Political parties

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Brief overview of the U.S. political parties.

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Political parties

  1. 1. CIVICS & ECONOMICS UNIT 4
  2. 2. American’s are divided by theirPolitical Ideology - basic political beliefs. “Liberal” “Conservative” Democrats Republicans Political Spectrum
  3. 3. Political Parties - a group of citizens with similar views on public issues who work to put their ideas into effective government action. WHAT DO PARTIES DO? *Recruit candidates & support campaigns *Help organize elections and inform voters *Organize the government*Unite diverse interests and make collective action possible
  4. 4. WHO ARE THE REPUBLICANS?Known as ConservativesMore likely to be white, male, and relatively affluentFavor limiting the size of the nt’l gov. - more power to the statesBroad-based tax cutsOppose excessive business regulation by the governmentTend to favor prayer in public schools, while opposing abortion andgun control lawsTend to oppose minimum wage laws as unnecessary economicregulation
  5. 5. WHO ARE THE DEMOCRATS? *Known as Liberals *More likely to be a member of a minority group, female, and less affluent *Strong federal government to solve a variety of problems *Tax cuts for the poor, higher taxes for the affluent to support social programs*Gov. regulation of business to protect consumers, workers, or the environment*Democrats are more likely to support abortion rights and gun control laws, while opposing school prayer *Favor regular increases in minimum wage to support poor families
  6. 6. THIRD PARTIES EXAMPLES FROM TYPE OF PARTY U.S. HISTORY National Woman’s Party (1913-1920) Single-issue party Promoted voting rights for women Formed to oppose or promote Right to Life Party (1970-present) 1 issue Opposes legalized abortion Economic protest party Greenback Party (1874-1884) Formed to promote “better times” Promoted use of paper $, silver coinage, and the 8 hour workday Ideological party Libertarian Party (1971-Present) Formed by people committed to a set of Favors reducing the role of gvn’t in citizens’ beliefs lives Progressive “Bull Moose” Party (1912-1952) Splinter party Separated from the Republicans to promote Formed by people unhappy with a major progressive reforms partyThird parties have limited success in the two-party system in theU.S. Smaller parties find it hard to raise $$$ and get the mediacoverage needed to challenge the 2 major parties.
  7. 7. IN THEMIDDLE
  8. 8. How do we form our Political Opinions? Family - 95% of high school seniors id the same party as their parents. School - the more educated Americans are, the more Political likely they are to participate in politics.Socialization the process by Religion - Religious teaching help shape political values. which you acquireyour political beliefs Peer Groups - Our friends, co-workers and the groups & attitudes we join influence our political views. Gender & Ethnicity - effect our political loyalties. News Media - shapes opinion by the information given to us about our world
  9. 9. SPECIAL-INTEREST GROUPSwhen a group seeks to influence governmentat any levelthe term special interest refers to a particulargoal or set of goals that unite the members ofa groupwhy join an interest group? offer information and benefits agree with the group’s goals and want to join others that feel the same
  10. 10. SPECIAL-INTEREST GROUPS
  11. 11. SPECIAL-INTEREST GROUPS *One way that interest groups try to influencegovernment is by contributing $$$ to political parties and candidates during elections. *Political Action Committees (PACs) $$- privatefunding groups sponsored by corporations, unions, or other interest groups *Do interest groups buy elected officials??

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