Implementing
Technologies
at Schools

Tracey Benettolo
A Quick Story …
What is Change Management?
Gavin Wedell. What is Change Management?
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=__IlYNMdV9E
10 Reasons Why People Resist

http://blogs.hbr.org/kanter/2012/09/ten-reasons-people-resist-chang.html
Loss of Control
Excess uncertainty
Surprise Surprise!!!
Everything Seems Different
Loss of Face
Concerns
about
Competence
More Work
Ripple Effects
Past Resentments
Sometimes the Threat is Real
How?
ROE
CHANGE
METHODOLOGY

AUP

Change
Adoption
Model

PROJECT
APPROACH
METHODOLOGY

CHANGE
VISION

PEOPLE
Background Reading
Lewin & Rosenberg
1. Unfreeze •

•

Awareness

Create a case for/ motivation to change:
– Articulate a compelling vision
–...
Kotter
1. Create a sense of urgency
2. Build a guiding coalition
3. Get the vision right
4. Communicate buy-in
5. Empower ...
Kotter/ Lewin /Rosenberg
(3-stage change/ learner adoption methodology)
Stage 1

Stage 2

Stage 3

Unfreezing

Changing/Tr...
Tracey Benettolo
Sources
Gavin Wedell. What is Change Management?
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=__IlYNMdV9E
Rosabeth Moss Kanter. Ten Reas...
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Utilising a Change Management Model to Implement Technologies

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  • Change interferes with autonomy and can make people feel that they've lost control over their territory. It's not just political, as in who has the power. Our sense of self-determination is often the first things to go when faced with a potential change coming from someone else. Smart leaders leave room for those affected by change to make choices. They invite others into the planning, giving them ownership.
  • Excess uncertainty: If change feels like walking off a cliff blindfolded, then people will reject it. People will often prefer to remain mired in misery than to head toward an unknown. As the saying goes, "Better the devil you know than the devil you don't know." To overcome inertia requires a sense of safety as well as an inspiring vision. Leaders should create certainty of process, with clear, simple steps and timetables.
  • Surprise, surprise! Decisions imposed on people suddenly, with no time to get used to the idea or prepare for the consequences, are generally resisted. It's always easier to say No than to say Yes. Leaders should avoid the temptation to craft changes in secret and then announce them all at once. It's better to plant seeds — that is, to sprinkle hints of what might be coming and seek input.
  • Everything seems different. Change is meant to bring something different, but how different? We are creatures of habit. Routines become automatic, but change jolts us into consciousness, sometimes in uncomfortable ways. Too many differences can be distracting or confusing. Leaders should try to minimize the number of unrelated differences introduced by a central change. Wherever possible keep things familiar. Remain focused on the important things; avoid change for the sake of change.
  • Loss of face. By definition, change is a departure from the past. Those people associated with the last version — the one that didn't work, or the one that's being superseded — are likely to be defensive about it. When change involves a big shift of strategic direction, the people responsible for the previous direction dread the perception that they must have been wrong. Leaders can help people maintain dignity by celebrating those elements of the past that are worth honoring, and making it clear that the world has changed. That makes it easier to let go and move on.
  • Concerns about competence. Can I do it? Change is resisted when it makes people feel stupid. They might express skepticism about whether the new software version will work or whether digital journalism is really an improvement, but down deep they are worried that their skills will be obsolete. Leaders should over-invest in structural reassurance, providing abundant information, education, training, mentors, and support systems. A period of overlap, running two systems simultaneously, helps ease transitions.
  • More work. Here is a universal challenge. Change is indeed more work. Those closest to the change in terms of designing and testing it are often overloaded, in part because of the inevitable unanticipated glitches in the middle of change, per "Kanter's Law" that "everything can look like a failure in the middle." Leaders should acknowledge the hard work of change by allowing some people to focus exclusively on it, or adding extra perqs for participants (meals? valet parking? massages?). They should reward and recognize participants — and their families, too, who often make unseen sacrifices.
  • Ripple effects. Like tossing a pebble into a pond, change creates ripples, reaching distant spots in ever-widening circles. The ripples disrupt other departments, important customers, people well outside the venture or neighborhood, and they start to push back, rebelling against changes they had nothing to do with that interfere with their own activities. Leaders should enlarge the circle of stakeholders. They must consider all affected parties, however distant, and work with them to minimize disruption.
  • Past resentments. The ghosts of the past are always lying in wait to haunt us. As long as everything is steady state, they remain out of sight. But the minute you need cooperation for something new or different, the ghosts spring into action. Old wounds reopen, historic resentments are remembered — sometimes going back many generations. Leaders should consider gestures to heal the past before sailing into the future.
  • Sometimes the threat is real. Now we get to true pain and politics. Change is resisted because it can hurt. When new technologies displace old ones, jobs can be lost; prices can be cut; investments can be wiped out. The best thing leaders can do when the changes they seek pose significant threat is to be honest, transparent, fast, and fair. For example, one big layoff with strong transition assistance is better than successive waves of cuts.
  • Technology implementations require communication and behavioural change to:Create broader awareness;Get Stakeholder buy-in (overcome resistance);Teacher education and Capacity building;To achieve maximum utilisation of the technology and content assets that in turn secures renewal and sustainability.
  • Kurt Lewinrecognisedas the father of social psychology. He was one of the first researchers to study group dynamics and organization development and was influential in the study of group dynamics and experiential learning.Lewin may be best known for his three-step change model, which he developed in 1947 and which maintained its fundamental integrity through several iterations for nearly 50 years. The three steps in the model are unfreezing, changing, and refreezing. Unfreezing refers to the work that is required to move people out of their safe and comfortable status quo. To do this requires an understanding of forces that drive change as well as those that stand in the way of change. Lewin's force-field analysis identifies and measures the strengths of these forces. Driving forces are listed and given a value from one to four, and restraining forces are listed and given a value of negative one to negative four. This analysis helps the decision maker to assess the forces acting on a proposed change.Changing is the process of doing all that is required to effect change. An important idea that Lewin put forth in this context is that change takes time and may involve several iterations of moving forward and sliding back before it begins to stick. Finally, refreezing involves institutionalizing the change and getting comfortable with the new status quo.Lewin was also famous for his field theory, which emphasized how individuals' relationship with their environment affected their work. Lewin found that human behavior (b) was a result of an individual's activity (p) and the environment (e) in which the person works or b = (p, e). This was one of the first attempts at creating what is now known as a human performance equation.
  • Utilising a Change Management Model to Implement Technologies

    1. 1. Implementing Technologies at Schools Tracey Benettolo
    2. 2. A Quick Story …
    3. 3. What is Change Management?
    4. 4. Gavin Wedell. What is Change Management? http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=__IlYNMdV9E
    5. 5. 10 Reasons Why People Resist http://blogs.hbr.org/kanter/2012/09/ten-reasons-people-resist-chang.html
    6. 6. Loss of Control
    7. 7. Excess uncertainty
    8. 8. Surprise Surprise!!!
    9. 9. Everything Seems Different
    10. 10. Loss of Face
    11. 11. Concerns about Competence
    12. 12. More Work
    13. 13. Ripple Effects
    14. 14. Past Resentments
    15. 15. Sometimes the Threat is Real
    16. 16. How?
    17. 17. ROE CHANGE METHODOLOGY AUP Change Adoption Model PROJECT APPROACH METHODOLOGY CHANGE VISION PEOPLE
    18. 18. Background Reading
    19. 19. Lewin & Rosenberg 1. Unfreeze • • Awareness Create a case for/ motivation to change: – Articulate a compelling vision – Persuade yourself and others Benchmarking to high performance organisations 2. Changing/Transition - Understanding – Change begins to happen – Old ways are challenged 3. Freeze - Preference – Remove old methods and document the new – Embed new way – Align reward systems
    20. 20. Kotter 1. Create a sense of urgency 2. Build a guiding coalition 3. Get the vision right 4. Communicate buy-in 5. Empower action 6. Create short-term wins 7. Don’t let up 8. Make it stick Creating a climate for change Engaging and enabling the whole institution Implementing and sustaining change
    21. 21. Kotter/ Lewin /Rosenberg (3-stage change/ learner adoption methodology) Stage 1 Stage 2 Stage 3 Unfreezing Changing/Transiton Freezing Awareness Understanding Preference Phase 1: Pre- Go live Phase 2: Go live Communications and Change Adoption Phase 3: Post-Go live
    22. 22. Tracey Benettolo
    23. 23. Sources Gavin Wedell. What is Change Management? http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=__IlYNMdV9E Rosabeth Moss Kanter. Ten Reasons People Resist Change http://blogs.hbr.org/kanter/2012/09/ten-reasons-people-resist-chang.html Marc J Rosenberg. Beyond E-Learning: Approaches and Technologies to Enhance Organizational Knowledge, Learning and Performance http://www.amazon.com/Beyond-E-Learning-Technologies-OrganizationalPerformance/dp/0787977578/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1351147546&sr=8-1&keywords=marc+rosenberg John P. Kotter. Leading Change http://www.amazon.com/Leading-Change-New-PrefaceAuthor/dp/1422186431/ref=sr_1_1?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1351147724&sr=11&keywords=kotter+leading+change#reader_1422186431 John P. Kotter. The Heart of Change http://www.amazon.com/Heart-Change-Real-Life-StoriesOrganizations/dp/1578512549/ref=sr_1_4?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1351147873&sr=14&keywords=kotter+leading+the+heart+of+change#reader_1578512549 Kurt Lewin http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kurt_Lewin

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