Algerian Youth Leadership Program - 2014

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Algerian Youth Leadership Program - 2014

  1. 1. DAY 1
  2. 2. HELLO!Welcome to the University of Nevada and the Reynolds School Leadership & Strategic Social Media Prof. Todd Felts & Dr. Kathy Geller
  3. 3. Your Teams & Global Ambassadors: KATIE NICOLE Team ELKO Nevada Museum of Art RYAN Team FALLON Volunteers of America ANNIE Team TONOPAH The Children’s Cabinet BROOKE Team YERINGTON Big Brother/Big Sister
  4. 4. LEADERSHIP
  5. 5. The Leadership Challenge Some people make things happen, Some people watch things happen, While others wonder “what just happened?” Gaelic Proverb
  6. 6. Leadership Session 1: Leadership is the process of influencing others toward common goals. Session 2: Leadership requires you to ask questions and listen with an open mind and open heart to the answers. Session 3: A story is something that comes from outside, but the meaning is something that emerges from within. The leader as storyteller. Session 4: Leadership is about you and what you do!
  7. 7. STRATEGIC SOCIAL MEDIA
  8. 8. witter # or @ # = category pointing to issue @ = address pointing to person
  9. 9. Today • Clarify the definition of using social media strategically. • Recognize opportunities for using video and determine your role in influencing others and the outcome • Experience the value of Twitter in successfully engaging an audience.
  10. 10. Audience: • Is a small group of people that you need to help improve the organization. • The audience is usually just few people. It is made up of a small group of people who have something in common and talk about the same things.
  11. 11. Your Message: • A message is a short phrase that you want people to remember. • A message asks the audience to take action – volunteer, give money, or simply show up. • It is repeated several times and it a way that creates emotion and excitement with your audience.
  12. 12. The Big Questions? 1. What can we do to move others up the pyramid? 1. How can we move ourselves up the pyramid? Leaders live here!
  13. 13. The Online Story Change, Conflict and or Superhero REAL WORLD NEW WORLD The request!
  14. 14. The Online Story Change, Conflict and or Superhero REAL WORLD NEW WORLD The request!
  15. 15. There are many ways to tell stories online and accomplish a goal. • Ask a question on Twitter. • Follow people @. Follow things #. • Share bit by bit. Bit.ly • Comment on others. • Join a conversation. Interact with @ and #. • Change your words. Make it about the solution and not the problem.
  16. 16. Find your group and Global Ambassador. KATIE NICOLE Team ELKO Nevada Museum of Art RYAN Team FALLON Volunteers of America ANNIE Team TONOPAH The Children’s Cabinet BROOKE Team YERINGTON Big Brother/Big Sister
  17. 17. Just for fun. WHO WILL BE FIRST? FIND THE CURRENT WEATHER IN THE ASSIGNED CITY: You are asking @someone or following #something. NO MORE THAN 3 tweets though. You can do it, if you plan. 1. Elko: Lima, Peru 2. Yerington: Port Elizabeth, South Africa 3. Fallon: Bangkok, Thailand 4. Tonopah: Prague, Czech Republic
  18. 18. 1. Find your group and Global Ambassador. – Elko: Museum of Art - @nevadaart • The goal is to get people who have been to the original Shangra La in Hawaii to tweet specifics about the campus. You need to begin by researching the issue. You will use your group leader’s Twitter account. – Yerington: Big Brother Big Sister @BBBSNN • The goal is to get someone who had either a big brother or big sister to tweet his or her experience. You need to begin by researching the issue. You will use your group leader’s Twitter account. – Fallon: Volunteers of America @VOASAC • The goal is to remind people that Voasac also includes Northern Nevada while increasing the number of followers in Reno on the VOASAC Twitter page. You need to begin by researching the issue. You will use your group leader’s Twitter account. – Tonopah: Children’s Cabinet @TheChildrensCab • The goal is to get 35 new followers. You need to begin by researching the issue. You will use your group leader’s Twitter account.
  19. 19. LEADERSHIP Dr. Kathy Geller
  20. 20. Leadership is . . . • The process of influencing people with ideas • Shared, there is no limit to the number of leaders in a group • An act that fosters initiative, creativity, and responsibility • Evidenced in relationship with others • Situational, it requires different approaches at different times • Authentic, it requires knowing oneself and honoring others.
  21. 21. Leadership Session 1: Leadership is the process of influencing others toward common goals. Session 2: Leadership requires you to ask questions and listen with an open mind and open heart to the answers. Session 3: A story is something that comes from outside, but the meaning is something that emerges from within. The leader as storyteller. Session 4: Leadership is about you and what you do!
  22. 22. Leadership Defined An individual is a leader in any social situation in which his or her ideas and actions influence the thought and behavior of others.
  23. 23. When have you been a leader?
  24. 24. Goals for Today • Recognize opportunities for leadership and determine your role in influencing others and the outcome • Experience the value of collaboration in successfully accomplishing a complex project
  25. 25. Team Machine • To recognize the value of a planned outcome. • To work effectively through confusion and chaos. • To draw on the strengths of the immediate team. • To stay in touch with other groups who are doing similar but seemingly unrelated tasks. • To ask for what you need. • To share information for the greater good.
  26. 26. Team Machine • An activity to experience leadership in small groups within a larger organization • Goals of the activity: To have fun and learn! – Slowest running machine – Fastest reset time • Five sub-groups – 50 minutes (design & build) Two consecutive successful test runs to be certified (by Kathy) • Five components come together to become the “team machine” – 15 minutes (design & build) • TEAM MACHINE!
  27. 27. Working at a distance • Information will come to you during the activity; you may want to send information to other teams as well. • Training is under design and will be rolled out when it becomes available. • Your goal during the first part of the activity is to design and build your component. That said, you can “visit” other teams during this part of the activity to learn about their function and to determine your relationship.
  28. 28. The Leadership Challenge Some people make things happen, Some people watch things happen, While others wonder “what just happened?” Gaelic Proverb
  29. 29. Team Machine • What did your team do that supported its success? • What were the team’s challenges? • Who assumed roles of influence in your group? • What did you learn about leading and groups?
  30. 30. Leadership in Groups • Groups have the unique ability to recognize, define and solve shared problems by working together. • Action is taken through the participation of all members each contributing according to his or her strengths and personal style. • Outcomes are met through a combination of individual efforts and team efforts. • Leading is shared, with different people stepping up to respond to various needs. • Each group member has both the freedom to contribute and the responsibility for success. • Those in a position of formal leadership recognize that their primary role is that of facilitating group process. Leadership and Dynamic Group Action, 1962
  31. 31. Leadership is performance art • It requires practice and discipline • We learn from each “performance” and take actions to improve it the next time • In the moment we may need to IMPROVISE to make it work • We are both actor and director: – Actors: What is my objective? What is the motivation for this character? How can I authentically connect with the audience? What will inspire them? – Directors: How do I orchestrate the environment? How do I foster engagement? How do I support others ing stepping-up?
  32. 32. DAY 2
  33. 33. Welcome Back Welcome to the University of Nevada and the Reynolds School Leadership & Strategic Social Media Prof. Todd Felts & Dr. Kathy Geller
  34. 34. LEADERSHIPDay 2
  35. 35. Leadership is . . . • The process of influencing people with ideas • Shared; there is no limit to the number of leaders in a group • The act of leadership fosters initiative, creativity, and responsibility • Evidenced in relationship with others • Situational, it requires different approaches at different times • Enhanced by seeking outside information
  36. 36. Today • Recognize effective listening requires us to listen with a suspension of judgment • Learn to use questions to allow for new understanding • Experience the value of the big question
  37. 37. What do you see?
  38. 38. Our “mindset” frames how we see the world • Programs what we see and experience • Determines how we observe, understand, accept others and ourselves • Becomes the basis for “what we know” and “how we react”
  39. 39. The range of what we think and do is limited by what we fail to notice. And because we fail to notice that we fail to notice, there is little we can do to change; until we notice how failing to notice shapes our thoughts and deeds. R. Laing
  40. 40. Questions • Authentic inquiry • Open-ended questions What – How – When - Where • The challenge of “why” questions • When are closed questions important
  41. 41. Listening with Empathy • Empathic listening seeks to understand another person’s frame of reference. You see the world as they see it, you understand their “ladder” and how they feel. • It requires you to suspend your judgment • In empathic listening you listen with your ears; you listen with your eyes, and your listen with your heart. . .
  42. 42. How do we listen? • Listen with the intent to understand the other person, not as we want them to be, but as they are. • “We have two ears and one mouth, so that we can listen twice as much as we speak.” Epictetus, (Stoics) 55 – 135 A.D.
  43. 43. Table Groups • If you were going to interview another member of AYLP, what questions would allow you to truly learn about the life of this other person? • Each group creates five questions that in conversation will allow you to better know one of your new friends or acquaintances. • Find a partner from another table group and have a conversation based on the five questions you each bring with you.
  44. 44. Paired Conversation Debrief • What did you learn from this process of “asking questions” • What was easy? • What was a challenge?
  45. 45. Can we change the world through better conversation? We don't have many opportunities today to develop relationships with people of different backgrounds who may hold different viewpoints. When we have those opportunities, we are able to see beyond our differences to discover what we have more deeply in common. By having conversations around life's "Big Questions," we may be able to create understanding among people in our communities, and around the world. "Big Questions" are concerned with the topics that should matter to all of us, regardless of our religious traditions, cultural heritage, ethnicity, gender, and beliefs. Through these conversations, we can understand each other, understand ourselves, and make the world a better place.
  46. 46. Ask the Big Questions • Video link
  47. 47. Ask big questions • Big Questions rely on wisdom and experience. They lead to conversations. Big Questions are questions that matter to everyone and that everyone can answer. Big questions ask about – The meaning of life – The value of relationships – Our pupose in the world – The community that surrounds us Their exploration leads to conversations that may transform the way we experience the world.
  48. 48. Here are some “big questions” • What does the world need from you? • What will be your legacy? • What have you learned so far? • What do you need to learn? • For whom are we responsible? • How does technology change us? • What do we assume? • What do we choose to ignore • When are you satisfied? • What does winning mean to you? • When do you take stand?
  49. 49. Questions for the Journalism students • Questions for the Journalism students
  50. 50. What “big” questions will you want to ask people in your Organizations • Purpose • History • Relationships • Community
  51. 51. Communication Break
  52. 52. DAY 3
  53. 53. Welcome Back Welcome to the University of Nevada and the Reynolds School Leadership & Strategic Social Media Prof. Todd Felts & Dr. Kathy Geller
  54. 54. LEADERSHIPDay 2
  55. 55. Today • Story telling, the leader’s “art” • Experience the value of story-telling
  56. 56. Story-Telling • The basis of communication before it was written • Everyone likes to listen to stories • They are visual, auditory and action based • Stories are contagious • They provide information that is easier to remember • They inspire! • Stories give people the freedom to come to their own conclusions
  57. 57. Telling a story . . . • What is the goal for telling this story? • Section 1: Context – the real world – When and where? – Who is the Subject? – What does the main subject want? – What is the obstacle? • Section 2: Action – the challenge – What happens to the subject (hero)? – What setbacks are experienced? – What conclusions can the subject draw? • Section 3: Result – the new world – What is the outcome for the subject? – What was the “lesson learned” (moral of the story)? – What is the “take-away” for the listener? (link back!)
  58. 58. The Story One day a farmer's donkey fell down into a well that the farmer had accidentally left uncovered. The animal cried piteously for hours as the farmer tried to figure out what to do. Finally, he decided the animal was old, and the well needed to be covered up anyway, so it just wasn't worth it to retrieve the donkey. He invited all his neighbors to come over and help him. They all grabbed a shovel and began to shovel dirt into the well. At first, the donkey realized what was happening and cried horribly. Then, to everyone's amazement he quieted down. A few shovel loads later, the farmer finally looked down the well. He was astonished at what he saw. With each shovel of dirt that hit his back, the donkey was doing something amazing. He would shake it off and take a step up. As the farmer's neighbors continued to shovel dirt on top of the animal, he would shake it off and take a step up. Pretty soon, everyone was amazed as the donkey stepped up over the edge of the well and happily trotted off!
  59. 59. The Lesson . . . There are moments in Life where each of us may fall down a well. And there may be many people ready to shovel dirt - all kinds of dirt. The trick to getting out of the well is to shake it off and take a step up. Each of our troubles is a stepping stone. We can get out of the deepest wells just by not stopping, never giving up! Shake it off and take a step up.
  60. 60. How the story really ended. . . Now, most people think that's the end, but it isn't. The donkey later came back and bit the farmer who had tried to bury him. The gash from the bite got infected, and the farmer eventually died from septic shock. When you do something wrong and try to cover your ass, it always comes back to bite you!
  61. 61. Telling a story . . . • What is the goal for telling this story? • Section 1: Context – the real world – When and where? – Who is the Subject? – What does the main subject want? – What is the obstacle? • Section 2: Action – the challenge – What happens to the subject (hero)? – What setbacks are experienced? – What conclusions can the subject draw? • Section 3: Result – the new world – What is the outcome for the subject? – What was the “lesson learned” (moral of the story)? – What is the “take-away” for the listener? (link back!)
  62. 62. The art of storytelling Engage your audience. Start your storytelling by interacting with your audience or doing something to grab their attention. Ask them a question, even if it's just rhetorical, that relates to the conclusion, twist, or context for the story you're going to tell. Alternatively you can make a grabbing statement that catches their attention (setting your hook, the equivalent of a click-bait headline). This forces their attention to focus on the idea of your story and makes them want to hear more.
  63. 63. The art of storytelling Build the scene. You want to tell your audience the story in a way that makes them feel like they're there. Start by setting context. Continue to create the scene by using details which help them picture the action and feel the things you felt. You'll also want to carefully tailor your language: use words which create very strong, very specific emotions.
  64. 64. The art of storytelling Focus on what's important. When telling the story, it is important to include details, to create that sense of immersion. It's very important to focus on what's important. Cut the details that aren't important for the story, leave the ones that make the story. As time allows, keep the details that go the furthest to set the scene, but adjust as necessary to meet the reactions of your audience. If they start to seem bored, speed it up and pare down to the necessities.
  65. 65. The art of storytelling Make it feel conclusive. It's awkward when an audience isn't sure if you're done or not so make the conclusion known. – Ask a question and give an answer. "How crazy is that? I know I'm sure not going to try that again.” – State the moral. "This, ladies and gentlemen, is an excellent example of why you should never take your cat to work.” – Use tone and voice carefully. Try generally building in volume and speed until the climax of the story, at which point you should slow back down and lower your voice to show that you're done.
  66. 66. Telling a story . . . In your community groups create a story about your agency’s mission and impact. – Engage your audience – Build the scene – Focus on what is important – Make it conclusive Each group is being provided a set of cards that you can use (to create a pictorial representation of your story). Be prepared to present your story to your colleagues . . .
  67. 67. DAY 3: Welcome to the University of Nevada and the Reynolds School A Plan in Pictures. Prof. Todd Felts & Dr. Kathy Geller
  68. 68. Your Teams & Global Ambassadors: KATIE NICOLE Team ELKO Nevada Museum of Art RYAN Team FALLON Volunteers of America ANNIE Team TONOPAH The Children’s Cabinet BROOKE Team YERINGTON Big Brother/Big Sister A B
  69. 69. Step 1: Research • What do we know about your organization? • Who does it serve? • Who is its target audience(s)? Be precise. – What do we want to tell them? – What do we want them to do? – Educate them? Change their behavior?
  70. 70. Step 2: Plan • Goal: To become ___________. (Big picture) • Objective. To tell a story about a person who benefited from (name of organization) and is shared on social media beginning June 30 until ___________. • Strategy: To get 200 people to share (name of person or several people) on Facebook and Twitter while ___________ (what else you want them to do). • Tactic: Produce a 30 second to 1 minute video and upload it to YouTube.
  71. 71. EWS – Extreme Wide Shot (Usually used as establishing shot). VWS – Very Wide Shot (The subject if visible (barely) but we still know where he is. WS – Wide Shot (The subject takes up the full frame, or at least some of it). MS – Mid Shot (Subject is clear but we have an idea of the whole subject). CU – Close Up. A certain feature takes up the whole frame. ECU – Extreme Close up – Shows extreme detail. CI - Cut In -- Shows some (other) part of the subject in detail. POV – Shows a view from the subjects perspective. Ending Shot – (May include credits.)
  72. 72. EWS – Extreme Wide Shot (Usually used as establishing shot). VWS – Very Wide Shot (The subject if visible (barely) but we still know where he is. WS – Wide Shot (The subject takes up the full frame, or at least some of it). MS – Mid Shot (Subject is clear but we have an idea of the whole subject). CU – Close Up. A certain feature takes up the whole frame. ECU – Extreme Close up – Shows extreme detail. CI - Cut In -- Shows some (other) part of the subject in detail. POV – Shows a view from the subjects perspective. Ending Shot – (May include credits.)
  73. 73. SHOTS EWS – Extreme Wide Shot (Usually used as establishing shot). VWS – Very Wide Shot (The subject if visible (barely) but we still know where he is.
  74. 74. SHOTS WS – Wide Shot (The subject takes up the full frame, or at least some of it). MS – Mid Shot (Subject is clear but we have an idea of the whole subject).
  75. 75. SHOTS CU – Close Up. A certain feature takes up the whole frame. ECU – Extreme Close up – Shows extreme detail.
  76. 76. CI - Cut In -- Shows some (other) part of the subject in detail. CA – Cutaway – A shot of something other than the subject.
  77. 77. POV – Shows a view from the subjects perspective. Ending Shot – (May include credits.)
  78. 78. STRATEGIC SOCIAL MEDIA
  79. 79. witter # or @ # = category pointing to issue @ = address pointing to person
  80. 80. Today • Clarify the definition of using social media strategically. • Recognize opportunities for using video and determine your role in influencing others and the outcome • Experience the value of Twitter in successfully engaging an audience.
  81. 81. Audience: • Is a small group of people that you need to help improve the organization. • The audience is usually just few people. It is made up of a small group of people who have something in common and talk about the same things.
  82. 82. Your Message: • A message is a short phrase that you want people to remember. • A message asks the audience to take action – volunteer, give money, or simply show up. • It is repeated several times and it a way that creates emotion and excitement with your audience.
  83. 83. The Big Questions? 1. What can we do to move others up the pyramid? 1. How can we move ourselves up the pyramid? Leaders live here!
  84. 84. The Online Story Change, Conflict and or Superhero REAL WORLD NEW WORLD The request!
  85. 85. The Online Story Change, Conflict and or Superhero REAL WORLD NEW WORLD The request!
  86. 86. There are many ways to tell stories online and accomplish a goal. • Ask a question on Twitter. • Follow people @. Follow things #. • Share bit by bit. Bit.ly • Comment on others. • Join a conversation. Interact with @ and #. • Change your words. Make it about the solution and not the problem.
  87. 87. Find your group and Global Ambassador. KATIE NICOLE Team ELKO Nevada Museum of Art RYAN Team FALLON Volunteers of America ANNIE Team TONOPAH The Children’s Cabinet BROOKE Team YERINGTON Big Brother/Big Sister
  88. 88. Just for fun. WHO WILL BE FIRST? FIND THE CURRENT WEATHER IN THE ASSIGNED CITY: You are asking @someone or following #something. NO MORE THAN 3 tweets though. You can do it, if you plan. 1. Elko: Lima, Peru 2. Yerington: Port Elizabeth, South Africa 3. Fallon: Bangkok, Thailand 4. Tonopah: Prague, Czech Republic
  89. 89. 1. Find your group and Global Ambassador. – Elko: Museum of Art - @nevadaart • The goal is to get people who have been to the original Shangra La in Hawaii to tweet specifics about the campus. You need to begin by researching the issue. You will use your group leader’s Twitter account. – Yerington: Big Brother Big Sister @BBBSNN • The goal is to get someone who had either a big brother or big sister to tweet his or her experience. You need to begin by researching the issue. You will use your group leader’s Twitter account. – Fallon: Volunteers of America @VOASAC • The goal is to remind people that Voasac also includes Northern Nevada while increasing the number of followers in Reno on the VOASAC Twitter page. You need to begin by researching the issue. You will use your group leader’s Twitter account. – Tonopah: Children’s Cabinet @TheChildrensCab • The goal is to get 35 new followers. You need to begin by researching the issue. You will use your group leader’s Twitter account.
  90. 90. DAY 4
  91. 91. Welcome Back Welcome to the University of Nevada and the Reynolds School Leadership & Strategic Social Media Prof. Todd Felts & Dr. Kathy Geller
  92. 92. LEADERSHIP
  93. 93. Today • Recognize that interacting with others requires awareness of the other in the context of the self • How will you apply what you have learned about leadership and strategic communication?
  94. 94. Leadership is about YOU! • Actions What do I do? (R-P-GID-E; YOU!) • Influences Who and what contributes to my choice of actions (Big questions, Audience) • Assumptions What do I assume that guides my decisions? (The LADDER) • Values What conscious and unconscious beliefs are the basis for my mental models? (Gorilla and Old Lady/ Young Lady)
  95. 95. Four Basic Styles Dove Peacock Owl Eagle How do we describe ourselves? What do we want you to know about us? What do we believe about you?
  96. 96. Style Preference Groups Ask- Indirect People Oriented-Open Tell – Direct Task Oriented- Boundaried Dove Peacock Owl Eagle
  97. 97. Behavioral Styles Summary RELATER (Dove) • Asks more than tells • Listens more than talks • Reserves opinion • Warm, steady delivery • Lower volume, slower speech • Dislikes interpersonal conflict • Seeks acceptance • Patient SOCIALIZER (Peacock) • Tells stories & anecdotes • Talks more than listens • Shares personal feelings • Fast animated delivery • High volume, quick speech • Takes spontaneous action • Seeks recognition • Creative THINKER (Owl) • Provides data/information • Listens more than talks • Shares on “need to know” •Lower volume, steady delivery •Slow to decision • Prefers analytic processes • Seeks perfection (right) • Structured DIRECTOR (Eagle) • Tells more than asks • Talks more than listens • Specific and to the point • Moderate volume, rapid pace • Quick to action • Prefers authority • Seeks to achieve • Productive
  98. 98. Behavioral Styles Strategies RELATER - DOVE 1. Talk warmly & informally 2. Explore their needs 3. Emphasize harmony, teamwork 4. Ask how they “feel” about your recommendations 5. Provide direction & assurance 6. Makes collaborative decisions SOCIALIZER- PEACOCK 1. Show enthusiasm 2. Explore their motivations 3. Balance information gathering w/ stories 4. Emphasize uniqueness & prestige 5. Provide testimonials & incentive 6. Makes spontaneous decisions THINKER - OWL 1. Appeal to their logic 2. Explore their expertise & objectives 3. Ask fact-oriented questions 4. Emphasize accuracy, quality, reliability 5. Provide documentation of options 6. Makes deliberate decisions DIRECTOR - EAGLE 1. Be prepared & organized 2. Explore desired results & constraints 3. Alternate questions w/ giving information 4. Emphasize results, efficiency 5. Provide a concise analysis of needs 6. Makes decisive decisions
  99. 99. What have you learned? How will you take it home? • Team machine – we are all connected • We are limited by our focus and assumptions • The importance of the “big questions” • Story-telling/story boarding is an important tool • Tactics to deliver the message • Project planning – “research, plan, get it done and evaluate” enhances success • Different strokes for different folks, “the birds”
  100. 100. DAY 4: Welcome to the University of Nevada and the Reynolds School Get it done! Prof. Todd Felts & Dr. Kathy Geller
  101. 101. Your Teams & Global Ambassadors: KATIE NICOLE Team ELKO Nevada Museum of Art RYAN Team FALLON Volunteers of America ANNIE Team TONOPAH The Children’s Cabinet BROOKE Team YERINGTON Big Brother/Big Sister A B
  102. 102. “I’M A GREAT SOCCER PLAYER.” MARKETING
  103. 103. “TRUST ME, HE’S A GREAT SOCCER PLAYER.” PUBLIC RELATIONS
  104. 104. “I’M A GREAT SOCCER PLAYER. I’M A GREAT SOCCER PLAYER. I’M A GREAT SOCCER PLAYER.” ADVERTISING
  105. 105. “CAN SOMEONE HELP ME FIND A GREAT SOCCER PLAYER?” SOCIAL MEDIA
  106. 106. “Is he a great soccer player? We’ll hear from dozens of witnesses and experts after these messages.” JOURNALISM
  107. 107. “I UNDERSTAND YOU’RE A GREAT SOCCER PLAYER.” BRANDING
  108. 108. Step 1: Research • What do we know about your organization? • Who does it serve? • Who is its target audience(s)? Be precise. – What do we want to tell them? – What do we want them to do? – Educate them? Change their behavior?
  109. 109. Step 2: Plan • Goal: To become ___________. (Big picture) • Objective. To tell a story about a person who benefited from (name of organization) and is shared on social media beginning June 30 until ___________. • Strategy: To get 200 people to share (name of person of several people) on Facebook and Twitter while ___________ (what else you want them to do). • Tactic: Produce a 30 second to 1 minute video and upload it to YouTube.
  110. 110. Step 3: Get it done! • The way you deliver your message requires you to: – Make sure the message is clear in all tactics. – Make sure the message is connected in all tactics. – Ensure there is a clear timeline on when things will happen. – To contact those people who will help your tactics work.
  111. 111. Step 4: Evaluate • How will you know your tactics work? • You may need to count. • What did you do to adjust your plan to ensure success?
  112. 112. TYPES OF TACTICS: • Billboard • Article in magazine • Advertisement • Event • Meeting • Sign • Give-away • T-shirt • Competition on Facebook
  113. 113. TODAY 1. Describe your audience. Where do they live? You may describe them by providing their age or other important information? What do you want them to do? 2. Have a 10 minute discussion about your video with your global ambassador. Make sure your video is targeting your audience. AND THEN: 3. Get in your groups and, A. Create 3 additional tactics supporting your video. You will describe them to the everyone. • How will you use the other 3 tactics to get 200 people to share your video? • Describe the people you will need to help accomplish your tactic. • Remember all tactics must support the GOAL you created on Monday. TO BECOME…….. B. Create a timeline for all 4 tactics. C. Create a way to evaluate all 4 tactics. (How will you know if they worked or not?) • It’s ok if you don’t reach your goal, but you must be able to explain why?
  114. 114. SHOTS EWS – Extreme Wide Shot (Usually used as establishing shot). VWS – Very Wide Shot (The subject if visible (barely) but we still know where he is.
  115. 115. SHOTS WS – Wide Shot (The subject takes up the full frame, or at least some of it). MS – Mid Shot (Subject is clear but we have an idea of the whole subject).
  116. 116. SHOTS CU – Close Up. A certain feature takes up the whole frame. ECU – Extreme Close up – Shows extreme detail.
  117. 117. CI - Cut In -- Shows some (other) part of the subject in detail. CA – Cutaway – A shot of something other than the subject.
  118. 118. POV – Shows a view from the subjects perspective. Ending Shot – (May include credits.)
  119. 119. STRATEGIC SOCIAL MEDIA
  120. 120. witter # or @ # = category pointing to issue @ = address pointing to person
  121. 121. Today • Clarify the definition of using social media strategically. • Recognize opportunities for using video and determine your role in influencing others and the outcome • Experience the value of Twitter in successfully engaging an audience.
  122. 122. Audience: • Is a small group of people that you need to help improve the organization. • The audience is usually just few people. It is made up of a small group of people who have something in common and talk about the same things.
  123. 123. Your Message: • A message is a short phrase that you want people to remember. • A message asks the audience to take action – volunteer, give money, or simply show up. • It is repeated several times and it a way that creates emotion and excitement with your audience.
  124. 124. The Big Questions? 1. What can we do to move others up the pyramid? 1. How can we move ourselves up the pyramid? Leaders live here!
  125. 125. The Online Story Change, Conflict and or Superhero REAL WORLD NEW WORLD The request!
  126. 126. The Online Story Change, Conflict and or Superhero REAL WORLD NEW WORLD The request!
  127. 127. There are many ways to tell stories online and accomplish a goal. • Ask a question on Twitter. • Follow people @. Follow things #. • Share bit by bit. Bit.ly • Comment on others. • Join a conversation. Interact with @ and #. • Change your words. Make it about the solution and not the problem.
  128. 128. Find your group and Global Ambassador. KATIE NICOLE Team ELKO Nevada Museum of Art RYAN Team FALLON Volunteers of America ANNIE Team TONOPAH The Children’s Cabinet BROOKE Team YERINGTON Big Brother/Big Sister
  129. 129. Just for fun. WHO WILL BE FIRST? FIND THE CURRENT WEATHER IN THE ASSIGNED CITY: You are asking @someone or following #something. NO MORE THAN 3 tweets though. You can do it, if you plan. 1. Elko: Lima, Peru 2. Yerington: Port Elizabeth, South Africa 3. Fallon: Bangkok, Thailand 4. Tonopah: Prague, Czech Republic
  130. 130. 1. Find your group and Global Ambassador. – Elko: Museum of Art - @nevadaart • The goal is to get people who have been to the original Shangra La in Hawaii to tweet specifics about the campus. You need to begin by researching the issue. You will use your group leader’s Twitter account. – Yerington: Big Brother Big Sister @BBBSNN • The goal is to get someone who had either a big brother or big sister to tweet his or her experience. You need to begin by researching the issue. You will use your group leader’s Twitter account. – Fallon: Volunteers of America @VOASAC • The goal is to remind people that Voasac also includes Northern Nevada while increasing the number of followers in Reno on the VOASAC Twitter page. You need to begin by researching the issue. You will use your group leader’s Twitter account. – Tonopah: Children’s Cabinet @TheChildrensCab • The goal is to get 35 new followers. You need to begin by researching the issue. You will use your group leader’s Twitter account.

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