NAD710 - Introduction to Networks Using Linux  Splitting a class C network into 4 subnets February 2,2001 Professor Tom Ma...
Things to Remember <ul><li>RFC950 - old rules, over 5 years old </li></ul><ul><li>Still used in some netware servers, if u...
Review-RFC950 <ul><li>An IP Address is broken up into three parts: the network portion, the subnet portion (optional), and...
Rules - RFC950 <ul><li>All hosts on the same subnet must agree on the subnet mask. Otherwise, packets actually intended fo...
Rules - RFC950 <ul><li>No two different subnets can include the same host address.  </li></ul><ul><li>The top and bottom h...
Valid Subnet <ul><li>Network is unique on either side of the Router. 192.168.1 + 192.168.2 </li></ul>
Invalid Network <ul><li>Same Network resides on both sides of Router. 192.168.1 </li></ul>
192.168.1.1 or  11000000.10101000.00000001.00000001 <ul><li>Lets break this network down into 4 subnets </li></ul><ul><li>...
List of networks for 192.168.1.1 <ul><li>The four networks we will get are </li></ul>
Network Address Calculation <ul><li>Binary and to get the network address 192.168.1.0 </li></ul>
Host Address <ul><li>Invert the subnet and do a binary and again to get the host address 0.0.0.1 </li></ul>
Broadcast address <ul><li>XOR to get the Broadcast address 192.168.1.63 </li></ul>
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Splitting A Class C Network Into 4 Subnets

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Splitting A Class C Network Into 4 Subnets

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Splitting A Class C Network Into 4 Subnets

  1. 1. NAD710 - Introduction to Networks Using Linux Splitting a class C network into 4 subnets February 2,2001 Professor Tom Mavroidis
  2. 2. Things to Remember <ul><li>RFC950 - old rules, over 5 years old </li></ul><ul><li>Still used in some netware servers, if unsure about environment adhere to RFC950. </li></ul><ul><li>RFC1812 - new rules, simplifies networking, introduces CIDR (Classless Inter-Domain routing). </li></ul><ul><li>Suse 6.4 supports IPv4. </li></ul>
  3. 3. Review-RFC950 <ul><li>An IP Address is broken up into three parts: the network portion, the subnet portion (optional), and the host portion. The size of the network portion is determined by the first byte of the address: </li></ul>
  4. 4. Rules - RFC950 <ul><li>All hosts on the same subnet must agree on the subnet mask. Otherwise, packets actually intended for another subnet may never leave the existing subnet: a host won't give to the router a packet it thinks is destined for the local segment. </li></ul>
  5. 5. Rules - RFC950 <ul><li>No two different subnets can include the same host address. </li></ul><ul><li>The top and bottom host numbers are reserved; the bottom one is shorthand for the whole subnet, and the top one is the broadcast address. </li></ul><ul><li>The bits in the subnet portion cannot be all ones </li></ul>
  6. 6. Valid Subnet <ul><li>Network is unique on either side of the Router. 192.168.1 + 192.168.2 </li></ul>
  7. 7. Invalid Network <ul><li>Same Network resides on both sides of Router. 192.168.1 </li></ul>
  8. 8. 192.168.1.1 or 11000000.10101000.00000001.00000001 <ul><li>Lets break this network down into 4 subnets </li></ul><ul><li>That means we need to borrow 2 bits from the host octet (byte). </li></ul><ul><li>Our default subnet mask is 255.255.255.0 or 11111111.11111111.11111111.00000000 </li></ul><ul><li>Borrowing 2 bytes gives us 128 + 64 = 192 or 11111111.11111111.11111111.11000000 or referred to as /26 or in dotted decimal notation </li></ul>
  9. 9. List of networks for 192.168.1.1 <ul><li>The four networks we will get are </li></ul>
  10. 10. Network Address Calculation <ul><li>Binary and to get the network address 192.168.1.0 </li></ul>
  11. 11. Host Address <ul><li>Invert the subnet and do a binary and again to get the host address 0.0.0.1 </li></ul>
  12. 12. Broadcast address <ul><li>XOR to get the Broadcast address 192.168.1.63 </li></ul>

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