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#metaliteracy
Designing for Connectedness and Openness:
Advancing Metaliterate Learning
through MOOCs and Digital Badging
...
1. How can we leverage MOOC platforms to promote
learner-centered pedagogy based on a metaliteracy
framework?
2. How might...
• MOOCs must be designed with learners as central
drivers of their learning
• Foster lifelong learning competencies for se...
Four Domains of Metaliteracy
Metacognitive:
what learners think
about their own
thinking—a reflective
understanding of
how...
Learner Roles
Mackey and Jacobson (2014) Metaliteracy: Reinventing Information Literacy to Empower Learners
Metaliteracybadges.org
The Metaliteracy Badges
C-MOOC
Empowering Yourself as a Digital Citizen
Metaliteracy Supports
Multiple Learner Roles
Learner as Participant
• Decentralization
• Discussion forums showed deep eng...
Metaliteracy Supports
Learner Self-Regulation
Metaliteracy content promoted
– self-reflection
– intricate (supportive and ...
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Designing for Connectedness and Openness: Advancing Metaliterate Learning through MOOCs and Digital Badging

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This presentation examines metaliteracy as a pedagogical model in the design of three Massive Open Online Courses (MOOCs) and a competency based digital badging system (https://metaliteracybadges.org/). Metaliteracy is an empowering pedagogy that promotes metacognitive reflection and envisions the learner as critical consumer and creative producer in social media and collaborative communities (Mackey and Jacobson, 2011, 2014). The initial exploration of metaliteracy in the connectivist (Siemens, 2004) format informed the eventual design of related projects in the xMOOC platforms of Coursera and Canvas, including a recent on-demand version of the Coursera MOOC (https://www.coursera.org/learn/metaliteracy). As these projects emerged, a competency-based digital badging system was developed based on the metaliteracy learning goals and objectives that provided an interactive system with gamification components for learners to pursue quests and challenges leading to digital badges (http://www.metaliteracy.org). At a pivotal intersection of these open learning projects, the MOOC and badging platforms converged to inform a hybrid MOOC design. This reimagined strategy advanced metaliteracy through the original connectivist principles that initially inspired these innovative practices.

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Designing for Connectedness and Openness: Advancing Metaliterate Learning through MOOCs and Digital Badging

  1. 1. #metaliteracy Designing for Connectedness and Openness: Advancing Metaliterate Learning through MOOCs and Digital Badging The World Conference on Online Learning: Teaching in The Digital Age – Re-Thinking Teaching & Learning Tom Mackey, Kelsey O’Brien, Trudi Jacobson, and Michele Forte SUNY
  2. 2. 1. How can we leverage MOOC platforms to promote learner-centered pedagogy based on a metaliteracy framework? 2. How might metaliteracy be applied as a pedagogical strategy for supporting self-regulated learning in MOOCs? 2 O’Brien, K., Forte, M., Mackey, T. P., Jacobson, T.E., “Metaliteracy as Pedagogical Framework for Learner-Centered Design in Three MOOC Platforms: Connectivist, Coursera and Canvas.” Vol. 9, No. 3. Open Praxis. 2017. As Pedagogical Framework
  3. 3. • MOOCs must be designed with learners as central drivers of their learning • Foster lifelong learning competencies for self-regulation and learner agency • MOOCs are a decentralized learning model • Require a supportive pedagogy for students to take on active roles as participants, contributors and teachers 3 O’Brien, K., Forte, M., Mackey, T. P., Jacobson, T.E., “Metaliteracy as Pedagogical Framework for Learner-Centered Design in Three MOOC Platforms: Connectivist, Coursera and Canvas.” Vol. 9, No. 3. Open Praxis. 2017. As Pedagogical Framework
  4. 4. Four Domains of Metaliteracy Metacognitive: what learners think about their own thinking—a reflective understanding of how and why they learn, what they do and do not know, their preconceptions, and how to continue to learn Cognitive: what students should know upon successful completion of learning activities— comprehension, organization, application, evaluation Affective: changes in learners’ emotions or attitudes through engagement with learning activities Behavioral: what students should be able to do upon successful completion of learning activities— skills, competencies Mackey and Jacobson (2014) Metaliteracy: Reinventing Information Literacy to Empower Learners
  5. 5. Learner Roles Mackey and Jacobson (2014) Metaliteracy: Reinventing Information Literacy to Empower Learners
  6. 6. Metaliteracybadges.org The Metaliteracy Badges
  7. 7. C-MOOC Empowering Yourself as a Digital Citizen
  8. 8. Metaliteracy Supports Multiple Learner Roles Learner as Participant • Decentralization • Discussion forums showed deep engagement Learner as Contributor • cMOOC: aggregate, remix, repurpose, feed forward • Peer feedback Learner as Teacher • Student discomfort in this role • Peer review tools and discussion forums provided structure and guidance 8
  9. 9. Metaliteracy Supports Learner Self-Regulation Metaliteracy content promoted – self-reflection – intricate (supportive and collegial) connectivist interactions Needed: – Supportive scaffolding • cMOOC was too much of a free for all for most learners used to college courses 9 O’Brien, K., Forte, M., Mackey, T. P., Jacobson, T.E., “Metaliteracy as Pedagogical Framework for Learner-Centered Design in Three MOOC Platforms: Connectivist, Coursera and Canvas.” Vol. 9, No. 3. Open Praxis. 2017.

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