UUK AHSN discussion - higher education and health research

930 views

Published on

Universities are an indispensible part of the UK’s healthcare system. Their contribution is wide-ranging; universities sustain and enrich our health services not only by supplying and developing the healthcare workforce but also by operating as the crucibles for service innovation and excellence.


What role do universities play in health research and how are they placed to be involved in AHSNs?
 
What shape should AHSNs take and what might an ‘ideal’ AHSN look like?
 
What steps can we take to get there?

Published in: Education, Health & Medicine
0 Comments
0 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

No Downloads
Views
Total views
930
On SlideShare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
430
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
0
Comments
0
Likes
0
Embeds 0
No embeds

No notes for slide

UUK AHSN discussion - higher education and health research

  1. 1. AHSNs: from a university perspective July 2012
  2. 2. AHSNs: from a university perspective What role do universities play in health research and how are they placed to be involved in AHSNs?What shape should AHSNs take and what might an ‘ideal’ AHSN look like?What steps can we take to get there? 2
  3. 3. Contents1. Introduction and context2. Universities and health research3. Research through partnership4. Introducing the AHSN I. Scope, principles and outcomes II. Functions of the AHSN III. Still to be confirmed5. The ideal AHSN?6. Application process and timescale7. Conclusion 3
  4. 4. Introduction and contextInnovation is an aspiration, not a single process, the pursuit of which cantransform services and patient outcomes. While the UK’s capacity and capabilityfor health innovation is world-leading, the UK performs less well at disseminatingresearch and best practice.‘Innovation, Health and Wealth’, the Department of Health’s strategy forresearch and innovation, was released in December 2011. This has kick-started asignificant drive to encourage the adoption and spread of innovations inhealthcare. A flagship proposal is the establishment of ‘Academic Health ScienceNetworks’ (AHSNs).This discussion document looks at how universities could be involved in the newinnovation landscape. It outlines universities’ current role in research andinnovation, we ask what an ideal AHSN might look like and considers the manyfunctions that AHSNs will be taking on. 4
  5. 5. Universities and health researchUniversities are an indispensible part of the UK’s healthcare system. Theircontribution is wide-ranging; universities sustain and enrich our health servicesnot only by supplying and developing the healthcare workforce but also byoperating as the crucibles for service innovation and excellence.This activity is one of the most important contributions that universities make toour society. 50,000 health researchers working in universities £2.2bn health grants awarded to universities for health research of the world’s academic health publications have an author from 8.5% the UK The UK’s academic health publications have the highest citation 1st rate in the world The UK is the 2nd largest source of academic health publications 2nd in the world - more than France and Germany combined 1-in-3 hospitals in England are university hospitals 5
  6. 6. Universities and health researchMRI scanning, connecting lung cancer to smoking, the discovery of DNA, IVFtreatment and the Hepatitis B vaccine are just some of the results of researchcarried out by universities in partnership with health providers and industry.Yet universities’ involvement in health innovations is more than pure-scienceresearch: it ranges from the invention of new cures and service models throughto service implementation, assessment and education. Creating new medicines, improving existing Discovery and invention treatments, devising new service concepts Applying concepts to providers of care, Service enhancement enhancing patient pathways, improving information Evaluating technologies and Monitoring and assessing the effectiveness of organisations healthcare delivery Offering education and research opportunities Fostering innovation including through Clinical Academic Pathways 6
  7. 7. Universities and health research Involvement in health also spans a range of academic disciplines, including medicine, nursing and midwifery, allied health professions, economics, IT, business management, sociology, statistics, philosophy, and law. Research can be initiated by a range of drivers, from laboratories to charity services. E.g. laboratories – Health providers Experience and Bridging services and inventing and striving to improve evaluation of services research – inspiring ...improving treatments patient care and programmes innovative individuals 7
  8. 8. Research through partnershipHealth research in universities does not take place in isolation, rather it involvessuccessful collaborations. There are many examples of this: These are intensive collaborations between universities and NHSAcademic Health providers, applying new discoveries to health services. The five AHSCsScience Centres in operation in England focus on research, clinical services and also education and training.Health Innovation These are regionalised partnerships that have been rolled out nation-and Education wide. There are 17 HIECs working to sustain innovation and make theClusters transition from breakthrough to real change in healthcare. Examples include: The ‘Personal Social Services Research Unit’ operating in Manchester, Kent and LSE. Here universities and community services are working together to develop care models andSocial services assessment systems for mental health, elderly care and rehabilitation.partnerships The ‘Knowledge Transfer Partnership’ in York between the University of York and local councils aimed at ‘making research count’ and fostering innovative staff by encouraging research. 8
  9. 9. Introducing the AHSN‘Innovation, Health and Wealth’, the Department of Health’s strategy forresearch and innovation, was released in December 2011. The strategy aims toaddress some of the limitations of the UK health research system.One of the flagship proposals is to create Academic Health Science Networks (AHSNs). These networkswill aim to bring together a range of participantsincluding the local NHS, higher education institutionsand industry, and they will focus on improving theidentification, adoption and spread of innovativehealthcare. NHSBetween 12 and 18 AHSNs will be created, and they will commissionerscover a population of three to five million. Total fundingavailable is expected to be around £100 million. 9
  10. 10. Introducing the AHSN: Scope, principles and outcomesThere are significant ambitions for AHSNs. They are intended to apply a broaddefinition of innovation and achieve an extensive array of outcomes, whilstmaintaining a number of principles.Scope → Principles → Outcomes → Foster universal participation Improve the quality and productivity of Unite a range of organisations healthcare Work across organisationalBroad definition of innovation: boundaries Share learning and best practicetechnological, bio-medical,information, service and business Build on existing collaborations Improve population healthinnovations Develop links with levers Develop functions that benefit from Simplify the local innovation and and support innovation improvement landscape Create a culture of learning and Prevent duplication between bodies sharing Improve patient outcomes Multi-disciplinary professional andAll stages of the innovation clinical leadership and engagementprocess: horizon scanning, Enable the NHS and academia toadoption and diffusion collaborate with industry Harness the energy, expertise, collaboration and commitment between the partners Create wealth for the local and national economy 10 Exploit industry resources
  11. 11. Introducing the AHSN: Functions of the AHSNAlthough formal guidance and designation criteria are yet to be issued, AHSNswill be involved in the following activities: • Leading local work in the NHS on innovation General • Managing research participation and performance • Ensuring curricula are up-to-date with innovations • Identifying and prioritising innovationsIdentification • Monitoring innovation at each stage • Delivering research with the NIHR clinical research networks • Supporting industry research using NIHR model agreements and processes • Pump priming innovation projects • Running the Small Business Research Initiatives • Running innovation competitions • Supporting the adoption of nationally designated innovations • Accounting for adoption and implementation Adoption • Offering a single local governance framework • Supporting knowledge exchange networks • Applying improvement science to NHS services • Advising on intellectual property Spread • Supporting testing and commercialisation of ideas • Supporting NHS procurement teams • Communicating with other AHSNs 11
  12. 12. Introducing the AHSN: Still to be confirmedMany elements of this emerging system are undefined or yet to be confirmed;most crucially there is no prescribed format or configuration for AHSNs.Their shape and size will be heavily influenced by local factors such as existingpatient flows, current research relationships and local expertise.The membership structure, governance, hosting, funding, delivery and division offunctions are all also still to be determined. 12
  13. 13. The ideal AHSN?Although it is still unclear what configuration the AHSNs will take, from formativediscussions at least three conceptual models of configuration have emerged.These are ‘discovery-focused’, ‘acute-led’ and ‘community-led’. A discovery-focused AHSN?The discovery-focused model would beled and hosted by a nested university. Research-intensive universitiesDrawing on university resources, the AHSNwould have strong ties to NHS Industry providersinvention/discovery in technology,biotech, pharmaceuticals and NHS Community Local Otherservice/pathway design. commissioners services government groupsThis model would capitalise on existing connections between academia, NHSservices and industry. These existing relationships include Clinical AcademicPathways, student placements, university hospitals and research partnerships. 13
  14. 14. The ideal AHSN?In the acute-led model, acute hospitals or medical schools would both host andlead. There may be the potential for involvement from a wider range oforganisations.This AHSN model might typically grow from existing HIECs, benefitting fromexisting inter-disciplinary ties. This model would have particularly strong links toNHS Acute trusts. Universities would be vital partners, providing the link tocutting-edge university health research and connections to other resources suchas particular industries. An acute-led AHSN? NHS providers/medical schools NHS Universities Industry commissioners Community Local Other services government groups 14
  15. 15. The ideal AHSN?The community-led model could be led and hosted by a local authority. Thismodel would be well placed to focus on prevention and care offered close tohome. There might also be additional emphasis placed on social welfare, mentalhealth and the charity sector compared to other models.Universities would again be vital partners, providing the link to cutting-edgeuniversity health research and links to other resources such as particularindustries. A community-led AHSN? Community services NHS Local Other commissioners government groups NHS Industry Universities providers 15 15
  16. 16. The ideal AHSN?Different models will have different strengths. The regions of England will haveunique relationships and population needs. A one-size-fits-all approach will notbe sufficient to take into account the diverse regional innovation landscapes, andthe model chosen will affect the success of the AHSN. Discovery – Acute-led Community-led focused GENERAL Leading local work in the NHS on innovation Ensuring curricula are up-to-date with innovations←AHSN functions Managing research participation and performance IDENTIFICATION Identifying and prioritising innovations Delivering research with the NIHR clinical research networks Pump priming innovation projects Running innovation competitions Delivering research with the NIHR clinical research networks Monitoring innovation at each stage Supporting industry research using NIHR model agreements and processes Running the Small Business Research Initiatives Delivering research with the NIHR clinical research networks 16
  17. 17. The ideal AHSN?Different models will have different strengths. Discovery –  Acute-led Community-led focused ADOPTION Supporting the adoption of nationally designated innovations←AHSN functions Accounting for adoption and implementation SPREAD Applying improvement science to NHS services Supporting testing and commercialisation of ideas Communicating with other AHSNs Offering a single local governance framework Supporting knowledge exchange networks Advising on intellectual property Supporting NHS procurement teams 17
  18. 18. Application process and timescaleInterested organisations must engage with partners and submit an expression ofinterest by 20 July 2012. In this application, AHSNs must lay out the membershipand participation model for the network, leaving just a few weeks for interestedparties to engage. If unsuccessful, there will be a second round closing on 28February 2013. Yes d? u ire Round 1: ive d req ess to Round 2: i on s ce r k oc ial ss t re wo r ter pre es er tion p ma ws ex ter th of vie of f in fur igna ion in te r ion so is es iss el n iss ws ion k – on d bm an tio bm vie s s ac d u P na u pr e db e r: S n r: sig Re s te r Ex ee issu be atio be De y: l in tio n ly: t : F ce em plic ve m er : uar an e na Ju us n pt p No m b nt br P sig 20 ug uida Se rt a e r/ ve eme Fe rest ril: De ent 3 A al g 30 p po ct o b No c 28 inte /Ap y: F in su O 30 noun f rc h Ma ncem o Ma 31 nou an an Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun 18
  19. 19. ConclusionHealth research benefits from a multiplicity of drivers, settings, and collaboratorsand draws from a wide range of sectors and disciplines. At the same time, thisdiversity presents challenges for strategic oversight, knowledge exchange andminimising duplication.The scope, principles and planned outcomes of AHSNs are a reflection of thispicture. The rewards will be great but these new networks require carefulconsideration. Their planned implementation represents a rapid change to thehealth innovation landscape.Health research is one of the most important contributions that universitiesmake to our society. AHSNs provide an opportunity to maximise the impact ofthis research and universities are looking forward to playing an integral role inthe identification, adoption and spread of innovation. 19
  20. 20. ConclusionWith just weeks to go before the initial application deadline, several questionsneed to be answered: Governance and formation:  • How should universities and partners approach one another regarding application processing for AHSN designation? • How should current local relationships be adapted in order to identify potential models for future work within AHSNs? • How can an AHSN maximise its contribution in an extensive regional network? Metrics and disseminating information: • What activities should an AHSN undertake to gather better information on new innovation developments and their dissemination? Monitoring progress and evaluation: • How can a regional network work with others to define useful indictors of ‘successful’ innovation and dissemination? Incentivising innovation and dissemination:  • How can universities work with partners to reward and encourage innovation and new ways of working? 20
  21. 21. Sources and linksDH 2012 ‘Academic Health Science Networks’http://www.dh.gov.uk/health/files/2012/06/Academic-Health-Science-Networks-21062012-gw-17626-PDF-229K.pdfHESA 2012BIS ‘International Comparative Performance of the UK Research Base’ 2011:http://www.bis.gov.uk/assets/biscore/science/docs/i/11-p123-international-comparative-performance-uk-research-base-2011Saskatchewan AHSN http://www.saskhealthsciencesnetwork.usask.ca/about-sahsn/documents.phpToronto AHSN http://www.tahsn.ca/ 21

×