A discussion of Leadership and Follow-ship
• Mission
• Vision
• Strategic plan
— Chinese proverb

    If you want one year of prosperity, grow

    grain.
    If you want 10 years of prosperity, grow
...
On average, leaders contribute no more than 20 percent to

    the success of most organizations

    Followers are criti...
What is a leader?

    How do leaders differ from managers?


    What is a follower?


    Can we have a meaningful di...
It is the job of the leader to grow the

    followers

    The mark of a great leader is the development and growth of
 ...
The manager administers; the leader innovates

  The manager is a copy; the leader is the original

  The manger focuses...
-becoming a Leader



   Becoming a manager has much to do with learning the metaphors;
  becoming a good manager has much...
The Leader is always on Stage

A leader must remember that he is on stage every day. His people
  are watching him. Everyt...
Honesty

    Forward-looking

    Inspiring

    Competent

    Fair-minded

Intelligence

  Enthusiasm

 Strong communication skills
 Initiative
 Energy
 Political astuteness
 And the two qua...
Have no sense of vision:

     “She constantly changes her mind about important
      issues. There is no consistent vis...
Embrace exceptional followers as partners

    and co-creators
     Partnership means sharing information
     Partners...
Pragmatic followers

    Alienated followers

    Comformist

    Passive followers

    Exceptional followers


    ...
Positive:

     Keeps things in perspective
     Plays by the rules and regulations
    Negative:

     Plays politic...
Positive:

     Mavericks who think for themselves
     Plays the devil’s advocate
    Negative:

     Troublesome, c...
Positive:

     Accepts assignments easily
     Trusts and commits to the team and the leader
     Seeks to minimize c...
Positive:

     Relies on the leader’s judgment and thinking
     Seldom resists
    Negative:

     Just putting in ...
Positive:

     Contributes above and beyond
     Seeks to add value and assist others
    Negative:

     Highly ide...
Job skills: How exceptional followers add value

     Focus and commitment
     Competence in critical-path activities
...
Ira Chaleff introduces the idea of the

    “courageous” follower:
     The courage to assume responsibility
     The c...
Leaders ache for followers who will show initiative

    Assume responsibility for yourself … and your

    organization...
They assume new or additional responsibilities to unburden

    the leader and serve the organization
  They stay alert f...
Courageous followers give voice to the

    discomfort they feel when the behaviors or
    policies of the leader or grou...
When behavior that jeopardizes the

    common purpose remains unchanged,
    courageous followers recognize the need
   ...
Focus on the goal, not the job

    Do a great job on critical-path activities related to the goal

    Contribute to th...
Support the leader’s decisions

 Challenge the leader
 Encourage the leader
 Defend the leader
Work to increase the variety and complexity of assignments they receive

    Seek to enhance their skill sets

    Share...
Rosabeth Moss Kanter cites four principles in which

    followers might become more powerful:
     Give people importan...
The reason that most change
      efforts derail is because
     they focus on processes
               and not people.
  ...
Leadership is really not how we perceive
 ourselves as leaders –
 But, how those who follow perceive us.

PEOPLE MAY NOT R...
0            1      2               3       4                5        6
                 Rarely                Occasionall...
0           1           2        3        4               5        6
     Rarely                       Occasionally       ...
Add the scores from the following
Add the scores from the following
                                    questions (active ...
Ira Chaleff, in The Courageous Follower, notes that the
      term follower “conjures up images of docility,
conformity, w...
Bennis: Organizing Genius

                                                          Kelly, Robert E. “In Praise of Follo...
In Search Of Leadership A Discussion Of Leadership And Follow Ship [Autosaved]
In Search Of Leadership A Discussion Of Leadership And Follow Ship [Autosaved]
In Search Of Leadership A Discussion Of Leadership And Follow Ship [Autosaved]
In Search Of Leadership A Discussion Of Leadership And Follow Ship [Autosaved]
In Search Of Leadership A Discussion Of Leadership And Follow Ship [Autosaved]
In Search Of Leadership A Discussion Of Leadership And Follow Ship [Autosaved]
In Search Of Leadership A Discussion Of Leadership And Follow Ship [Autosaved]
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A review of expectations on both Leaders and Followers

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In Search Of Leadership A Discussion Of Leadership And Follow Ship [Autosaved]

  1. 1. A discussion of Leadership and Follow-ship
  2. 2. • Mission • Vision • Strategic plan
  3. 3. — Chinese proverb If you want one year of prosperity, grow  grain. If you want 10 years of prosperity, grow  trees. If you want 100 years of prosperity, grow  people.
  4. 4. On average, leaders contribute no more than 20 percent to  the success of most organizations Followers are critical to the remaining 80 percent  The only time followers follow the leader is when the  leader’s orbit and the follower’s orbit are in synch Most people, whatever their title, spend more time working  as followers than as leaders (more time reporting to people than having people report to us)
  5. 5. What is a leader?  How do leaders differ from managers?  What is a follower?  Can we have a meaningful discussion of followership  without a discussion of leadership? Why is leadership so important in higher education?  What about followership?  Why do you think the idea, and ideal, of followership is  so difficult for us to deal with?
  6. 6. It is the job of the leader to grow the  followers The mark of a great leader is the development and growth of It is the job of the followers to grow the  followers. organization One mark of a great follower is the growth of leaders.
  7. 7. The manager administers; the leader innovates  The manager is a copy; the leader is the original  The manger focuses on systems and structure; the leader focuses on  people  The manager relies on control; the leader inspires trust  The manager has a short-range view; the leader has a long-range view  The manager asks how and when; the leader asks what and why  The manager has his eye always on the bottom line; the leader has his eye on the horizon  The manager imitates; the leader originates  The manager accepts the status quo; the leader challenges it  The manager is the classic good soldier; the leader is his own person  The manager does things right; the leader does the right things
  8. 8. -becoming a Leader Becoming a manager has much to do with learning the metaphors; becoming a good manager has much to do with using the metaphors; and becoming a leader has much to do with changing the metaphors.
  9. 9. The Leader is always on Stage A leader must remember that he is on stage every day. His people are watching him. Everything he says, and the way he says it, sends off clues to his employees. These clues affect performance. The leader is always on stage. – Marcus Buckingham: First, Break All the Rules
  10. 10. Honesty  Forward-looking  Inspiring  Competent  Fair-minded 
  11. 11. Intelligence  Enthusiasm   Strong communication skills  Initiative  Energy  Political astuteness  And the two qualities listed most often by leaders:  Cooperation  Loyalty Question: What “qualities” are missing? 
  12. 12. Have no sense of vision:   “She constantly changes her mind about important issues. There is no consistent vision. Everyone is going in circles and nothing important ever gets accomplished.” Refuse to listen:   “My president believes that he is always right. He simply will not listen. His body language, demeanor, and how he speaks to his staff constantly reinforce the impression that he knows more than anyone. After a while we just give up trying to contribute.”
  13. 13. Embrace exceptional followers as partners  and co-creators  Partnership means sharing information  Partners co-create the vision and mission  Partners share the risks and the rewards Create environments where exceptional  followers flourish Be less a hero and more a hero maker 
  14. 14. Pragmatic followers  Alienated followers  Comformist  Passive followers  Exceptional followers  See “quiz” at end of presentation 
  15. 15. Positive:   Keeps things in perspective  Plays by the rules and regulations Negative:   Plays political games  Risk averse and prone to cover their tracks  Carries out assignments with middling enthusiasm Believes that:   Staying within the rules is important  Should try to avoid uncertainty and instability
  16. 16. Positive:   Mavericks who think for themselves  Plays the devil’s advocate Negative:   Troublesome, cynical  Not a team player Believes that:   Their leader does not fully recognize or utilize their talents Extreme cases: Saboteur 
  17. 17. Positive:   Accepts assignments easily  Trusts and commits to the team and the leader  Seeks to minimize conflict Negative:   Lacks own ideas  Unwilling to make unpopular decisions  Averse to conflict Believes that:   Following the established order is more important than outcomes
  18. 18. Positive:   Relies on the leader’s judgment and thinking  Seldom resists Negative:   Just putting in their time, little else  Requires an inordinate amount of supervision Believes that:   The organization doesn’t want their ideas  The leader is going to do what he/she wants anyway
  19. 19. Positive:   Contributes above and beyond  Seeks to add value and assist others Negative:   Highly idealistic; can suffer disillusionment  Burnout Believes that:   Their contribution is important … even essential
  20. 20. Job skills: How exceptional followers add value   Focus and commitment  Competence in critical-path activities  Initiative in increasing their value to the organization Organizational skills: How exceptional followers nurture and  leverage a web of organizational relationships with:  Team members  Organizational networks  Leaders  Values: How exceptional followers exercise a courageous conscience which guides their job activities and organizational relationships
  21. 21. Ira Chaleff introduces the idea of the  “courageous” follower:  The courage to assume responsibility  The courage to serve  The courage to challenge  The courage to participate in organizational change  The courage to leave
  22. 22. Leaders ache for followers who will show initiative  Assume responsibility for yourself … and your  organization Discover or create opportunities to fulfill their  potential and maximize their value to the organization Focus on the critical path 
  23. 23. They assume new or additional responsibilities to unburden  the leader and serve the organization They stay alert for areas in which their strengths  complement the leader’s and assert themselves in these areas  Courageous followers stand up for their leader and the tough decisions a leader must make if the organization is to achieve its purpose  The responsibilities of gate keeping  Focus the leader
  24. 24. Courageous followers give voice to the  discomfort they feel when the behaviors or policies of the leader or group conflict with their sense of what is right They are willing to stand up, to stand out, to  risk rejection, to initiate conflict in order to examine the actions of the leader and group when appropriate
  25. 25. When behavior that jeopardizes the  common purpose remains unchanged, courageous followers recognize the need for organizational change They champion the need for change and  stay with the leader and the group while they mutually struggle with the difficulty of real change
  26. 26. Focus on the goal, not the job  Do a great job on critical-path activities related to the goal  Contribute to the growth of other team members  Help keep the team, and the leaders, on track  Take the initiative to increase their value to the organization  Realize they add value not just by going above and beyond  their work, but in being who they are—their experiences, ideals, and dreams
  27. 27. Support the leader’s decisions   Challenge the leader  Encourage the leader  Defend the leader
  28. 28. Work to increase the variety and complexity of assignments they receive  Seek to enhance their skill sets  Share the credit  Never undermine their authority  Mentor followers who hope to assume larger leadership roles  Encourage and enhance dialogue  Heighten their sense of accountability for the decisions they make  Keep their confidences  Empower them  Acknowledge their value, both publicly and privately  Reward them in ways they find meaningful  Trust your followers 
  29. 29. Rosabeth Moss Kanter cites four principles in which  followers might become more powerful:  Give people important work to do on critical issues  Give people discretion and autonomy over their tasks and resources  Give people visibility and provide recognition for their efforts  Build relationships for your people, connecting them with powerful people and finding them sponsors and mentors
  30. 30. The reason that most change efforts derail is because they focus on processes and not people. Systems won’t change if people won’t cooperate. People are the gatekeepers of change.
  31. 31. Leadership is really not how we perceive ourselves as leaders – But, how those who follow perceive us. PEOPLE MAY NOT REMEMBER EXACTLY WHAT YOU DID, OR WHAT YOU SAID, BUT, THEY WILL ALWAYS REMEMBER HOW YOU MADE THEM FEEL.
  32. 32. 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 Rarely Occasionally Almost Always Does your work help you fulfill some societal goal or personal dream that is important to you?  Are your personal work goals aligned with the organization's priority goals?  Are you highly committed to and energized by your work and organization, giving them your best  ideas and performance? Does your enthusiasm also spread to and energize your co-workers?  Instead of waiting for or merely accepting what the leader tells you, do you personally identify  which organizational activities are most critical for achieving the organization's priority goals? Do you actively develop a distinctive competence in those critical activities so that you become  more valuable to the leader and the organization? When starting a new job or assignment, do you promptly build a record of successes in tasks that  are important to the leader? Can the leader give you a difficult assignment without the benefit of much supervision, knowing  that you will meet your deadline with highest-quality work and that you will ”fill in the cracksquot; if need be? Do you take the initiative to seek out and successfully complete assignments that go above and  beyond your job? When you are not the leader of a group project, do you still contribute at a high level, often doing  more than your share?
  33. 33. 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 Rarely Occasionally Almost Always Do you independently think up and champion new ideas that will contribute significantly to the  leader's or the organization's goals? Do you try to solve the tough problems (technical or organizational), rather than look to the leader to  do it for you? Do you help out other co-workers, making them look good, even when you don't get any credit?  Do you help the leader or group see both the upside potential and downside risks of ideas or plans,  playing the devil's advocate if need be? Do you understand the leader's needs, goals, and constraints, and work hard to help meet them?  Do you actively and honestly own up to your strengths and weaknesses rather than put off evaluation?  Do you make a habit of internally questioning the wisdom of the leader's decision rather than just  doing what you are told? When the leader asks you to do something that runs contrary to your professional or personal  preferences, do you say quot;noquot; rather than ''yesquot;? Do you act on your own ethical standards rather than the leader's or the group's standards?  Do you assert your views on important issues, even though it might mean conflict with your group or  reprisals from the leader?
  34. 34. Add the scores from the following Add the scores from the following questions (active engagement): questions (independent thinking):  2. _____  1. _____  3. _____  5. _____  4. _____  11. _____  6. _____  12. _____  7. _____  14. _____  8. _____  16. _____  9. _____  17. _____  10. _____  18. _____  13. _____  19. _____  15. _____  20. _____ TOTAL: _____ TOTAL: _____
  35. 35. Ira Chaleff, in The Courageous Follower, notes that the term follower “conjures up images of docility, conformity, weakness, and failure to excel. Often, none of this is the least bit true. The sooner we move beyond these images and get comfortable with the idea of powerful followers supporting powerful leaders, the sooner we can fully develop and test models for dynamic, self-responsible, synergistic relationships in our organizations.”
  36. 36. Bennis: Organizing Genius  Kelly, Robert E. “In Praise of Followers,”  Buckingham: First, Break All the Rules  Harvard Business Review Carlyle: On Heroes, Hero-Worship and the  Heroic in History ———. The Power of Followership: How to  Chaleff, Ira. The Courageous Follower: Standing  Create Leaders People Want to Follow and Up To and For Our Leaders Followers Who Lead Themselves Greenleaf, Robert K. Servant Leadership: A  Kriegel, Robert. Sacred Cows Make the Best  Journey Into the Nature of Legitimate Power Burgers and Greatness Robbins: Why Teams Don’t Work  Habecker, Eugene B. Leading With a Follower’s  Heart Sevier, Robert A. “How to Be An Exemplary  Follower,” Trusteeship

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