Online Search Strategies Child Dev 105

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Tips and tricks for online searching, including how to choose good keywords and Boolean searching.

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Online Search Strategies Child Dev 105

  1. 1. Search Strategies Child Development 105
  2. 2. Use good KEYWORDS!
  3. 3. When Selecting KEYWORDS… <ul><li>Avoid common words, articles, or prepositions </li></ul><ul><li>(aka “ stop words ”) </li></ul>STOP WORDS a about an are as at be by from how in is it of on that the this to we what when where which with
  4. 4. <ul><li>In addition to omitting stop words, also get rid of any “value” words (like importance, good, negative, etc.) </li></ul><ul><li>How important is parent participation in </li></ul><ul><li>early childhood development? </li></ul><ul><li>You want to see all sides of an issue—not just the good or bad! </li></ul>
  5. 5. When selecting KEYWORDS… <ul><li>Be specific: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>“ preschool education ” and not just the word “ education ” </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Use correct spellling. (j/k: spelling) </li></ul><ul><li>If the topic is too broad, use the narrowest concept(s) first: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Learning theory (too broad) can be reduced to “ constructivism ” or “ Piaget ” </li></ul></ul>
  6. 6. When selecting KEYWORDS… <ul><li>Use Boolean operators (AND/OR) </li></ul><ul><li>Use “phrase searching” </li></ul>
  7. 7. Boolean Operators: “and” <ul><li>“ and” helps to limit the search </li></ul>play preschool education role of play in preschool education play AND preschool education
  8. 8. Boolean Operators: “or” <ul><li>“ or” helps to expand the search </li></ul>family parent family OR parent
  9. 9. Boolean Operators: Nesting <ul><li>The great thing about Boolean Operators is that you can “nest” them, too. </li></ul><ul><li>Nesting allows you to combine several search statements into one. </li></ul><ul><ul><li>( students OR children OR learners ) AND ( learning process ) </li></ul></ul>
  10. 10. Boolean Operators: Nesting continued… <ul><li>Notice this difference if you don’t use parentheses: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>“ child development ” AND families OR parents </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>What you get is a search that returns results on child development and families or anything related to parents (not necessarily education-related). </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>“ child development ” AND ( families OR parents ) </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>What you get is a search that returns results on child development and families AND child development and parents. Big difference! </li></ul></ul></ul>
  11. 11. Phrase Searching <ul><li>Searches for words side by side in the order you type them </li></ul><ul><li>Different from keywords since keywords do not have to be next to each other </li></ul><ul><li>Usually requires quotation marks around the words </li></ul><ul><ul><li>“ role of parents” ( phrase searching ) </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>vs. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>role of parents ( keywords ) </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Looks for any text with the word “role” and the stop word “of” and the word “parents”—even if they’re not right next to each other. </li></ul></ul></ul>

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