A teacher’s job…  is always to bridge from the know to the new. There really   is no other choice.                Children...
Can Your Basal ReaderMeet the Common Core?Strategies and Activities to Enhance     Basal Reading Instruction              ...
Thought of the Day:If a doctor, a lawyer, or a dentist had forty  people in his office at one time, all of  whom had diffe...
Why are we here?• National Reading Panel Report, 1997/2000  – www.nationalreadingpanel.org  – Five essential components of...
Why are we here?                         (continued)• February, 2011: IDOE adopted a proposed rule to  implement the requi...
What does this mean to us?Each school must:• Submit a reading plan• Provide professional development for  teachers• Admini...
Effective Literacy TeachersSix critical qualities of excellent literacy teachers from the      International Reading Assoc...
Making it Work
CONGRATULATIONS!Since you are dedicated enough to make it to  the last session of the day, you get to go  home with a spec...
Five Principles of Phonics             Instruction1.   Base instruction on what students know.2.   Provide systematic inst...
Phonics Activities• Word Sorts (by sounds, syllables, etc.)• Make and Break Words• Rhyming Word Bingo/Word Family Bingo• P...
More Phonics Activities• “Secret Words” (How many words can you  make from a bigger word?)• Memory Match by letter sounds ...
More Phonics Activities• “Secret Words” (How many words can you make  from a bigger word?)• Memory Match by letter sounds ...
Two Important Things To       Remember:1. It’s okay to have a “nonsense”word or “rule breaker” category2. You can extend/a...
What should you knowabout phonemic awareness?“Phonemic Awareness is anything you can do           with your eyes shut.”• T...
Seven Dimensions of Phonemic              Awareness1. Ability to hear syllables within words2. Ability to hear initial let...
Phonemic Awareness          Activities•   Poems•   Tongue Twisters•   Songs•   Jump Rope Jingles•   Children’s Literature•...
Five Essential Ingredients for     Effective Direct Instruction of               Vocabulary1.   New words must be learned ...
Vocabulary ActivitiesPersonal Dictionaries:Each child should have their own folder/binder/notebook etc.  to record vocabul...
Vocabulary Activities•   Language Experience Approach•   Categorizing•   Crossword puzzles•   Analogies•   Concentration (...
Components of FluencyRateA slow rate is a common indicator of inefficient reading.A fast rate does indicate good reading c...
Fluency Activities•   Echo reading•   Choral reading•   Re-reading•   Read along with recorded books•   Tape, check, chart...
Components of Reading ComprehensionBefore Reading:• Predicting• Setting a purposeDuring Reading:• Making inferences• Self-...
Skills for Reading Informational Texts      (Expository or Non-fiction)•   Sequence•   Listing•   Classification or Hierar...
Comprehension Activities•   BME burger•   Directed Listening, Directed Reading and Experience/Text Relationships,    Recip...
Remember:    The more you read, the more you know   The more you know, the smarter you grow The smarter you grow, the stro...
Some of our favorite         sources:• Words Their Way (Baer)• When Kids Can’t Read (Beers)• Literacy Assessment and Inter...
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Inpec october 2012

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Inpec october 2012

  1. 1. A teacher’s job… is always to bridge from the know to the new. There really is no other choice. Children are who they are. They know what they know. They bring what they bring.Our job is not… to wish that students knew more or knew differently.Our job is… to turn students’ knowledge and the diversity of knowledge we encounter into a curricular strength rather than an instructional inconvenience.We can do that… only if we hold high expectations for all students, convey great respect for the knowledge and culture they bring to the classroom, and offer lots of support in helping them achieve those expectations. (Pearson 1996)
  2. 2. Can Your Basal ReaderMeet the Common Core?Strategies and Activities to Enhance Basal Reading Instruction October 18, 2012 Presented by: Cindy Collins and Jacque Singleton
  3. 3. Thought of the Day:If a doctor, a lawyer, or a dentist had forty people in his office at one time, all of whom had different needs, and some of who didn’t want to be there and were causing trouble, and the doctor, lawyer, or dentist (without assistance), had to treat all of them with professional excellence for nine month, then he might have some conception of the classroom teacher’s job. -Donald D. Quinn
  4. 4. Why are we here?• National Reading Panel Report, 1997/2000 – www.nationalreadingpanel.org – Five essential components of reading instruction: • Phonemic Awareness • Phonics • Vocabulary • Comprehension • Fluency
  5. 5. Why are we here? (continued)• February, 2011: IDOE adopted a proposed rule to implement the requirements of IC20-32-8.5• The Reading Framework was adopted. – Provides research-based guidance on components of effective reading instructions. – Key provisions include: • Reading goals • Instruction • Assessment • Professional Development • Leadership • Commitment
  6. 6. What does this mean to us?Each school must:• Submit a reading plan• Provide professional development for teachers• Administer a specified reading test (IREAD) and obtain a targeted passing percentage• Provide direct reading instruction for 90 minutes each day• Will begin using the Common Core Standards http://www.corestandards.org
  7. 7. Effective Literacy TeachersSix critical qualities of excellent literacy teachers from the International Reading Association:1. They understand reading and writing development and believe all children can learn to read and write.2. They continually assess children’s individual progress and relate reading instruction to children’s previous experiences.3. They know a variety of ways to teach reading, when to use each method, and how to combine the methods into an effective instructional program.4. They offer a variety of materials and texts for the children to read.5. They use flexible grouping strategies to tailor instruction for individuals.6. They are good reading “coaches”, that is, they provide help strategically.Effective literacy teacher continuously assess their students’ literacy abilities and adjust their instruction based on that assessment.
  8. 8. Making it Work
  9. 9. CONGRATULATIONS!Since you are dedicated enough to make it to the last session of the day, you get to go home with a special parting gift!We will be sharing activities and strategies that directly address the identified NRP components. These strategies and activities can be used with ANY story in ANY basal the minute you return to the classroom.
  10. 10. Five Principles of Phonics Instruction1. Base instruction on what students know.2. Provide systematic instruction.3. Provide explicit and extensive instruction.4. Use appropriate texts.5. Embed instruction in meaningful contexts.
  11. 11. Phonics Activities• Word Sorts (by sounds, syllables, etc.)• Make and Break Words• Rhyming Word Bingo/Word Family Bingo• Picture Sorts (by beginning, ending, or vowel)• Word family flip books• The Magic “E” (pan, pane; cap, cape)• Collect and sort vowel sounds with different spellings (long a – ai, a_e, ay)
  12. 12. More Phonics Activities• “Secret Words” (How many words can you make from a bigger word?)• Memory Match by letter sounds or onset/rime• Written conversations• “Human” word sorts – each child gets a card and has to find the right place to stand.• Bottles with letter beads and sand – shake to make words• Dice with letters, sounds, or onset/rime• Word hunts in stories or environment – search and record words with targeted phonics skill
  13. 13. More Phonics Activities• “Secret Words” (How many words can you make from a bigger word?)• Memory Match by letter sounds or onset/rime• Written conversations• “Human” word sorts – each child gets a card and has to find the right place to stand.• Bottles with letter beads and sand – shake to make words• Dice with letters, sounds, or onset/rime• Word hunts in stories or environment – search and record words with targeted phonics skill
  14. 14. Two Important Things To Remember:1. It’s okay to have a “nonsense”word or “rule breaker” category2. You can extend/adjust manyactivities by doing them in differentgrouping and having students recordwhat they’ve learned in notebooks, ondry erase boards, on overheads orchalkboards.
  15. 15. What should you knowabout phonemic awareness?“Phonemic Awareness is anything you can do with your eyes shut.”• The IRA states that phonemic awareness is “a child’s understanding and conscious awareness that speech is composed of identifiable units, such as spoken words, syllables, and sounds.”• ELL students struggle with phonemes because they differ from one language to another.
  16. 16. Seven Dimensions of Phonemic Awareness1. Ability to hear syllables within words2. Ability to hear initial letter sounds and recognize alliteration3. Ability to hear rime and rhyme (1-3:isolation & identity)4. Ability to distinguish oddity (categorization)5. Ability to blend sounds together orally to make a word (blending)6. Ability to segment words orally (segmentation)7. Ability to manipulate sounds orally to create new words (phoneme addition, deletion, substitution)
  17. 17. Phonemic Awareness Activities• Poems• Tongue Twisters• Songs• Jump Rope Jingles• Children’s Literature• Nursery Rhymes• Post-it Note Activity• “Secret” Words
  18. 18. Five Essential Ingredients for Effective Direct Instruction of Vocabulary1. New words must be learned in meaningful contexts.2. New words must be related to previous knowledge.3. New words/concepts must be fully understood so students can use the words in new situations.4. Students must use, hear, and see the new word repeatedly.5. Teachers should enjoy learning new words with students and make learning new words fun.
  19. 19. Vocabulary ActivitiesPersonal Dictionaries:Each child should have their own folder/binder/notebook etc. to record vocabulary. Alphabetical order is best!Activities:• Choose any word and write a sentence• Pick a letter and read all the words on a page to a buddy• Write a story using words off ___ pages• Choose a word and write the antonym and synonym• Give a clue to the class and let them guess the word• Choose a word and illustrate it. Have an art gallery.• Make a bingo card and play bingo• Put the words on flash cards and play around the word
  20. 20. Vocabulary Activities• Language Experience Approach• Categorizing• Crossword puzzles• Analogies• Concentration (memory match word to definition)• Scattergories• Charades• Word of the Day (synonyms, antonyms, draw a picture, write a sentence, give the definition, part of speech, etc.)
  21. 21. Components of FluencyRateA slow rate is a common indicator of inefficient reading.A fast rate does indicate good reading comprehension.AutomaticityAccuracy of word recognition and interpretation of punctuation and reading rate with little cognitive effort.Phrasing or ProsodyReader’s ability to recognize phrasing instead of seeing each word in isolation.ExpressionMaking written words sound like speechPunctuationUsing punctuation to interpret the author’s message.
  22. 22. Fluency Activities• Echo reading• Choral reading• Re-reading• Read along with recorded books• Tape, check, chart• Flash cards (can add stopwatch for rate)• Reader’s Theatre• Dyad (partner) reading
  23. 23. Components of Reading ComprehensionBefore Reading:• Predicting• Setting a purposeDuring Reading:• Making inferences• Self-monitoring• Visualizing• Connecting prior knowledgeAfter Reading:• Finding main ideas• Drawing conclusions• Elaborating on author’s intent
  24. 24. Skills for Reading Informational Texts (Expository or Non-fiction)• Sequence• Listing• Classification or Hierarchy• Compare/Contrast• Cause/Effect• Problem/Solution• Persuasion
  25. 25. Comprehension Activities• BME burger• Directed Listening, Directed Reading and Experience/Text Relationships, Reciprocal Questioning (handout)• Wordless Books• Graphic Organizers (KWL, Venn Diagrams, etc.)• Retelling (with puppets, orally, with a partner, with pictures, etc.)• Character perspective charts/projects• “And this is the rest of the story…”• Science experiments, crafts, math games (for informational texts)• Sequencing (pictures or writing)• Predicting• Learning logs or journals while reading informational texts• Time lines• Debates• Post-it notes, bookmarks for recording questions and thoughts while reading• Book Blessing• Silent Reading Time – with accountability (draw, write, partner share)• Reading aloud with probing questions (promotes listening comprehension)
  26. 26. Remember: The more you read, the more you know The more you know, the smarter you grow The smarter you grow, the stronger your voiceWhen speaking your mind and making your choice.
  27. 27. Some of our favorite sources:• Words Their Way (Baer)• When Kids Can’t Read (Beers)• Literacy Assessment and Intervention (DeVries)• Revisit, Reflect, Retell (Hoyt)

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