© Electricity4Gas.com

No part of this document shall be reproduced or resold without
permission from an authorised repres...
Table of Contents
Introduction - Electric car benefits, electrical terminology, tools
& parts needed

Chapter 1 - Finding ...
Introduction
Dear Friend,

Congratulations on investing in the Electricity4Gas manual.

You are in a small group of people...
Enjoy!




   Why should you convert your car to run on electricity?

There are many reasons to convert your car to electr...
Electrical terminology


Below we explain some of the electrical terms used in this
guide:

Wattage (watts) - A measure of...
Tools needed before you start

The first step is to have a work area. Make sure you have plenty
of space to make the proce...
• Small grinder




• A socket set




• Various wrenches (both imperial and metric measurement)




• Screw drivers




•...
• Welding equipment




• Work bench




Tips on obtaining these tools:

• Look out for sales – Look out for in-store-sale...
Further notes on welding

At some point you will need to weld battery holders and other
parts.

An electric arc welder or ...
A crimping tool to install cable ends
Charger
DC-DC power supply
E-Meter or several digital meters
Fuses
Inertia switch
Lu...
Chapter 1
                    Find a vehicle to convert




• We recommend a small vehicle for the conversion. A smaller
 ...
• Look for a car that does not have a working motor. This will
  push the price down. You are going to be removing the mot...
Chapter 2
                         Electric motors

When converting your car to electric there are two choices: DC
electri...
• Amps – A high current is good.

• Voltage – Should be at least 12 Volts. (As a general rule of
  thumb, look for between...
Where you can buy a Permanent Magnet DC Motor:

• http://www.motors.ebay.com/ - Seller’s prices are normally
  reasonable ...
• Asking a friend whom likes working on cars. They may have
  access to one.



                          AC Motors

AC (a...
AC motors can produce much higher power ranges (longer
driving distances before re-charging the batteries) for the same
si...
Chapter 3

                       Motor controllers

A motor controller is needed to convert proper voltage between
the ba...
AC controllers

As discussed previously, AC controllers come as a unit with an
AC motor.

AC controllers have been designe...
Chapter 4

                             Batteries




Batteries are at the heart of your electric car. They are used to
st...
Nickel metal hydride (NiMH)

They have a high energy density ie. a great deal of energy can
be packed into a relatively sm...
When looking at particular types and brands of batteries you
need to consider these things:

• Weight – The lighter the ba...
Ask your local golf course manager if you could have their old
golf cart batteries. They will probably be happy to give th...
You can take a look at it here:
http://www.electricity4gas.com/batteryreconditioning.html



Another source of FREE batter...
Battery Chargers

We recommend having a battery charger mounted in your
vehicle. This will allow you to recharge your vehi...
Battery Safety

When determining where to place the battery housing (ie. where
the batteries are kept), ensure the batteri...
Chapter 5

In this chapter we take a closer look at the parts involved with
your electric vehicle conversion.


          ...
• A coupling device comes with the adaptor. The coupling
  device connects the motor shaft with the shaft of the
  transmi...
Fuses

All circuits should have fuses installed in line in case of a short
circuit. We recommend having fuses installed in...
The throttle (‘gas pedal’)

To make the car go, you put your foot on the pedal, the same as
you would in a gas car.

To ma...
Chapter 6
In this chapter we get started with your electric vehicle
conversion.

-----
Tip before we start: Use a hoist fo...
Heavy ground wires can be removed.



             Unneeded parts to take off your car:

• Remove the exhaust system. Your...
Parts to keep/the building process:


• Removing the transmission (temporarily): Once the engine is
  out, disconnect the ...
A rear wheel drive vehicle has more room under the hood.

The major vehicles used in conversions all have special adaptors...
You can make a cradle assembly (frame), by welding a few
pieces of angle iron together. The frame can be bolted into the
m...
Chapter 7
In this chapter we look at further steps involved in your electric
vehicle conversion.



                      ...
• Batteries are heavy, so when you install them check how the
  car suspension is handling the weight. Mounting the batter...
These devices will run on a pulley system, powered by the
electric motor. The pulleys must align straight (kept on the sam...
• Put the volt meter on top. Also put the charger on top so it is
  easy to access, when you need to plug in a charge.

• ...
Connecting the batteries
The batteries connect to each other in series: negative (-) to
positive (+) and positive (+) to n...
• Never ground the wires, only connect them in series. In your
   gas-powered car your electric supply is grounded, but th...
Chapter 8

             Final checks to make & steps to take

• Check that the throttle connections are working properly. ...
• Connect your final battery leads. Use gloves for this
  connection, as there will be a spark when the capacitors in the
...
-----
Final tips to keep the cost of your conversion low:

• Make sure you look for free and cheap parts from the sources
...
Chapter 9

                      Helpful Resources:

If you are seeking some assistance in converting your vehicle to
elec...
UK

The Battery Vehicle Society
http://www.batteryvehiclesociety.org.uk


Electric Auto Association
– Arguably the biggest...
web site. All are welcome to join us beforehand (6pm - 6:30) at
The White Spot Restaurant, 4129 Lougheed Hwy, Burnaby, BC
...
Location: Copper Queen Library,6 Main Street, Bisbee, Arizona
85603

Flagstaff EAA
Web Site: flagstaffeaa.org/index.html
C...
Mailing: 323 Los Altos Drive, Aptos, CA 95003
Meetings: Call or see web site for meeting information.
Location: Calvary Ch...
November
Location: Cool River Pizza, 6200 Stanford Ranch Road,
Rocklin, CA 95677

Konocti EAA
Web Site: konoctieaa.org
Con...
Mailing: 87 Mt. Tallac Ct., San Rafael, CA 94903
Meetings: 11am to 1pm, 1st Saturday of the month
Location: Luscious Garag...
Mailing: 283 Bethany Court, Thousand Oaks, CA 91360-2013
Meetings: Please contact Bruce for time and location


Florida

F...
Illinois

Fox Valley EAA
Web Site: fveaa.org
Contact: Ted Lowe <ted.lowe@fveaa.org>, (630) 260-0424
Mailing: P.O. Box 214,...
Michigan EAA
Coming Web Site: michiganEAA.org
Contact: Larry Tuttle <larrytuttle@gmail.com>, (734) 995-9904
Mailing: 1620 ...
Alternative Transportation Club, EAA
Web Site: electricnevada.org
Contact: Bob Tregilus <lakeport104@yahoo.com>, (775) 826...
Mailing: 1317 Middle Sound, Wilmington, NC 28411
Meetings: Please contact us for time and date

Piedmont Carolina Electric...
Oregon Electric Vehicle Association
Web Site: oeva.org
Contact: Rick Barnes <barnes.rick@verizon.net>,
Mailing: 19100 SW V...
Mailing: 9211 Autumn Branches, San Antonio TX 78254
Meetings: 3:00 p.m. 3rd Sunday of January, March, May, June,
July, Aug...
Utah EV Coalition
Web Site: saltflats.com. Utah Salt Flats Racing Association
meeting (USFRA); we are the Official Bonnevi...
Wisconsin
Southern Wisconsin EV Proliferation
Web Site: emissionsfreecars.com
Contact: Mike Turner <mike.turner@emissionsf...
Chapter 10

My Home-Made Renewable Solar & Wind Energy
Recommendation


  How to power your electric car for free, and sla...
After another 5 hours spent and $120, I had my own wind mill
generator.

I just had to try both these systems. And I had a...
If you want to save money on your electricity bill, be energy
independent, and help our environment, then click the websit...
From all of us at Electricity4Gas.com, thankyou for
doing your part to help the environment.

Enjoy driving your electric ...
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in …5
×

Electricity4gasguide By Bernabe Rios

917 views

Published on

Published in: Technology
0 Comments
0 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

No Downloads
Views
Total views
917
On SlideShare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
4
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
13
Comments
0
Likes
0
Embeds 0
No embeds

No notes for slide

Electricity4gasguide By Bernabe Rios

  1. 1. © Electricity4Gas.com No part of this document shall be reproduced or resold without permission from an authorised representative at Electricity4Gas.com We reserve the right to prosecute and seek damages from an individual or company that violates this, under 17 U.S.C. § 506(a) and 18 U.S.C. § 2319. LEGAL DISCLAIMER THIS MANUAL IS PROVIDED FOR INFORMATION PURPOSES ONLY The author and any other parties directly or indirectly associated with Electricity4Gas.com accept no financial, legal or any other type of responsibility when you follow the information in this document. If you do not agree to accept this disclaimer, please do not continue reading this manual.
  2. 2. Table of Contents Introduction - Electric car benefits, electrical terminology, tools & parts needed Chapter 1 - Finding a vehicle to convert Chapter 2 - Information about DC & AC electric motors Chapter 3 - Information about DC & AC motor controllers Chapter 4 - Information about batteries, how to obtain them Chapter 5 - A closer look at the various parts involved with your electric vehicle conversion Chapter 6 - Getting started with your electric vehicle conversion. Includes removing wires, removing unneeded parts, installing the motor/transmission Chapter 7 - Further steps involved in your electric vehicle conversion. Includes installing batteries and installing other vehicle parts. Chapter 8 - Final checks to make and steps to take, starting up your electric car for the first time Chapter 9 - Helpful resources Chapter 10 – My Home-Made Renewable Solar & Wind Energy Recommendation
  3. 3. Introduction Dear Friend, Congratulations on investing in the Electricity4Gas manual. You are in a small group of people. Not many people are intelligent or informed enough to make such a good choice and save themselves money and help the environment at the same time. You will soon be on your way to eliminating all gasoline costs, and reducing emissions. The instructions and plans in this guide have worked previously for others and should work for you. If this is all new to you it may seem complicated at first. We suggest you take your time, and re-read the guide a couple of times. You always have the option of seeking assistance from a competent mechanic, or a mechanically minded friend, family member or acquaintance perhaps, should you need help with something. There are a number of text links (that appear in blue) through out this guide. If you are unfamiliar with the Internet, by clicking on these links, you will be taken to a web page. Please make sure you are connected to the Internet before clicking on the links. We have created this manual to be a no-nonsense straight-to- the-point guide. We’ve kept the manual simple so it’s easy to read, and we haven’t ‘padded’ or added ‘fluff’ just to make it appear bigger.
  4. 4. Enjoy! Why should you convert your car to run on electricity? There are many reasons to convert your car to electric, we could talk about it for hours, but since we’re keeping it simple here are the three big reasons: Environment – An electric vehicle has almost zero emissions. Current gasoline cars are big contributors to air pollution. Cost – The cost of running your vehicle on electricity is very small in comparison to a vehicle that runs on gasoline. You will save hundreds or thousands of dollars a year, when you don’t have to pay for gasoline. Minimal maintenance – There is minimal maintenance involved in running an electric vehicle. Compare that to oil leaks, engine breakdowns, exhaust system problems etc with a gasoline car. You will save hundreds of dollars a year on maintenance costs.
  5. 5. Electrical terminology Below we explain some of the electrical terms used in this guide: Wattage (watts) - A measure of the amount of work done by a certain amount of electric current (amperage) at a certain pressure (voltage). Volts - a type of "pressure" that drives electrical charges through a circuit. Amperage (Amps) - The rate of flow of electricity through wire. Kilowatt Hour - The work performed by one kilowatt of electric power in one hour. An example is a 100-watt light bulb that is turned on for ten hours. The power rate would be 100 x 10 = 1,000 watt-hours or 1 Kilowatt hour. Direct Current (DC) & Alternating Current (AC) - Direct Current is self-explanatory. Alternating Current is an electric current that reverses direction, usually many times per second. The most important difference between AC and DC power is that DC current can be stored in a battery while AC power cannot. Common DC voltages are 12, 24 and 48.
  6. 6. Tools needed before you start The first step is to have a work area. Make sure you have plenty of space to make the process as easy as possible. There is grinding and fitting of metal involved so you should consider doing that kind of work outside. The tools you may use include: • A hoist • Clamps and vice grips • Cordless drill • Jigsaw
  7. 7. • Small grinder • A socket set • Various wrenches (both imperial and metric measurement) • Screw drivers • Sand paper
  8. 8. • Welding equipment • Work bench Tips on obtaining these tools: • Look out for sales – Look out for in-store-sales where you can buy inexpensive tools for your home workshop. • Ask for tools as birthday & Christmas presents. • Look for cheap tools at auctions and yard sales. • You could rent these tools. • You can ask some friends or family members to borrow their tools.
  9. 9. Further notes on welding At some point you will need to weld battery holders and other parts. An electric arc welder or mig welder that has at least 220 volts (and at least 100 amps of power output) should be used. If you are not comfortable welding, you could ask someone you know with welding experience to help, or you could hire a professional to do it for you. If you choose to do it yourself, please remember that you are dealing with hot metal. Be very careful and be sure to wear protective clothing and welding mask. Alternatively you can bolt everything together, but welding is preferred. Parts list Parts that will be used in making your electric car: Amp meter shunt Battery ends Battery cables Batteries Battery shelves/holders (make your own) Cable cutters
  10. 10. A crimping tool to install cable ends Charger DC-DC power supply E-Meter or several digital meters Fuses Inertia switch Lugs Motor – AC or DC Motor controller Manual disconnect Motor adaptor Main contactor Miscellaneous nuts and bolts Vacuum pump (to bleed power brakes) Throttle control box Electric Vehicle (EV) Wiring Diagram Below is a diagram of the electrical circuit of an electric vehicle. (Diagram is not drawn to scale)
  11. 11. Chapter 1 Find a vehicle to convert • We recommend a small vehicle for the conversion. A smaller vehicle is lighter and therefore requires less power (and batteries) to move. A smaller vehicle (relative to a larger vehicle) will allow you to travel longer distances before having to recharge the batteries. • You must find a car that has a manual transmission. Automatic transmissions have energy losses that reduce performance. Also, the shift points (revs) will not be appropriate on hills, and may damage the motor. Finally, the automatic relies on an idling engine to keep the hydraulic pressure up. When an electric car stops at a stoplight, the motor stops turning, and the transmission loses pressure. When the light turns green, there is a delayed response to the throttle while pressure builds up. (This could be dangerous) • It is important to find a car that has a good body. Apart from the obvious visual appeal of a nice looking car, you want the car to be safe, not full of rust etc. Your car may need to pass a roadworthy/vehicle inspection (depending on your country and state).
  12. 12. • Look for a car that does not have a working motor. This will push the price down. You are going to be removing the motor whether it works or not, so there is no point paying extra money for an unneeded working motor. (If you do have a vehicle with a working motor, you could sell it to your local car scrapping/wrecking place, or you could place an ad in your local paper, or list the parts on ebay.) There are many varied ways to find a car (meeting the above criteria) For example you can find plenty of bargains with on line auctions such as http://www.motors.ebay.com/
  13. 13. Chapter 2 Electric motors When converting your car to electric there are two choices: DC electric motors and AC electric motors. DC Motors The DC motor will produce the power to run your car. What you should be looking for is a “Permanent Magnet DC Motor” The attributes of this motor that you need to pay attention to: • Revolutions per minute (RPM) – Should be fairly low. (As a general rule of thumb, look for RPM under 400.) • Shaft size – As a general rule of thumb, the shaft size should be over 5/8 of an inch. This will insure that your DC motor has adequate bushings to accommodate the constant spinning.
  14. 14. • Amps – A high current is good. • Voltage – Should be at least 12 Volts. (As a general rule of thumb, look for between 50 and 80 Volts.) The average car requires a 20 horsepower motor to drive at a speed of 50 miles-per-hour on a level surface (down the highway for example.) Horsepower will vary with volts and amps. Below is some power conversion formulas that may help you understand how horsepower is calculated. Amps x Volts = Watts watts / Volts = Amps 1000 watts = 1 kilowatt .75 kilowatts = 1 horsepower 1 kilowatt = 1.34 horsepower (Side note: You shouldn't technically compare electric motors to gas engines. Electric motors and gas engines measure power ratings differently. Gas engines are rated at their peak horsepower even though they can only maintain it for a few minutes without overheating or breaking. Electric motors are rated at their continuous horsepower, which they can maintain indefinitely.) DC motors can be connected directly to the transmission. Or they can be connected to the drive axle. (If you choose this option, you need to use relay switches in order to go in reverse.)
  15. 15. Where you can buy a Permanent Magnet DC Motor: • http://www.motors.ebay.com/ - Seller’s prices are normally reasonable for DC Motors. You will find a mix of used and new DC motors on ebay. • Search the Internet. Go to google.com or your preferred search engine, and search for “Buy Permanent Magnet DC Motor” or “Permanent Magnet DC Motor (insert the name of your suburb, city or state)” After a short time of searching, you should be able to find a company selling them in your suburb, city or state. • Ask at your local auto parts store. You may be able to find a FREE or cheap DC motor, by: • Asking around at scrap metal places. Companies regularly scrap old machinery, which have DC motors. • Asking businesses in your local industrial area. Within an industrial center there will be manufacturing plants. Ask to speak with the maintenance or operations manager of the manufacturing plant. Ask the manager for their old DC motors. Due to maintenance and capital depreciation schedules these companies regularly replace (working) parts. By asking the manager (or people with authority) politely and explaining to them why you want the parts you will be surprised how many free parts (that the company no longer wants) you can get.
  16. 16. • Asking a friend whom likes working on cars. They may have access to one. AC Motors AC (alternating current) motors are just like the ones found in your home appliances. A motor controller mechanism (discussed in chapter 3) comes directly with an AC Motor. One of the biggest advantages of AC motors is they can be used for braking. The energy used in braking can be converted into power, to charge your batteries. (This is called regenerative braking, and can be found in all the new electric cars produced by the car companies.) The regenerative capacity is built into the motor controller. This is why the AC motor and controller are sold as a package.
  17. 17. AC motors can produce much higher power ranges (longer driving distances before re-charging the batteries) for the same sized motor when compared to DC. Most AC motors are connected to the drive axle, however you can connect them to the transmission. The price of an AC motor can be much higher than a DC motor, but has its advantages of regenerative braking and higher power ranges. If you are on a budget, we recommend DC. They are cheaper and can be used in any vehicle.
  18. 18. Chapter 3 Motor controllers A motor controller is needed to convert proper voltage between the battery and the motor. It controls the speed of the vehicle when you press the ‘gas’ pedal. There are two choices of motor controllers: DC controllers and AC controllers DC Controllers Smaller less expensive controllers are very limited and you can expect slower acceleration. Ideally you should get a controller that is designed to handle over 100-volt battery storage. At this range you will have acceleration to match or even go faster, than an average gasoline vehicle. It should be noted that when you get into this range, your performance increases (but so does the price).
  19. 19. AC controllers As discussed previously, AC controllers come as a unit with an AC motor. AC controllers have been designed to take the regenerative energy out of the braking to be used in charging the batteries. If you choose an AC motor you will not need to find a separate AC controller. Where you can buy controllers: http://www.motors.ebay.com/ http://www.beepscom.com/category_s/5.htm http://www.evparts.com/ http://www.kta-ev.com/ http://www.evmerica.com http://www.canev.com http://www.metricmind.com/ http://www.cafeelectric.com http://www.grassrootsev.com/control.htm http://www.electricvehiclesusa.com/category_s/140.htm http://www.ev-america.com/ Where you can find a FREE controller As discussed in chapter 2, you can find free or cheap parts (including motor controllers), by asking around at scrap metal places and businesses in local industrial areas.
  20. 20. Chapter 4 Batteries Batteries are at the heart of your electric car. They are used to store DC electricity. There are three types of rechargeable battery suitable for electric car use. Those types are lead-acid batteries, nickel metal hydride (NiMH) batteries, and lithium-ion (Li-ion) batteries. Lead-acid Lead-acid batteries are the oldest form of rechargeable battery still in use. They've been used in all types of cars - including electric cars, since the 19th century. Lead-acid batteries are a kind of wet cell battery and usually contain a mild solution of sulfuric acid in an open container. The major advantage of lead-acid batteries is they are well understood and they have a low cost. The have a recharge time of approximately 8 hours. They have the lowest life cycle out of the batteries we are discussing.
  21. 21. Nickel metal hydride (NiMH) They have a high energy density ie. a great deal of energy can be packed into a relatively small battery. When you use these batteries your driving range will be increased (relative to lead-acid batteries). These batteries don't contain any toxic metals so they're easy to recycle. They are not as susceptible to heat and they have a shorter recharging time (relative to lead-acid batteries) These batteries are ideal over lead acid batteries, however the high cost is a major issue. Lithium-ion (Li-ion) Lithium-ion (Li-ion) batteries are even better than lead-acid & nickel metal hydride (NiMH) batteries They have a very high energy density, are lightweight, have a long battery life and are quick to recharge. However they are extremely expensive. If you are on a budget we recommend lead acid batteries. They are the easiest to obtain and they have the lowest cost.
  22. 22. When looking at particular types and brands of batteries you need to consider these things: • Weight – The lighter the battery the better. • Amperage (amps) – The greater the amps, the longer your driving range will be. • Maintenance – Is it required? All the above factors will play a part in determining the price of the battery. Batteries come in many sizes but try and look for batteries that have at least a 20 hour rating, and have over 200 amps of power usage. You will need in the range of 20 batteries to run your vehicle effectively. As we mentioned, batteries can be expensive. In fact they can be the biggest expense of your project. How you can find FREE batteries: Golf courses/shops Golf cart batteries are recommended for electric car conversions.
  23. 23. Ask your local golf course manager if you could have their old golf cart batteries. They will probably be happy to give them away, because otherwise they have to pay someone to remove them. You might find that some of the batteries don’t work, however you can revive (recondition) them. How to revive these old batteries About 4 out of 5 ‘dead’ batteries are just ‘sulfated’ ie. Sulfate crystals have developed on the surface of the plates inside the battery. This happens when the batteries are left in an undercharged state. The batteries can be taken apart and cleaned, but it is very dangerous and needs to be done by a professional. If you don’t want to pay a professional, we recommend you have a look at the “Battery Reconditioning Report”. It teaches you how to revive batteries yourself safely. The creators of the report have a great knowledge of batteries.
  24. 24. You can take a look at it here: http://www.electricity4gas.com/batteryreconditioning.html Another source of FREE batteries: Industrial centers Forklift batteries are also good for electric car conversions. Find an industrial center and within it there will be manufacturing plants. Ask to speak with the maintenance or operations manager of the manufacturing plant. Ask the manager for their old forklift batteries. Industrial forklift batteries are very expensive and last up to 20 years. However due to maintenance and capital depreciation schedules, these companies generally replace the battery every 5 years.
  25. 25. Battery Chargers We recommend having a battery charger mounted in your vehicle. This will allow you to recharge your vehicle anywhere, anytime. You can not just use an off the shelf charger from the store. You will need a special battery charger. Your charger should: • Be adjustable to whatever battery voltage you are running in your system. • Shut off once your batteries are charged. (This is necessary to ensure you do not end the battery life prematurely.) Where you can buy batteries and chargers http://www.beepscom.com/category_s/2.htm http://www.evparts.com/cat- Batteries+...+Street+Vehicle.htm#53 http://www.canev.com/KitsComp/Components/Chargers.html http://www.metricmind.com/ http://www.manzanitamicro.com/ http://www.canev.com/KitsComp/Components/Chargers.html http://www.electricvehiclesusa.com/category_s/153.htm
  26. 26. Battery Safety When determining where to place the battery housing (ie. where the batteries are kept), ensure the batteries are kept away from: • electrical components, which can be a source of spark • sources of heat or possible sources of open flame Read all of the manufacturer's recommendations and warnings about the safe use of batteries.
  27. 27. Chapter 5 In this chapter we take a closer look at the parts involved with your electric vehicle conversion. Connecting motor to drive train After you take out the gas engine from your vehicle, you will need to connect the electric motor to the drive train. • Most of the recommended sources of motors come with an adaptor kit. The kit makes it easy to attach the electric motor to the drive train. The adaptor bolts to the transmission (or housing of transmission) and the electric motor bolts to the other side. The adaptor must be mounted with the correct spacing and aligned straight, so it will spin freely with the motor.
  28. 28. • A coupling device comes with the adaptor. The coupling device connects the motor shaft with the shaft of the transmission. Electrical circuits There is a contact on the adaptor that runs from the motor controller. This is started with the ignition switch when you start your electric car. (Having a manual disconnect along this circuit, will ensure you won’t get ‘zapped’ when you are working on your car.) ----- Tip for when dealing with electrical circuits and lines: Use a simple ammeter and voltmeter to measure power output and the charging process. ----- Auxiliary system (lighting, radio etc) To maintain your ordinary vehicle battery and your on board electrical systems (lighting, radio etc) there needs to be a simple auxiliary 12 volt charging system. A simple DC converter will take the high voltage of your large DC motor and break it down to 12 volts. OR (we recommend) mounting an alternator on the motor assembly. To do this, a simple adaptor unit can be purchased that will run your system at about 13.5 volts.
  29. 29. Fuses All circuits should have fuses installed in line in case of a short circuit. We recommend having fuses installed in both positive and negative feeds. Fuses are crucial. If for some reason there was an extreme electrical charge, you want the fuse to blow, not your engine or batteries. ----- Convenience yip: Carry extra fuses with you in your car. ----- Connecting the batteries You will need about 35 feet of battery cable. Use large cable such as 2.0 welding cable or bigger. It is flexible and large to carry a lot of current. The batteries connect to each other in series: negative (-) to positive (+) and positive (+) to negative (-). Color-code your wire: red is positive and black is negative. You will want to crimp the ends of the wire effectively and seal them too with a cable end sealer to prevent leaks of current. If you don’t seal the end, you will reduce your power and range. ----- Battery tip: When batteries are cold they hold about 50% of their regular charge. It’s simple and cheap to install a heater in the car and a small heater near your battery boxes to keep them warm. -----
  30. 30. The throttle (‘gas pedal’) To make the car go, you put your foot on the pedal, the same as you would in a gas car. To make this happen, you need to mount a throttle box near your throttle control (gas pedal linkage). Braking/Stopping A small vacuum pump and a reserve tank for fluid is needed to power your brakes.
  31. 31. Chapter 6 In this chapter we get started with your electric vehicle conversion. ----- Tip before we start: Use a hoist for installing or removing heavy parts. Make sure you have a partner to help you throughout this process. ----- Take measurements The first step is to take and record various measurements. Once the engine is removed it may seem like there is plenty of space, but without proper planning it will quickly run out. Removing wiring Do not remove all the wires when you remove the gas engine. Some of the wires will be used when you install the electric motor. You must keep a proper record of where all the wires go. You could use a roll of tape, and attach it to the wires to help you keep a record. The following wiring must be kept: • control wires and dash mount wires (they come in bundles) • ignition wires • coil wires • starter wire • speedometer wiring
  32. 32. Heavy ground wires can be removed. Unneeded parts to take off your car: • Remove the exhaust system. Your new electric car won’t produce exhaust. • Remove the fuel system and gas tank. They are no longer needed. Run your car empty of gas before removing. Gas is very flammable, so be careful of sparks when removing the gas tank and the fuel lines. • Remove the engine radiator and fans. They are no longer needed. • For now you need to remove the power steering pump and air conditioning. However make sure you keep them, because you can re-install them later on (discussed in chapter 7). • Remove the engine. Once you have unbolted the mounts, you can remove the engine. You will notice that you have to remove the engine at an angle so it can clear the engine compartment. Before removing the engine, drain out all transmission fluid.
  33. 33. Parts to keep/the building process: • Removing the transmission (temporarily): Once the engine is out, disconnect the transmission and install the electric motor and adaptor kit. Once the electric motor is mounted, you will reinstall the transmission, by bolting it to the transmission mounts once again. When reinstalling the transmission/motor assembly, measure the distance from the flywheel to the engine block. You must keep the same distance when hooking up the electric motor to the transmission. • The adaptor kit provides a coupler (joiner) to fit the flywheel to the rear shaft of your motor. (You will need to remove the flywheel, which is attached to the transmission first) The coupler has a spacer that goes on first and this will provide the right distance to the housing for the flywheel. • First you should fit the adaptor to the motor, then attach the flywheel, then bolt on the clutch. This whole assembly is then attached to the housing of the transmission. ----- Side Note: How easy this process is depends on your type of vehicle.
  34. 34. A rear wheel drive vehicle has more room under the hood. The major vehicles used in conversions all have special adaptors made to do the conversion. Before deciding on what type of vehicle you want to convert, we recommend you ask the opinion of the adaptor supply houses. A few companies that sell adaptors: http://www.grassrotsev.com/catalog.htm http://www.canev.com/ http://www.evparts.com ----- After this is completed you can put the whole motor and transmission system back in the vehicle. When placing it back in the vehicle, the motor/transmission needs to align (be at the same height) with the drive shaft. The transmission support members are then bolted back in place. Securing the motor/transmission assembly The DC motor used is strong enough to move itself out of position, if it is not secured. Commercial motor mounts are available for purchase, but you can build your own for a fraction of the cost.
  35. 35. You can make a cradle assembly (frame), by welding a few pieces of angle iron together. The frame can be bolted into the motor mount holes found on the DC electric motor. When designing/making the frame, make sure all parts will fit, before you start welding. NEVER weld near the electric motor, as it will damage it.
  36. 36. Chapter 7 In this chapter we look at further steps involved in your electric vehicle conversion. Battery placement The batteries can go in the engine compartment or in the frame somewhere (back seat or trunk of car for example). If you are converting a truck you can also place the batteries in the bed. A few things to consider, when deciding where to place the batteries: • The closer the batteries are placed to the motor assembly the less wire is used. • If you use lead acid batteries, they require monthly maintenance. (You will need easy access to maintain them.) • Consider if you have any passengers and their safety near the batteries. (Sealed batteries are safer in the case of accidents or with passengers close by.) • You can place batteries in the trunk space effectively, however it reduces your hauling capabilities. • After taking out the gas engine and installing the electric motor, there will be spare space. You can place battery holder frames (and batteries) in this location. However you can not take all the space with batteries, because the controller and charger also need to be mounted in this area.
  37. 37. • Batteries are heavy, so when you install them check how the car suspension is handling the weight. Mounting the batteries in various locations should help ‘balance it out’. ----- Side note: You should aim to have at least 20 batteries. The range of your vehicle is determined by your battery capacity. The more batteries you have the longer you can travel between charges. ----- Building racks for your batteries Regardless of where the batteries are placed you need to build a rack/compartment to hold and secure them. Steel, stainless steel or angle iron is recommended for the bottom plate to hold your batteries. Do some simple welding to create the edges that hold the batteries in. You could easily find this material at rubbish tips or industrial yards. Re-installing power steering pump & air conditioning The power steering pump/system and air conditioning can be remounted. If you mount them just above the electric motor you should be able to retain the original hoses from the former gas motor.
  38. 38. These devices will run on a pulley system, powered by the electric motor. The pulleys must align straight (kept on the same centerline) or the belt will run off. Take your time and use a small level to get it right. You can usually use the same pulley assembly, which was used on the old gas motor. The pulley probably won’t fit immediately because the electric motor shaft is a different size to the gas motor. To overcome this problem you can grind the pulley (not the shaft) to make it fit. Mounting other battery related parts Plywood is recommended when building a rack for controller, contacts & battery charger. You may want to consider a variation of a shelf design that fits the controller and battery charger in securely. Placing the shelf/rack on slight tilt is recommended, so water will drain away and not sit on the surface. When placing the components in your rack/shelf:
  39. 39. • Put the volt meter on top. Also put the charger on top so it is easy to access, when you need to plug in a charge. • Put the DC converter (that charges your 12 volt system) on the bottom, along with the main contactor. Above are just our suggestions of how to set your wiring/electrical. Set it up however you think is practical. Below is an example of a wiring diagram from an electric vehicle. (Diagram is not drawn to scale)
  40. 40. Connecting the batteries The batteries connect to each other in series: negative (-) to positive (+) and positive (+) to negative (-). Color-code your wire: red is positive and black is negative. Starting with the first battery connect positive to negative on the next battery, and negative to positive, and so on. As mentioned previously, you should use large cable such as 2.0 welding cable or bigger. It is flexible and large to carry a lot of current. (You will want to crimp the ends of the wire effectively and seal them too with a cable end sealer to prevent leaks of current. If you don’t seal the end, you will reduce your power and range.) The cable is connected to each battery forming a series and finally it is connected to the motor controller. ----- Safety tips & recommendations: You are working with high voltages. We recommend: • Using rubber ended tools • Do not cross your tools across the battery terminals
  41. 41. • Never ground the wires, only connect them in series. In your gas-powered car your electric supply is grounded, but this is never the case with an electric car. ----- After you have connected the series, you need to hook up your remaining wires (the ones you marked earlier for easy identification.) If you are in doubt with any of the wiring, seek help from a competent mechanical friend or automotive electrician. There is always a real danger when dealing with high voltages of electricity, so please be careful.
  42. 42. Chapter 8 Final checks to make & steps to take • Check that the throttle connections are working properly. If it’s not connected properly an error message will show. If it is set properly there is about 150 ohms of resistance necessary to control the throttle. • You can not have your foot on the gas pedal when you are starting the vehicle or the controller interface will not open properly. (This is a safety feature that prevents the vehicle from moving the instant it is turned on.) • Check total voltage and the manual disconnect is set properly. • Check all the fuses for correct installation. • Use an e-meter to monitor the on board electrical and charging system. The e-meter will tell you the voltage and amps being used. • The light bulb test - The whole idea of this test is that if there is a short in the system, the light bulb will take the current and not your motor. You need to wire a 100-watt light bulb to the positive lead of the batteries in line with the circuit. Take an extension cord and wire a light socket in it. The light should only turn on briefly and then go out. If it stays on then there is a problem that you have to fix, which is most likely a short in your wiring.
  43. 43. • Connect your final battery leads. Use gloves for this connection, as there will be a spark when the capacitors in the DC converter get charged up. (Example) Under the hood of an electric car. Congratulations it’s time to drive! A few things to remember when driving an electric vehicle: • When the car is stopped the power steering pump is not running. Easing on the power (‘gas’ pedal) will get it turning easily. • If you are stopped and need to turn the wheel just push in the clutch, which disengages the transmission, and slowly press the power pedal and make your turn.
  44. 44. ----- Final tips to keep the cost of your conversion low: • Make sure you look for free and cheap parts from the sources mentioned in the manual. • Consider purchasing other parts & supplies second hand. • Sell the unneeded parts (such as gas motor & gas tank) you removed from your vehicle to your local car scrapping/wrecking place, or you could place an ad in your local paper, or list the parts on ebay. -----
  45. 45. Chapter 9 Helpful Resources: If you are seeking some assistance in converting your vehicle to electric or want to learn more about electric vehicles, you could join or ask for help from an Electric Vehicle Association. Generally the members of Electric Vehicle Associations are happy to help others, learn from each other, and advance the development of electric vehicles. ----- Please note that Electricity4Gas has no direct contact with the Electric Vehicle Associations listed. They have made no endorsement of Electricity4Gas. ------ Links to various Electric Vehicle Associations are below: Australia Australian Electric Vehicle Assocation inc http://www.aeva.asn.au/ Asia Pacific Electric Vehicle Association of Asia Pacific http://www.evaap.org/ Europe Electric Auto Association Europe http://www.eaaeurope.org/
  46. 46. UK The Battery Vehicle Society http://www.batteryvehiclesociety.org.uk Electric Auto Association – Arguably the biggest electric vehicle association in the world. http://www.eaaev.org/ Below are a list of Electric Auto Association chapters, split up into countries and states & provinces. (Thanks to http://www.eaaev.org/eaachapters.html for this list) Canada Electric Vehicle Council of Ottawa Web Site: evco.ca Contact: Alan Poulsen <info@evco.ca>, (613) 271-0940 Mailing: P.O. Box 4044, Ottawa, ON K1S5B1 Meetings: 7:30pm-10pm, last Monday of the Month Location: The Green Room in the Canada Science and Technology Museum, 1867 St. Laurent Blvd, Ottawa, 1867 St.Laurent, Ottawa ON Please check with guard for room location Vancouver Electric Vehicle Association Web Site: veva.bc.ca Contact: Haakon MacCallum <info@veva.bc.ca>, (604) 527- 4288 Mailing: 4053 West 32nd Avenue, Vancouver BC V65 1Z5 Meetings: 7:30pm, 3rd Wednesday of the month (Please check web site for details) Location:BCIT Electrical SE1 Bldg. Cafeteria — see map on
  47. 47. web site. All are welcome to join us beforehand (6pm - 6:30) at The White Spot Restaurant, 4129 Lougheed Hwy, Burnaby, BC (North-East corner of Lougheed Hwy & Gilmore, 1st traffic light East of Boundary & Lougheed). Germany EAA Deutschland Web Site: eaa-deutschland.org Contact: Ruediger Hild <ruediger.hild@gmx.de>, 0049-6136- 7520540 Mailing: Forststr. 18, 66538 Neunkirchen/Saarland/Deutschland Meetings: Please contact us for meeting times and locations USA Alaska Alaska EAA Web Site: alaskaEVA.org Contact: Mike Willmon <electrabishi@ak.net>, (907) 868-5710 Mailing: Attn Mike Willmon, 2550 Denali Suite 1, Anchorage, AK 99503 Meetings: 8pm - 9pm, 3rd Friday of the month Location: Kaladi Brothers, Brayton Drive, Anchorage, AK 99503 Arizona Borderland Electric Vehicle Association Contact: Donna Austin<donnagaustin@mindspring.com>, (520) 432-5151 Mailing: P.O Box 1222, Bisbee, AZ 85603 Meetings: First meeting 5:30pm July 11th
  48. 48. Location: Copper Queen Library,6 Main Street, Bisbee, Arizona 85603 Flagstaff EAA Web Site: flagstaffeaa.org/index.html Contact: Barkley Coggin <president@flagstaffeaa.org>, (928) 637-4444 Mailing: 6215 Rinker Circle, Flagstaff, AZ 86004 Meetings: 4pm - 6pm, 1st Sunday of the month Location: American Legion Hall on Birch and Humphries Streets, Flagstaff, AZ Phoenix EAA Web Site: phoenixeaa.com Contact: Jim Stack <jstackeaa@yahoo.com>, (480) 659-5513 Mailing: Attn. Sam DiMarco, 1070 E. Jupiter Place, Chandler, AZ 85225 Meetings: 9am, 4th Saturday of the month Location: Please see web site for location Tucson EVA2 Web Site: teva2.com Contact: Rush Dougherty <Info@teva2.org>, (520) 240-7493 Mailing: Rush Dougherty, 12800 W Big Valley St, Tucson AZ, 85736 Meetings: 9am, 3rd Saturday of the month Location: Room E, UMC, 1501 N Campbell Av, Tucson AZ, 85724 California Central Coast EAA Web Site: eaacc.org Contact: Will Beckett <will@becketts.ws>, (831) 688-8669
  49. 49. Mailing: 323 Los Altos Drive, Aptos, CA 95003 Meetings: Call or see web site for meeting information. Location: Calvary Church, 8065 Valencia Street, Aptos, CA 95003 Chico EAA Web Site: geocities.com/chicoeaa Contact: Chuck Alldrin <chicoeaa@gmail.com>, (530) 899- 1835 Mailing: 39 Lakewood Way, Chico, CA 95926 Meetings: 11am to 1pm, 2nd Saturday of the month Location: York Publishing/Videomaker 1350 E. 9th, Chico, CA 95926 , one block west of 99E, corner of Bartlet & 9th St. East (SF) Bay EAA Web Site: ebeaa.org Contact: Ed Thorpe <EAA-contact@excite.com>, (510) 864- 0662 Mailing: 2 Smith Ct, Alameda, CA 94502-7786 Meetings: 10am-12noon, 4th Saturday of the month Location: Alameda First Baptist Church, 1515 Santa Clara Avenue, Alameda, CA EVA of Southern California Contact: Leo Galcher <leo4marg@mac.com>, (949) 492-8115 Mailing: 35 Maracay, San Clemente, CA 92672 Meetings: 10am, 3rd Saturday of the month Location: Air Quality Management District(AQMD), 21865 Copley Drive, Diamond Bar, CA (off Hwy 60 and Hwy 57) Greater Sacramento EAA Contact: Tim Hastrup <tim.hastrup@surewest.net>, (916) 791- 1902 Mailing: 8392 West Granite Drive, Granite Bay, CA 95746 Meetings: 12noon, 3rd Tuesday of February, May, August, and
  50. 50. November Location: Cool River Pizza, 6200 Stanford Ranch Road, Rocklin, CA 95677 Konocti EAA Web Site: konoctieaa.org Contact: Dr. Randy Sun <rsun@mchsi.com>, (707) 263-3030 Mailing: 800 S. Main Street, Lakeport, CA 95453 Meetings: 11am, last Friday of the month Location: Sun Dental, 800 S Main Street, Lakeport, CA (Please see our web site under Future Meetings for Up-to-date meeting time and location.) North (SF) Bay EAA Web Site: nbeaa.org Contact: Chris Jones <chris_b_jones@prodigy.net>, (707) 577- 2391 (weekdays) Mailing: c/o Agilent Technologies, 1400 Fountaingrove Parkway, mailstop 3LSV, Santa Rosa, CA 95403 Meetings: Typically 10am to 12noon, 2nd Saturday of the month, check web site for details Location: Please check web site for details EVA of San Diego Web Site: evaosd.com Contact: Bill Hammons <ncsdca@att.net>, (858) 268-1759 Mailing: 1638 Minden Drive, San Diego, CA 92111 Meetings: 7pm, 4th Tuesday of the month Location: Regional Transportation Center, corner of El Cajon & I-15,, in the "Autotorium", San Diego CA San Francisco Electric Vehicle Association Web Site: sfeva.org Contact: Dale Miller <dalewmiller@gmail.com>, (415) 491- 0910
  51. 51. Mailing: 87 Mt. Tallac Ct., San Rafael, CA 94903 Meetings: 11am to 1pm, 1st Saturday of the month Location: Luscious Garage, 459 Clementina Street, San Francisco, CA San Francisco Peninsula EAA Contact: Bill Carroll <billceaa@yahoo.com>, (650) 589-2491 Mailing: 160 Ramona Avenue, South San Francisco, CA 94080- 5936 Meetings: 10am, 1st Saturday of the month Location: San Bruno Library, 701 Angus Avenue, San Bruno, CA San Jose EAA Web Site: geocities.com/sjeaa Contact: Terry Wilson <historian@eaaev.org>, (408) 446-9357 Mailing: SJEAA, 20157 Las Ondas San Jose CA 95014 Meetings: 10am, 2nd Saturday of the month Location: Reid Hillview Airport -- 2500 Cunningham Rd. San Jose, Ca. Silicon Valley EAA Web Site: eaasv.org Contact: Jerry Pohorsky <JerryP819@aol.com>, (408) 464- 0711 Mailing: 1691 Berna Street, Santa Clara, CA 95050 Meetings: 3rd Saturday (Jan-Nov) mostly held at HP Palo Alto CA level A Location: Bldg 20a Auditorium, Hewlett-Packard, 3000 Hanover St Palo Alto CA Ventura County EAA Web Site: geocities.com/vceaa Contact: Bruce Tucker <tuckerb2@adelphia.net>, (805) 495- 1026
  52. 52. Mailing: 283 Bethany Court, Thousand Oaks, CA 91360-2013 Meetings: Please contact Bruce for time and location Florida Florida EAA Web Site: floridaeaa.org Contact: Shawn Waggoner <shawn@suncoast.net>, (561) 543- 9223 Mailing: 8343 Blue Cypress, Lake Worth, FL 33467 Meetings: 9:30am, 2nd Saturday of the month Location: Coastal Tire and Auto, 35 SW 1st Avenue, Boca Raton, FL Georgia EV Club of the South Web Site: evclubsouth.org Contact: David Kennington<d_kennington@bellsouth.net>, (770) 944-3066 Mailing: 897 Woodman Trail, Austell, GA 30168 Meetings: 6pm, 1st Wednesday of the month Location: please check our web site Calendar for locations. Idaho Panhandle Electric Vehicle Association Contact: Gordy Ormesher <EVCarClub@hotmail.com>, (208) 660-8539 Mailing: 2025 E. Foxborough Court, Hayden, ID 83835 Meetings: 6:30pm, 2nd Monday of the month Location: Go Green Electric, Post Falls, ID
  53. 53. Illinois Fox Valley EAA Web Site: fveaa.org Contact: Ted Lowe <ted.lowe@fveaa.org>, (630) 260-0424 Mailing: P.O. Box 214, Wheaton, IL 60189-0214 Meetings: 6:30pm, 3rd Friday of the month Location: Packer Engineering, 1976 N Washington St, Naperville, IL 60563 Kansas See Mid America EAA Kansas City, MO Massachusetts New England EAA Web Site: neeaa.org/ Contact: Bob Rice <bobrice@snet.net>, (203) 530-4942 Mailing: 29 Lovers Lane, Killingworth, CT 06419 Meetings: 2pm-5pm, 2nd Saturday of the month Location: Please contact us for location Pioneer Valley EAA Web Site: pveaa.org Contact: Karen Jones <PVEAA@comcast.com> Mailing: P O box 153, Amherst, MA 01004-0153 Meetings: 2pm, 3rd Saturday of the month (Jan - June; Sept - Nov) Location: Please contact us for location Michigan
  54. 54. Michigan EAA Coming Web Site: michiganEAA.org Contact: Larry Tuttle <larrytuttle@gmail.com>, (734) 995-9904 Mailing: 1620 Baldwin Ave, Ann Arbor, MI 48104 Meetings: Please contact us for meeting information Minnesota Minnesota EAA Web Site: mneaaev.wikidot.com Contact: Craig Mueller <president@mn.eaaev.org>, (612) 414- 1736 Mailing: 4000 Overlook Drive, Bloomington, MN 55437 Meetings: 7pm to 8:30pm, Last Thursday of each month, CDT Location: Location changes, please check web site for details Missouri Mid America EAA Web Site: maeaa.org Contact: Mike Chancey <eaa@maeaa.org>, (816) 822-8079 Mailing: 1700 East 80th Street, Kansas City, MO 64131-2361 Meetings: 1:30pm, 2nd Saturday of the month Location: Location changes, please check web site for details Gateway Electric Vehicle Web Site: gatewayev.org Contact: George Moellenhoff <nowev@sbcglobal.net>, (314) 963-1358 Mailing: 741 Eckrich Place, St. Louis, MO 63119 Meetings: Monthly, Please contact us for for details Nevada
  55. 55. Alternative Transportation Club, EAA Web Site: electricnevada.org Contact: Bob Tregilus <lakeport104@yahoo.com>, (775) 826- 4514 Mailing: 2805 W. Pinenut Ct, Reno, NV 89509 Meetings: 6pm, Monthly, see web site or call for details Location: Northwest Reno Library, 2325 Robb Drive, Reno, NV Las Vegas Electric Vehicle Association Web Site: lveva.org Contact: William Kuehl <bill2k2000@yahoo.com>, (702) 636- 0304 Mailing: 2816 El Campo Grande Avenue, North Las Vegas, NV 89031-1176 Meetings: 10am to 12noon, 3rd Saturday of the month Location: Clark County Library, 1401 E. Flamingo Rd, Las Vegas, NV New York Long Island Electric Auto Association Web Site: lieaa.org/home Contact: Michael Anzalone <MJA@lieaa.org>, (631) 944-1104 Mailing: 18 Garwood Street, Centereach, NY 11720 Meetings: 6pm, 1st Wednesday of the month Location: Lupton Hall at SUNY Farmingdale, Farmingdale,NY North Carolina Coastal Carolinas Wilmington Contact: Page Paterson <pagepaterson@mac.com>, (910) 686- 9129
  56. 56. Mailing: 1317 Middle Sound, Wilmington, NC 28411 Meetings: Please contact us for time and date Piedmont Carolina Electric Vehicle Association Web Site: opecthis.info Contact: Clifford Metcalf <cliffordm2458@yahoo.com >, (704) 624-3397 Mailing: 1021 Timber Wood Ct, Matthews, NC 28105 Meetings: Please contact us for time and date Location: Charlotte Energy Solutions, 337 Baldwin Avenue, Charlotte, NC Electric Cars of Roanoke Valley Contact: Harold Miller <EV@schoollink.net>, (252) 534-1258 Mailing: 567 Miller Trail Jackson NC 27845 Meetings: Please contact us for time and date Location: Economic Development Building in Jackson, NC Triad Electric Vehicle Association Web Site: localaction.biz/TEVA Contact: Jack Martin <jmartin@hotsheet.com>, (336) 213-5225 Mailing: 2053 Willow Spring Lane, Burlington, NC 27215 Meetings: 9am, 1st Saturday of the month Location: T.S. Designs, 2053 Willow Spring Lane, Burlington, NC Triangle EAA Web Site: rtpnet.org/teaa Contact: Peter Eckhoff <teaa@rtpnet.org>, (919) 477-9697 Mailing: 9 Sedley Place, Durham, NC 27705-2191 Meetings: 3rd Saturday of the month Location: Advanced Energy, 909 Capability Drive, Raleigh, NC Oregon
  57. 57. Oregon Electric Vehicle Association Web Site: oeva.org Contact: Rick Barnes <barnes.rick@verizon.net>, Mailing: 19100 SW Vista Street, Aloha, OR 97006 Meetings: 7:30pm, 2nd Thursday of the month Location:PCG Building, Two World Trace Center, SW corner of 1st and Salmon, Portland Pennsylvania Eastern Electric Vehicle Club Web Site: eevc.info Contact: Peter G. Cleaveland <easternev@aol.com>, (610) 828- 7630 Mailing: P.O. Box 134, Valley Forge, PA 19482-0134 Meetings: 7:00 p.m. 2nd Wednesday of the month Location: Room 35, Plymouth-Whitemarsh High School, 201 E. Germantown Pike, Plymouth Meeting, PA Three Rivers EVA Web Site: threeriverseva.org Contact: Jonathan Belak <jbelak@paelectrics.com>, (724) 387- 8210 Mailing: 5847 Washington Avenue, Export, PA 15632-1331 Meetings: 10:00 a.m. 3rd Saturday of the month Location: PA Electrics, 5847 Washington Avenue, Export, PA Texas Alamo City EAA Web Site: aceaa.org Contact: Alfonzo Ranjel <acranjel@sbcglobal.net>, (210) 389- 2339
  58. 58. Mailing: 9211 Autumn Branches, San Antonio TX 78254 Meetings: 3:00 p.m. 3rd Sunday of January, March, May, June, July, August and October Location: Please subscribe to mail list at ACEAA.ORG for latest update. AustinEV: the Austin Area EAA Web Site: austinev.org Contact: Aaron Choate <austinev-info@austinev.org>, (512) 524-7159 Mailing: PO Box 49153, Austin, TX 78765 Meetings: Please see our web site Houston EAA Web Site: heaa.org Contact: Dale Brooks <brooksdale@usa.net>, (713) 218-6785 Mailing: 8541 Hatton Street, Houston, TX 77025-3807 Meetings: 6:30pm, 3rd Thursday of the month Location: Room 280, 2nd Floor, The Citizen Environmental Center, 3015 Richmond Avenue, Houston, TX North Texas EAA Web: http://nteaa.org/ Contact: John L. Brecher <jlbrecher@verizon.net>, (214) 703- 5975 Mailing: 1128 Rock Creek Drive, Garland, TX 75040 Meetings: 2nd Saturday of the month Location: Time and Place for the upcoming meeting is posted at the NTEAA Yahoo Group Utah
  59. 59. Utah EV Coalition Web Site: saltflats.com. Utah Salt Flats Racing Association meeting (USFRA); we are the Official Bonneville Salt Flats AF Racing Events Coordinators. Contact: Kent Singleton <kent@saltflats.com>, (801) 644-0903 Mailing: 325 E. 2550 N #83, North Ogden, UT 84414 Meetings: 7pm, 1st Wednesday of the month Location: Totems Restaurant, 538 S. Redwood Rd, Salt Lake City, UT, (801) 975-0401. You'll meet BYU Electric Team, WSU-EV Design Team other land speed racing celebrities. Always a great turn out. Washington Seattle Electric Vehicle Association Web Site: seattleeva.org Contact: Steven S. Lough <stevenslough@comcast.net>, (206) 524-1351 Mailing: 6021 32nd. Ave. NE, Seattle, WA 98115-7230 Meetings: 7pm, 2nd Tuesday of the month Location: 4310 Thackary Place, Seattle, WA Please see our web site for details Washington D.C. EVA of Washington DC Web Site: evadc.org Contact: David Goldstein <goldie.ev1@juno.com>, (301) 869- 4954 Mailing: 9140 Centerway Rd, Gaitherburg, MD 20879-1882 Meetings: 7pm, 2nd or 3rd Tuesday of the month Location: National Institute of Health, building 31-C, 6th Floor Bethesda MD Please check our web site for current information
  60. 60. Wisconsin Southern Wisconsin EV Proliferation Web Site: emissionsfreecars.com Contact: Mike Turner <mike.turner@emissionsfreecars.com>, (920) 261-7057 Mailing: 808 Fieldcrest Ct, Watertown, WI 53511 Meetings: Please contact us for date and location
  61. 61. Chapter 10 My Home-Made Renewable Solar & Wind Energy Recommendation How to power your electric car for free, and slash your home electricity bill by 80% or even eliminate it completely! I wanted to share my experience in purchasing a product that many other people recommended: GreenDiyEnergy. I've been researching for many ways to generate renewable energy from your home. It can be done. But until very recently this was very, very expensive. Luckily, the team at GreenDiyEnergy figured out a way to build a solar or wind generator for $200 or even $100. I don't personally know the creators of GreenDiyEnergy, and I was a little skeptical at first when I saw the website. However, seeing that they provided a 60-day money-back guarantee, I decided to give it a fair trial. And I was very pleasantly surprized by the whole experience with their product. It taught me how to easily build a solar or wind generator. And although I know how to build an electric car, I've never had experience building a renewable energy resource for my home. The book has specific details on where to get every piece and instructions on how to put everything together. After about 6 hours spent on it and $170 invested, I had my own solar panel.
  62. 62. After another 5 hours spent and $120, I had my own wind mill generator. I just had to try both these systems. And I had a lot of fun while building them. Is "Home Made Energy" The Best Solution For The Energy Problems We Are Facing? I would say a big YES! Otherwise I wouldn't even bother to write about this. You can buy a wind or solar generator and pay someone to install it. But from my research this will cost you at least a couple thousands dollars. And the DIY products from GreenDiyEnergy will generate all the electricity you need. To me it was like buying "free gold". I save more on my monthly bill than I invested in the whole system. This small thing that I've done for my home will save me this year thousands of dollars. Plus, I have learned a lot from the GreenDiyEnergy guide. Everything is explained very straight forward and it contains information that you need to know. Otherwise you can rely on someone else. And you probably know how costly and frustrating this can be some times... So, if you consume any electricity at all, this product is for you. I mean, you can even take your generators to family picnics. Yes, that means portable electricity!
  63. 63. If you want to save money on your electricity bill, be energy independent, and help our environment, then click the website link below to find out more about GreenDiyEnergy. http://www.electricity4gas.com/greendiyenergy.html
  64. 64. From all of us at Electricity4Gas.com, thankyou for doing your part to help the environment. Enjoy driving your electric car and enjoy all the money you will save, never again paying for gas! © Electricity4Gas.com No Part of this document shall be reproduced or resold without permission from an authorised representative at Electricity4Gas.com We reserve the right to prosecute and seek damages from an individual or company that violates this, under 17 U.S.C. § 506(a) and 18 U.S.C. § 2319.

×