Graffiti: A History of an Art Form

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  • Thirty eight seconds
  • Graffiti was becoming a weapon
  • Used by adolescents
  • To fight the establishment.
  • Graffiti: A History of an Art Form

    1. “A PAINTING IN A MUSEUM<br />hears more ridiculous opinions<br />
    2. than anything else in the world.”<br />~Edmond de goncourt<br />
    3. WRONG!<br />
    4. HERE’S JOHNNY!!!<br />
    5. But graffiti is, by definition, a defiant and public exhibition.<br />~pbs.org<br />
    6. NOT ART!<br />
    7. NOOOOOOOO!<br />
    8. Graffiti: The History of an Art Form<br />By: Theresa Nucciarone<br />Image taken by: Maria Malm<br />
    9. YAAAAAAAAY!<br />
    10. THE ROMANS!<br />THE GREEKS!<br />
    11. pungere con parole (ancheassol.): un'ironiachegraffia~garzantilinguistica. sapere.it.com<br />
    12. “Ancient graffiti displayed phrases of love declarations, political rhetoric, and simple words of thought compared to today's popular messages of social and political ideals”<br />~wikipedia.org<br />
    13. Humans have been writing symbols on walls since time immemorial. <br />~nymag.com<br />
    14. “People say graffiti is ugly, irresponsible and childish. But that’s only if it’s done properly.”<br />~Banksy<br />
    15. But it’s safe to place the origins of a New York style in the late sixties, as a younger generation’s artistic response to the public protests of the Black Power and civil-rights movements. ~nymag.com<br />
    16. The first modern graffiti writer is widely considered to be Cornbread, a high school student from Philadelphia, who in 1967 started tagging city walls to get the attention of a girl. <br />~pbs.org<br />
    17. "Seems logical to me captain."<br />
    18. These kids were rechanneling all of those hippie ideas about freedom, peace, love, and the democratization of culture by redefining the purpose of art. They represented a celebration of the rights of the salt of the earth over private property.<br />~nymag.com<br />BREAK ON THROUGH TO THE OTHER SIDE<br />
    19. By the mid seventies, many subway cars were so completely covered in top-to-bottom paintings.<br />~nymag.com<br />

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