestone 1 </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Phase 2 </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Task 2.1 Duration 2.1 Resource 2.1 </li></ul></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Task 2.2 Duration 2.2 Resource 2.2 </li></ul></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Task 2.3 Duration 2.3 Resource 2.3 </li></ul></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Milestone 2 </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Etc… </li></ul></ul>
    43. 48. <ul><li>Work Breakdown Structure (or WBS) </li></ul><ul><ul><li>The structure we have just created is also referred to as the Work Breakdown Structure (or WBS). </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>The WBS is defined as: </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>“ A deliverable-oriented grouping of project elements which organizes and defines the total scope of the project. Each descending level represents an increasingly detailed definition of a project component.”* </li></ul></ul></ul>* Source: Project Management Body of Knowledge
    44. 49. <ul><li>Work Breakdown Structure (or WBS) </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Creation of a WBS for your project involves the following steps: </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Identify the major elements of the project on a summary level. (PHASES) </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Identify the end result of each summary level task. (MILESTONES) </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Create the details for each summary level. (TASKS) </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>NOTE: A WBS should be created from the “top down” instead of “bottom up”. Starting from the bottom (with the details) can bog you down and you may lose sight of the overall project scope. </li></ul></ul>
    45. 50. <ul><li>Work Breakdown Structure (or WBS) </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Let’s create a WBS for one phase of FIDO’s castle: </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Initiate </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>1.1 Convince Wife </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>1.2 Ask Dog </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>1.3 Ask Kids </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>1.4 Check with Neighbors </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>1.5 Check with Homeowners Association </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>1.6 Verify Checking Account funds and budget </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>1.7 MILESTONE: Project Start </li></ul></ul></ul>
    46. 51. <ul><li>Work Breakdown Structure (or WBS) </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Each sub-task can usually be broken down into other tasks. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Initiate </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>1.1 Convince Wife </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>1.1.1 Take wife to dinner </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>1.1.1.1 Get car washed </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>1.1.1.2 Make sure car has enough gas </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>1.1.1.3 Choose restaurant </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>1.1.1.4 Drive to restaurant </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>1.1.2 Discuss FIDO’s history of devotion </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>1.1.3 Describe intention to build FIDO a castle </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>1.1.4 MILESTONE: Permission Granted! </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>1.2 Ask Dog </li></ul></ul></ul>
    47. 52. <ul><li>Work Breakdown Structure (or WBS) </li></ul><ul><ul><li>NOTE: Don’t get carried away with too much detail in your sub-task creation! It is easy to see in this example that almost any task can be broken down into minute detail… </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>If too much detail is included in the sub-task creation, your project will quickly become un-manageable! </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>HINT: Only break down your sub-tasks to a reasonable level. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>“ Reasonable ” can be defined as the level of detail necessary to make sure the item can be completed and that will allow the next task to take place. </li></ul></ul></ul>
    48. 53. <ul><li>Preparing to Build The Project Plan </li></ul><ul><ul><li>With the WBS identified and built, you are now almost ready to build the Project Plan. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>The Project Plan will tie in all the PHASES , MILESTONES and TASKS into the overall plan. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>First, we need to add some more details to each of the TASKS </li></ul></ul>
    49. 54. <ul><li>Preparing to Build The Project Plan </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Recall that for each TASK , we have identified the action to take place, the duration of the action and the resource who will accomplish it. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>For each TASK , we now need to identify any dependencies that exist with other TASKS … </li></ul></ul>
    50. 55. <ul><li>Preparing to Build The Project Plan – Task Dependencies </li></ul><ul><ul><li>There are 4 types of dependencies that exist in a project </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Finish-to-Start (FS) </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Start-to-Start (SS) </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Start-to-Finish (SF) </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Finish-to-Finish (FF) </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Let’s look at these in more detail… </li></ul></ul>
    51. 56. <ul><li>Preparing to Build The Project Plan – Task Dependencies </li></ul>You can also add lag or lead times to dependencies: SS+5d (Task B starts 5 days after Task A starts) FF+10d (Task B finishes 10 days after Task A)
    52. 57. <ul><li>Preparing to Build The Project Plan – Task Dependencies </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Now, we need to take our WBS that we created and evaluate each TASK for any dependencies . We also need to define which type of dependency it is. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>For example: </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>1.1.1.3 Choose restaurant </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>1.1.1.4 Drive to restaurant </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Should be linked as FS (Finish-to-Start). I need to finish task 1.1.1.3 before I start task 1.1.1.4. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>(Otherwise, the duration of task 1.1.1.4 could increase greatly!) </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Repeat this analysis for all TASKS in the WBS… </li></ul></ul>
    53. 58. <ul><li>Preparing to Build The Project Plan – Task Dependencies </li></ul><ul><ul><li>This is then depicted in Microsoft Project as the Project Plan: </li></ul></ul>
    54. 59. <ul><li>Preparing to Build The Project Plan – Task Dependencies </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Before entering all the information into Microsoft Project, however, we first need to capture our WBS with all TASK details on paper (or Excel spreadsheet or whatever). </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>This makes it easier to transfer the data into Microsoft Project. </li></ul></ul>
    55. 60. <ul><li>Preparing to Build The Project Plan – Build the WBS </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Build WBS For Students’ Projects At This Time… </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>NOTE: Line up all tasks in the same column in Excel. Use the following abbreviations for time duration: </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Hours = h </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Days = d </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Weeks = w </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>FIDO’s Castle example WBS on next page  </li></ul></ul>
    56. 61. Link to WBS spreadsheet
    57. 62. <ul><li>Microsoft Project Basics </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Transfer WBS outline from paper (or Excel…) into Microsoft Project. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Copy/Paste works well for this! </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Note: </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>If asked, set calendar to 24 hour instead of “standard” </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Don’t worry about actual dates … just durations </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>After all tasks are entered, link up dependent tasks and make sure a resource is assigned for each task </li></ul></ul></ul>
    58. 63. Link to FIDO’s PROJECT
    59. 64. Link to FIDO’s PROJECT <ul><li>Microsoft Project Basics </li></ul><ul><li>Terms to Define: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Calendar Base </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Task Types </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Multiple Resources and Their Effects </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Critical Path </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Baseline </li></ul></ul>
    60. 65. Link to FIDO’s PROJECT <ul><li>Microsoft Project Basics </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Calendar Base ( P roject/Project Information… for overall project calendar) </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Sets working days and hours </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Can be varied by task (double-click task; click “advanced” tab) </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Warning! This can change the time (duration) of your task… use cautiously! </li></ul></ul></ul>
    61. 66. Link to FIDO’s PROJECT <ul><li>Microsoft Project Basics </li></ul><ul><li>Task Types </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Fixed Units </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Fixed Work </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Fixed Duration </li></ul></ul>
    62. 67. Link to FIDO’s PROJECT <ul><li>Fixed Units (Default) {Units = Work ÷ Duration} </li></ul><ul><ul><li>A task in which the assigned units (or resources) is a fixed value and any changes to the amount of work or the task’s duration doesn’t impact the task’s units. </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Fixed Work {Work = Duration × Units} </li></ul><ul><ul><li>A task in which the amount of work is a fixed value and any changes to the task’s duration or the number of assigned units (or resources) don’t impact the task’s work. </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Fixed Duration {Duration = Work ÷ Units} </li></ul><ul><ul><li>A task in which the duration is a fixed value and any changes to the work or the assigned units (that is, resources) don’t impact the task’s duration. </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Microsoft Project Basics </li></ul>
    63. 68. Link to FIDO’s PROJECT <ul><li>Microsoft Project Basics </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Multiple Resources and Their Effects </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Depending on task type, additional resources may or may not reduce the duration of the task </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>ie – Putting more resources on a fixed-duration task will not complete the task any sooner. However, adding a 2 nd resource to a fixed effort task will reduce the time it takes to complete it. </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Resources can have independent calendars </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Bob works all the time, but Bob-Build can only work in the evenings and on Saturdays. </li></ul></ul></ul>
    64. 69. Link to FIDO’s PROJECT <ul><li>Microsoft Project Basics </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Critical Path </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>The series of tasks that determine the finish date of the project. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>When the last task in the critical path is completed, the project is completed. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>The Critical Path should be monitored more closely than other tasks because any slip in any task in the critical path directly reflects on the project completion date. </li></ul></ul>
    65. 70. Link to FIDO’s PROJECT <ul><li>Microsoft Project Basics </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Baseline </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>The baseline of the project is a set of key, original project estimates. It consists of the original task, resource, assignment and cost estimates that were entered for the project. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Don’t create a baseline until you’ve fine-tuned the project and are satisfied with your starting point. </li></ul></ul>
    66. 71. Link to FIDO’s PROJECT <ul><li>Microsoft Project Basics </li></ul><ul><ul><li>We now have a Project Plan in Microsoft Project, so what is the value of it? </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Shorten, Control, Monitor </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Shorten: find the critical path (the tasks that drive the time length of the project) and decide if you can reduce them. If so, the project can be done quicker. </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Control: once the project begins, use the Plan (the Gantt chart) to control the direction of the project and to set priorities. </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Monitor: during the execution of the Plan, monitor the progress and adjust resources if necessary </li></ul></ul></ul>
    67. 72. MTA BASICS
    68. 73. MTA <ul><li>The Milestone Trend Analysis (MTA) is part of project reporting , used to track and monitor the selected project. </li></ul><ul><li>The MTA is used to track a single project Not a series of projects (Program or Campaign). Lines should not cross.  </li></ul><ul><li>An on-time project will be reflected in straight-line tracking of the Milestones. A delayed project will show the Milestones drifting upward in the graph. </li></ul><ul><li>The MTA should be updated on a regular basis, typically once per week . </li></ul><ul><li>The number of Milestones or Phases tracked should be between 5 and 9. </li></ul>
    69. 74. <ul><li>Project Example </li></ul><ul><li>Title: Building a Dog House “FIDO’s Castle” </li></ul><ul><li>Phases - Tasks </li></ul><ul><li>Initiate – Convince Wife, Ask Dog, Ask Kids, Check neighbors, Check Homeowner association, Verify checking account funds/Budget, Project Start </li></ul><ul><li>Plan – Build or Buy, Measure Dog, Will adults sleep in it? Evaluate and Decide Features, Get Estimates, Hire Architect or Draw own plans. Check tools needed (including shipping) vs on-hand vs requirements, Check calender – schedule, Get final approval </li></ul><ul><li>Execute – Borrow Pickup truck, Get tools, Check for sales, Shop for materials, Start Build . (foundation, frame, roof, interior) </li></ul><ul><li>Control – Check budget, Monitor supplies (restock), Get family/neighborhood feedback, Bring dog by, Paint or Finish. Finish Build </li></ul><ul><li>Close - Install furniture. Weather proof test, pay final bills. Move in . </li></ul>
    70. 75. MTA for FIDO
    71. 77. D11 Project MTA
    72. 78. MTA Maker Training
    73. 79. Click Here to open MTA application
    74. 80. Introduction This is the screen that you will see when you first open the file. There are several major sections to review. Milestone Information Action Buttons Comment Entry
    75. 81. Some Milestone Basics There are some milestone and MTA basics that we should review before getting started. A milestone trend analysis (MTA) is a graphical way of tracking the progress of the major milestones of a project. As such, two dates are important. Note that it would be difficult to have a completion date that is earlier than the reporting date. Similarly, it would be difficult to have a reporting date that is far in the future! Reporting Date Planned Completion Date
    76. 82. Milestone Entry Direct There are several ways to enter milestone information in MTA Maker. The first and most direct is to type the reporting dates and planned milestone completion dates directly into the spreadsheet. The others all involve the milestone entry dialog box. Click on this button to bring up the box.
    77. 83. Milestone Entry Dialog Box You can also click on the little arrow to pull down a list of the previously entered reporting dates. Note that the most recent date is automatically set to one week after the last saved reporting date. Note that the three main components of MTA data appear here – reporting date, milestone and completion date. They can all be typed in directly from here. You can pull down a list of the existing milestones as well. Note that there are two special “milestones” in the list: Update All No Changes and Import From MS Project File
    78. 84. Completing Milestone Dialog Box Entry When you are set, click the Enter Update button to transfer the information from the dialog box to the spreadsheet. When you are finished entering milestone information, click the Done button to close the dialog box.
    79. 85. Milestone Entry Dialog Box – Update All Select Update All No Changes to update all the milestones with the most recent completion date with no changes. Remember to click on Enter Update to actually update the milestones.
    80. 86. Milestone Entry Dialog Box – MS Project Select Import From MS Project File and click on Enter Update to open another dialog box that allows you to select a MS Project File. Note that MTA Maker expects the milestone names to not change, nor for any to be deleted. Additional milestones are OK. Note also that a milestone is defined as a project task with zero duration. It is recommended that you add a zero duration task (milestone) to the end of every major project phase. See the project management training for more details. Double click the file name, or click once and click on Open. The milestones will be extracted automatically.
    81. 87. Action Buttons OK, now it’s time to create the chart. As the buttons say, click “Create” to create a new chart from scratch. Click “Update” to just update the milestone data without affecting any of your comments.
    82. 88. Enter Comments This is what the chart will look like right after you click “create MTA”. Now is a good time to enter comments, highlights, project information etc. Do this by selecting the MTA_Chart tab. Once the tab is selected, you can click on one of these white boxes and enter your comments. You will need to click the “Update MTA Chart” button to have the updates get reflected in the small MTA on the Milestones tab.
    83. 89. Mini MTA for Publication It’s recommended that you copy and paste this MTA into other programs like Powerpoint. You can change the size in any way. All the elements will scale properly, so you won’t need to do any post-paste tweaking!
    84. 90. Questions and Comments <ul><li>Questions regarding the MTA Maker macro should be directed to IFPT IT department. </li></ul><ul><li>Release version link: MTA Maker </li></ul><ul><ul><li>PLEASE NOTE !!!! After opening the file from this link, please save it to an appropriate place (desktop, C drive, H drive, network drive etc.). It will not work directly from the link, since it is read only. </li></ul></ul>
    85. 91. BUILD YOUR OWN MTA
    86. 92. SUMMARY
    87. 93. Minimum Requirements for an IFR Project - SUMMARY 1. Charter FORM 2. Team List w/Roles & Responsibilities 3. Gantt Chart – Microsoft Project 4. MTA (Phases of Project) 5. Regular Report – (Or Embedded in MTA)
    88. 94. KEY ELEMENTS OF A CHARTER <ul><li>Assumptions </li></ul><ul><li>Background </li></ul><ul><li>Objective (S.M.A.R.T.) </li></ul><ul><li>Constraints/Exclusions </li></ul>SCOPE
    89. 95. <ul><li>KEY POINTS TO MTA </li></ul><ul><li>MTA is a Reporting Tool </li></ul><ul><li>Use I.P.E.C.C. for Project Phases </li></ul><ul><li>A Milestone is a deliverable at the completion of a Phase. </li></ul>
    90. 96. <ul><li>Resources </li></ul><ul><ul><li>MP Project Management Manual: </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>http:// goto.infineon.com /MP-PJM </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>PMI Website (Project Management Institute) http:// www.pmi.org/info/default.asp </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>PMBOK – available on web site (if member) </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Classroom foils – will be provided after class </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Specific questions regarding class notes can be directed to Bob Trahan or Kevin Snead at IFR: </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>[email_address] </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>[email_address] </li></ul></ul></ul>
    91. 97. Headline, one or two lines Arial bold, 28 pt, line spacing 32 pt, purple <ul><li>Copy Arial, 20 pt, line spacing 26 pt, for paragraphs additional 7 pt. Nonummy nibh euiser in lorem dolor sit: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Enim ad minim veniam, quis norud exerci tation onsec adipiscing elit, sed minim ve am, quis nostrud exercitation cor minim amet venia dolor in hendren vulputate autem. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Sus cipit lobortis nisl ut aliquip ex eatore commodo conse quat duis autem vel eum iriure dolor: </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>In hendren vulputate velit sit molestie consequat </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Vel illum dolore eufor feugiat nul facilisis </li></ul></ul></ul>
    92. 98. Use of color in information graphics Headline Arial bold, 20 pt, line spacing 26 pt
    93. 99. Colors Purple R 82 / G 12 / B 130 Blue R 169 / G 213 / B 229 All colors to be used are already preset in the PowerPoint color palette. Primary color Secondary colors Green R 208 / G 216 / B 0 Orange R 255 / G 180 / B 1 Light Blue R 225 / G 241 / B 249 Dark Blue R 39 / G 14 / B 74 Red R 195 / G 1 / B 29
    94. 100. Thank you The World’s Leading Creative Memory Company

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