State of Texas Water PlanWhat it Costs<br />Presented by Senator Kip Averitt<br />
Water is the key to one of the world&apos;s largest and most robust economies.<br />
WATER IS KEY TO OUR ECONOMY<br />One of the fastest growing statesin our country. Our population has more than tripled sin...
WATER IS KEY TO OUR ECONOMY<br />Texashas the 2nd largest state economy in the nation.<br />$1.8 trillion<br />$1.1 trilli...
WATER IS KEY TO OUR ECONOMY<br />Texashas the 11th largest economy in the nation.<br />
WATER IS KEY TO OUR ECONOMY<br />The Texas Economy<br />Has grown at $27 billion per year since 2001<br />Leading producer...
WATER IS KEY TO OUR ECONOMY<br />We are on a collision course.<br />By 2060, Texas will have 18% less water and <br />twic...
Water shortages <br />could be catastrophic.<br />
Water is Key to our Economy<br />By 2060, water supplies will decrease 18 percent and population will double to 46 million...
WATER IS KEY TO OUR ECONOMY<br />By 2060, water demand will increase 19% and water supplies will decrease 18%.<br />
“What you gonna do when <br />the well runs dry?” Fats Domino, 1957<br />
What are we doing?<br />Regional and State Water Planning<br />Consensus-driven process led by local communities who know ...
What are we doing?<br />Projected Water Shortages<br />We do not have enough water to meet the state’s water demands durin...
What are we doing?<br />Water Shortages for Different Water User Groups<br />Year 2010<br />Year 2060<br />
What are we doing?<br />Cost of Eliminating State Water Plan<br />To implement water strategies, project sponsors will nee...
What are we doing?<br />Current Funding for State Water Plan<br />Amount currently authorized for state loans and grant<br...
What are we doing?<br />Projects Currently Funded through TWDB Financing<br />$195<br />$114<br />$67<br />$79<br />$49<br...
What are we doing?<br />Comparison of 2010-2011 State Water Plan appropriations to other general revenue expenditures (in ...
What are we doing?<br />Additional State Water Plan Project Funding (in millions)<br />
What are we doing?<br />Additional State Water Plan Debt Service (in millions)<br />
Cost of complacency?<br />
“We are finding out that water is about as valuable as oil, only we can drink water.”<br />    -Kinney County Extension Ag...
Past Droughts: 1950-1957<br />The 1950’s drought lasted from 1950 to 1957 and was the worst in the state’s recorded histor...
Impacts of drought: Past, Present & Future<br />Droughts Today: North Texas 2006<br />In 2006, extreme drought scorched No...
Impacts of drought: Past, Present & Future<br />Droughts Today: North Texas 2006<br />In 2004, Lake Lavon was nearly full....
Impacts of drought: Past, Present & Future<br />Droughts Today: North Texas 2006<br />In 2004, Lake Lavon was nearly full....
Impacts of drought: Past, Present & Future<br />Droughts Today: Central Texas 2009<br />In 2009, a severe drought hit Cent...
Impacts of drought: Past, Present & Future<br />Droughts Today: Central Texas 2009<br />By the end of the summer, drought ...
Impacts of drought: Past, Present & Future<br />Future Droughts<br />Not meeting future water demands could cost the state...
Placeholder for “Texas crumbling”<br />(yvette still working on this)<br />
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State Of Texas Water Plan

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  • Economy has grown at $27 billion per year since 2001The leading crude oil-producing stateThe largest petrochemical producer; hosts nearly 30% of U.S. petroleum refining capacityLargestlivestock producer and 2nd in total U.S. agricultural salesIn 2008, over 70% of U.S. job growth occurred in TexasMore Fortune 500 companies are headquartered in Texas than any other state
  • State Of Texas Water Plan

    1. 1. State of Texas Water PlanWhat it Costs<br />Presented by Senator Kip Averitt<br />
    2. 2. Water is the key to one of the world&apos;s largest and most robust economies.<br />
    3. 3. WATER IS KEY TO OUR ECONOMY<br />One of the fastest growing statesin our country. Our population has more than tripled since 1950.<br />2060<br />46 million<br />2010<br />25 million<br />1950<br />7 million<br />
    4. 4. WATER IS KEY TO OUR ECONOMY<br />Texashas the 2nd largest state economy in the nation.<br />$1.8 trillion<br />$1.1 trillion<br />$1.2 trillion<br />Based on Gross Domestic Product<br />
    5. 5. WATER IS KEY TO OUR ECONOMY<br />Texashas the 11th largest economy in the nation.<br />
    6. 6. WATER IS KEY TO OUR ECONOMY<br />The Texas Economy<br />Has grown at $27 billion per year since 2001<br />Leading producer of crude oil and hosts nearly 30% of U.S. petroleum refining capacity<br />Ranked 1st in U.S. livestock production, 2nd in total U.S. agricultural sales<br />In 2008, over 70% of U.S. job growth occurred in Texas<br />More Fortune 500 companies are headquartered in Texas than any other state<br />
    7. 7. WATER IS KEY TO OUR ECONOMY<br />We are on a collision course.<br />By 2060, Texas will have 18% less water and <br />twice as many people.<br />
    8. 8. Water shortages <br />could be catastrophic.<br />
    9. 9. Water is Key to our Economy<br />By 2060, water supplies will decrease 18 percent and population will double to 46 million.<br />
    10. 10. WATER IS KEY TO OUR ECONOMY<br />By 2060, water demand will increase 19% and water supplies will decrease 18%.<br />
    11. 11. “What you gonna do when <br />the well runs dry?” Fats Domino, 1957<br />
    12. 12. What are we doing?<br />Regional and State Water Planning<br />Consensus-driven process led by local communities who know what is best for their economies and environment.<br />Planning groups recommend water management strategies designed to provide drought-proof water. <br />If implemented, the State Water Plan will ensure that our cities, farms, and industries have enough water in conditions comparable to the worst droughts in recorded history.<br />
    13. 13. What are we doing?<br />Projected Water Shortages<br />We do not have enough water to meet the state’s water demands during a serious drought.<br />
    14. 14. What are we doing?<br />Water Shortages for Different Water User Groups<br />Year 2010<br />Year 2060<br />
    15. 15. What are we doing?<br />Cost of Eliminating State Water Plan<br />To implement water strategies, project sponsors will need access to $17 billion of project capital costs through various financing mechanisms.<br />Financing State Water Plan Projects<br />
    16. 16. What are we doing?<br />Current Funding for State Water Plan<br />Amount currently authorized for state loans and grant<br />For 2008 through 2011, Legislature authorized the TWDB to issue $1.2 billion in loans and grants with a supporting appropriation of $145 million for debt service to fund water infrastructure from the State Water Plan.<br />
    17. 17. What are we doing?<br />Projects Currently Funded through TWDB Financing<br />$195<br />$114<br />$67<br />$79<br />$49<br />$77<br />$35<br />State Water Plan Projects Funded as of August 2009 (millions)<br />
    18. 18. What are we doing?<br />Comparison of 2010-2011 State Water Plan appropriations to other general revenue expenditures (in millions)<br />
    19. 19. What are we doing?<br />Additional State Water Plan Project Funding (in millions)<br />
    20. 20. What are we doing?<br />Additional State Water Plan Debt Service (in millions)<br />
    21. 21. Cost of complacency?<br />
    22. 22. “We are finding out that water is about as valuable as oil, only we can drink water.”<br /> -Kinney County Extension Agent, 1956<br />Cost of complacency?<br />
    23. 23. Past Droughts: 1950-1957<br />The 1950’s drought lasted from 1950 to 1957 and was the worst in the state’s recorded history.<br />Water supplies of some cities were exhausted<br />Low water levels in the Guadalupe River crippled 11 power plants<br />Purchased water cost more than gasoline in areas<br />The state’s population was only 7 million<br />Impacts of drought: Past, Present & Future<br />
    24. 24. Impacts of drought: Past, Present & Future<br />Droughts Today: North Texas 2006<br />In 2006, extreme drought scorched North Texas. Estimated economic impacts were $4.1 billion.<br />Extreme drops in water levels at several lakes<br />Lake Lavon was 15.5 feet below normal<br />Officials considered imposing severe water rationing<br />
    25. 25. Impacts of drought: Past, Present & Future<br />Droughts Today: North Texas 2006<br />In 2004, Lake Lavon was nearly full. <br />
    26. 26. Impacts of drought: Past, Present & Future<br />Droughts Today: North Texas 2006<br />In 2004, Lake Lavon was nearly full. <br />By September 2006, the lake was at 39% of total capacity.<br />
    27. 27. Impacts of drought: Past, Present & Future<br />Droughts Today: Central Texas 2009<br />In 2009, a severe drought hit Central Texas. <br />By March 2009, 100% of the state was in some form of drought<br />By late September 2009, 23% of the state was under severe, extreme, or exceptional drought<br />
    28. 28. Impacts of drought: Past, Present & Future<br />Droughts Today: Central Texas 2009<br />By the end of the summer, drought resulted in losses of at least$3.6 billion.<br />Canyon Lake hit a record low, and other reservoirs approaching record lows<br />Lake Travis was at 37% capacity and Lake Buchanan at 43% capacity<br />230 public water systems declared mandatory water restrictions<br />
    29. 29. Impacts of drought: Past, Present & Future<br />Future Droughts<br />Not meeting future water demands could cost the state $9.1 billion per year by 2010 and $98.4 billion per year by 2060.<br />(in billions)<br />(in billions)<br />2060<br />2060<br />2060<br />2010<br />2010<br />2010<br />
    30. 30. Placeholder for “Texas crumbling”<br />(yvette still working on this)<br />

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