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Principals’ Retreat
August 10-11, 2011
Culture and Collaboration: Focusing on Learning
"The school culture must push
teachers to collaboratively
address new ways...
Introductions and Overview: TLLT
Curriculum Assessment Instruction
Continuous Improvement
to Align Our Work
• 8:30 – 11:30 Secondary
• 1 – 4pm ElementaryAdministrivia
• 9:30 – 12:30 in clusters
• Rotate sites
Vertical
Collaborativ...
Key Objectives for August 10-11
Develop our collaborative culture
Revisit the development of norms
Deepen our understan...
Meeting Procedures and Routines
High Five
Look for the “high five” as a signal to
come back together—a signal to wrap
up y...
Words of Wisdom
• Individually read the
quote at the top of the
page and respond to the
reflective prompts.
• When prompte...
Quote #1
"The single most important factor for successful
school restructuring and the first order of business
for those i...
Quote #2
"School leaders improve instruction by creating
structures and opportunities for teachers to
collaborate. Collabo...
Quote #3
"Teacher collaboration in strong professional
learning communities improves the quality
and equity of student lea...
Quote #4
"Collaborative practice is all about teachers and school
leaders working together to develop effective
instructio...
Quote #5
"When groups, rather than individuals, are
seen as the main units for implementing
curriculum, instruction, and a...
Quote #6
"Collaborative inquiry helped teachers build an evidence-
oriented professional community within the school.
Spec...
Quote #7
"Collaboration and the ability to engage in collaborative
action are becoming increasingly important to the
survi...
What Did We Learn?
• As a result of your
processing the
relevance of the
quotes on
collaboration, what
did we learn that
s...
The Role of Norm(s)
“Teams improve their ability
to grapple with the critical
questions when they clarify
the norms that w...
The Role of Norms
• What does the quote
from Katzenbach and
Smith mean for our
work as a collaborative
community of learne...
Norms of Collaboration Inventory
• Using Garmston and Wellman’s “Norms of Collaboration
Inventory” identify how your pract...
Redefining Norms
• Use your clicker to respond to each of the
prompts that follow:
– Click A for Rarely
– Click B for Occa...
Pausing
1. Listens attentively to others’ ideas with mind
and body
2. Allows time for thought after asking a
question or m...
Paraphrasing
4. Uses paraphrases that acknowledge and clarify
content and emotions: “So you’re concerned
about…”
5. Uses p...
Probing for Specificity
8. Seeks agreement on what words mean
9. Asks questions to clarify facts, ideas, stories
10.Asks q...
Putting Ideas on the Table & Pulling Them Off
12. States intention of communication: “Here is an idea for
consideration”
1...
Paying Attention to Self and Others
18.Maintains awareness of own thoughts and
feelings while having them
19.Maintains awa...
Presuming Positive Intent
21.Acts as if others mean well
22.Restrains impulsivity triggered by own
emotional responses
23....
Pursuing a Balance Between Advocacy & Inquiry
24. Advocates for own ideas and inquiries into the ideas of others: “Do
you ...
Glow and Grow
• Spend a couple of
minutes reviewing the
statements on the survey.
– As you think about the
categories and/...
Developing Norms
• Individually reflect on the following question:
– Given our processing and the importance of our workin...
Vertical (Cluster) Collaborative Teams
WEST CENTRAL EAST
Cherie Braspenik
Jon Bonneville
Erin Copeland
Gary Hamilton
Dave ...
SUPU Reflection on Learning:
Stand Up and Pair Up
• Join one of your
colleagues across the
room.
• Have one person
respond...
PUPU Reflection on Learning:
Pair Up and Pair Up
• Join two of your
colleagues to form a
group of four.
• Summarize your
c...
Break
• Be back to continue our
learning in 10 minutes!
Knowing Our Focus
1. What initiatives are guiding the efforts of your staff
members and you?
2. When you examine the draft...
Knowing Our Focus
Initiatives Rank: Time Rank: Resources Rank: Energy
Knowing Our Focus
• Complete the initiative matrix by:
– Documenting what initiatives are guiding
the efforts of your staf...
Knowing Our Focus
• Use the following stems
to discuss your
reflection…
– I discovered…
– I am excited by…
– I feel challe...
Horizontal Collaborative Teams
Secondary Collaborative Teams Elementary Collaborative Teams
Chris Bellmont
Cheri Braspenic...
Lunch Break
Be back and
ready to
continue our
learning at…
“What Are We Waiting For?”
“Imagine if everyone in a school thought that what
happened in every classroom, to every teache...
Step to the Line…
Step to the
line…if
you…
What’s Important?
• Review the list of
initiatives that guides
your work.
• As you do, rank them in
order of importance (1...
Wordle: Elementary Schools
Wordle: Secondary Schools
Wordle: District
Aligning Our Efforts
• Open your initiatives
sheet.
• Compare your
importance rankings to
the energy, time and
resources r...
Identifying Priorities
Note the following passage from Doug Reeves:
“The Law of Initiative Fatigue states that
when the nu...
Zoom
• What do the sequence
of pictures tell us about
how we view data?
• What did you discover
as each page “zoomed”
out?...
SIP: Current Reality
• Read the highlighted
sections from the
article, “Multiple
Measures.”
• Record a summary of
the deta...
Process Overview
SIP: Current Reality
• With your completed
“Details—Main Idea”
handout, form two lines
(facing each other...
Getting Clearer: Multiple Measures
SIP: Current Reality
• To deepen our collective
understanding of data
sources, each horizontal
collaborative team will wor...
SIP: Current Reality
• What does the data source describe?
• Why would this data source be important for
guiding our impro...
Break—Be Back in 5!
Exploring SIP Components
• Focus Areas
– Core Instruction
– Systems of Intervention
– Climate and Culture
– Community Enga...
Exploring SIP Components
• With your horizontal collaborative team, document the
following for your assigned component…
– ...
Process Overview
Exploring SIP Components
• Decide which two team
members will stay with chart.
– Stayers—explain thinking...
Norm Check
• How effectively
did we follow
our emerging
norms?
Key Messages
• What were the key
messages that we
learned today that will
guide our work and
learning with one
another?
Th...
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Principals August 10, 2011

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Day of Principal's Retreat 2011

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Principals August 10, 2011

  1. 1. Principals’ Retreat August 10-11, 2011
  2. 2. Culture and Collaboration: Focusing on Learning "The school culture must push teachers to collaboratively address new ways of thinking and provide specific strategies for implementation within their local context, allowing them to turn possibilities into reality for each learner. In the spirit of collaboration, school leaders and teachers must promote new ways of thinking and acting." G. Carter in "Learning and Teaching Still Matter"
  3. 3. Introductions and Overview: TLLT Curriculum Assessment Instruction Continuous Improvement to Align Our Work
  4. 4. • 8:30 – 11:30 Secondary • 1 – 4pm ElementaryAdministrivia • 9:30 – 12:30 in clusters • Rotate sites Vertical Collaborative Team • 8:30 – 11:30 Secondary • 1 – 4pm Elementary Horizontal Collaborative Team • 9:30 – 12:30 • ASC or Great RoomDistrict Alignment Meetings focused on the “Right Work” Site Visits, DLT work, and PD calendar aligned to support the work of principals and BLTs
  5. 5. Key Objectives for August 10-11 Develop our collaborative culture Revisit the development of norms Deepen our understanding of the PLC focus questions Deepen our understanding of the components of the School Improvement Plan framework Link our understanding of continuous improvement to PLCs, SIPS, and PD plans Reflect on our learning (shared knowledge)
  6. 6. Meeting Procedures and Routines High Five Look for the “high five” as a signal to come back together—a signal to wrap up your final point during a discussion as a sign of transition Meeting Documents Go to subfolder “Administrative Meetings” in shared folder for “Continuous Improvement” –look for meeting date to locate materials and processes and protocols In Case of Emergencies For meetings at DEC, have administrative assistant contact Judy Sherin at ext. 6279. At ASC, contact Jan Larsen at ext. 2005 Meeting By Memo Look for a “meeting by memo” that communicates information, shares resources, and provides updates that don’t need to be addressed at our meetings
  7. 7. Words of Wisdom • Individually read the quote at the top of the page and respond to the reflective prompts. • When prompted, find your colleagues who have the same quote as you do, share one highlight from your summer, and then generate a collective response to the quote.
  8. 8. Quote #1 "The single most important factor for successful school restructuring and the first order of business for those interested in increasing the capacity of their schools is building a collaborative internal environment." ~Eastwood & Seashore Louis, 1992
  9. 9. Quote #2 "School leaders improve instruction by creating structures and opportunities for teachers to collaborate. Collaboration works best when focused on expectations for student achievement and school goals, while contributing to the professional learning of teachers." ~Louis, Leithwood, Wahlstrom, & Anderson, 2010
  10. 10. Quote #3 "Teacher collaboration in strong professional learning communities improves the quality and equity of student learning, promotes discussions that are grounded in evidence and analysis rather than opinion, and fosters collective responsibility for student success." ~McLaughlin & Talbert, 2006
  11. 11. Quote #4 "Collaborative practice is all about teachers and school leaders working together to develop effective instructional practices, studying what works well in classrooms, and doing so both with rigorous attention to detail and with a commitment to improving not only one's practice but that of others…This is the essence of collaborative practice: teachers jointly engaged in empirical, routine, and applied study of their own profession." ~Mourshed, Chijiole, & Barber, 2010
  12. 12. Quote #5 "When groups, rather than individuals, are seen as the main units for implementing curriculum, instruction, and assessment, they facilitate the development of shared purpose for student learning and collective responsibility to achieve it." ~ Newmann & Wehlage, 1995
  13. 13. Quote #6 "Collaborative inquiry helped teachers build an evidence- oriented professional community within the school. Specifically, the process raised teacher awareness of the particular needs of individual students and facilitated an evaluation of the effectiveness of an instructional response." ~Robinson, et al., 2010
  14. 14. Quote #7 "Collaboration and the ability to engage in collaborative action are becoming increasingly important to the survival of the public schools. Indeed, without the ability to collaborate with others, the prospect of truly improving schools is not likely." ~Schlechty, 2005
  15. 15. What Did We Learn? • As a result of your processing the relevance of the quotes on collaboration, what did we learn that should guide and impact our work with one another?
  16. 16. The Role of Norm(s) “Teams improve their ability to grapple with the critical questions when they clarify the norms that will guide their work. These collective commitments represent the ‘promises we make to ourselves and others, promises that underpin two critical aspects of teams— commitment and trust.’” ~Katzenbach & Smith, 1995
  17. 17. The Role of Norms • What does the quote from Katzenbach and Smith mean for our work as a collaborative community of learners and leaders? • Briefly discuss this at your table. Norms v. Routines Norms are…agreed upon behaviors and expectations that guide our learning and work Routines are…common practices for how we “do” things
  18. 18. Norms of Collaboration Inventory • Using Garmston and Wellman’s “Norms of Collaboration Inventory” identify how your practices and behaviors align with statements for the categories that follow: – Pausing – Paraphrasing – Probing for Specificity – Putting Ideas on the Table and Pulling Them Off – Paying Attention to Self and Others – Presuming Positive Intent – Pursuing a Balance Between Advocacy and Inquiry
  19. 19. Redefining Norms • Use your clicker to respond to each of the prompts that follow: – Click A for Rarely – Click B for Occasionally – Click C for Frequently
  20. 20. Pausing 1. Listens attentively to others’ ideas with mind and body 2. Allows time for thought after asking a question or making a response (3-5 seconds) 3. Waits until others have finished before entering the conversation A=Rarely B=Occasionally C=Frequently
  21. 21. Paraphrasing 4. Uses paraphrases that acknowledge and clarify content and emotions: “So you’re concerned about…” 5. Uses paraphrases that summarize and organize: “We all seem to be concerned about…” 6. Uses paraphrases that shift a conversation to different levels of abstraction: “So a major goal here is to…” 7. Uses nonverbal communication in paraphrasing A=Rarely B=Occasionally C=Frequently
  22. 22. Probing for Specificity 8. Seeks agreement on what words mean 9. Asks questions to clarify facts, ideas, stories 10.Asks questions to clarify expectations, implications, consequences 11.Asks questions to surface assumptions, points of view, beliefs, values A=Rarely B=Occasionally C=Frequently
  23. 23. Putting Ideas on the Table & Pulling Them Off 12. States intention of communication: “Here is an idea for consideration” 13. Reveals all relevant information 14. Considers intended communication for relevance and appropriateness before speaking 15. Provides facts, inferences, ideas, opinions, suggestions 16. Explains reasons behind statements, questions, actions: “This is not an advocacy; I am just thinking out loud” 17. Removes, or announces the modification of, own ideas, opinions, points of view: “I think this idea is blocking us; let’s move on to other possibilities” A=Rarely B=Occasionally C=Frequently
  24. 24. Paying Attention to Self and Others 18.Maintains awareness of own thoughts and feelings while having them 19.Maintains awareness of others’ voice patterns, nonverbal communications, use of physical space 20.Maintains awareness of group’s tasks, mood, relevance of own and others’ contributions A=Rarely B=Occasionally C=Frequently
  25. 25. Presuming Positive Intent 21.Acts as if others mean well 22.Restrains impulsivity triggered by own emotional responses 23.Use positive presuppositions when responding to others’ inquiries: “I assume you might think differently. What are your ideas?” A=Rarely B=Occasionally C=Frequently
  26. 26. Pursuing a Balance Between Advocacy & Inquiry 24. Advocates for own ideas and inquiries into the ideas of others: “Do you see any flaws in my reasoning?” 25. Acts to provide equitable opportunities for participation: “In what ways do you see it differently?” 26. Presents rationale for positions, including assumptions, facts, feelings: “This is the data I have. This is what I think it means.” 27. Disagrees respectfully and openly with ideas and offers rationale for disagreement: “I am seeing this from the point of view of…” 28. Inquires of others about their reasons for reaching and occupying a position: “Can you help me understand your thinking here?” A=Rarely B=Occasionally C=Frequently
  27. 27. Glow and Grow • Spend a couple of minutes reviewing the statements on the survey. – As you think about the categories and/or statements on Garmston and Wellman’s survey, what is an area where you feel you “glow”? – What is an area in which you want to “grow”?
  28. 28. Developing Norms • Individually reflect on the following question: – Given our processing and the importance of our working with and learning with one another, what are the behaviors we expect and will accept from one another? • When prompted… – Join two other colleagues in your cluster – Share behaviors that you expect and will accept from one another – Generate an agreed upon list – Join the other two triads from your cluster and record the collective agreed upon list on the chart paper
  29. 29. Vertical (Cluster) Collaborative Teams WEST CENTRAL EAST Cherie Braspenik Jon Bonneville Erin Copeland Gary Hamilton Dave Helke Don Leake Rob Nelson Jeremy Willey Kristine Black Renee Brandner Kay Fecke Kari Komar Jeff Leach Susan Risius Gene Roczniak Elizabeth Vaught Taber Akin Chris Bellmont Lyle Bomsta Bill Heim Sarah Kloeckl Elaine Mehdizadeh Bruce Morrissette Janice Porter Kelly Ronn
  30. 30. SUPU Reflection on Learning: Stand Up and Pair Up • Join one of your colleagues across the room. • Have one person respond to question 1 and the other person respond to question 2. 1. What did we learn about collaboration? 2. What did we learn about the renewing and sustaining norms?
  31. 31. PUPU Reflection on Learning: Pair Up and Pair Up • Join two of your colleagues to form a group of four. • Summarize your conversations about questions 1 and 2. • As a group, discuss question 3 and be prepared to summarize your response to question 3 for the whole group. 1. What did we learn about collaboration? 2. What did we learn about the renewing and sustaining norms? 3. What can or will we do as a result of our learning?
  32. 32. Break • Be back to continue our learning in 10 minutes!
  33. 33. Knowing Our Focus 1. What initiatives are guiding the efforts of your staff members and you? 2. When you examine the draft copies of your SIP and PD plans, how are resources (human, financial, time, etc.) being allocated? What is top priority with regard to time? With regarding funding? Where is your energy being spent?
  34. 34. Knowing Our Focus Initiatives Rank: Time Rank: Resources Rank: Energy
  35. 35. Knowing Our Focus • Complete the initiative matrix by: – Documenting what initiatives are guiding the efforts of your staff members and you – Ranking them with regard to the time being allocated – Ranking them with regard to the resources allocated to support each initiative – Ranking them according to the energy they take to support
  36. 36. Knowing Our Focus • Use the following stems to discuss your reflection… – I discovered… – I am excited by… – I feel challenged by… – I am concerned about… – I need… Process Overview Constructivist Listening Dyad Clear Protocols Focus on Listening Provide Stems/Prompts Summarization
  37. 37. Horizontal Collaborative Teams Secondary Collaborative Teams Elementary Collaborative Teams Chris Bellmont Cheri Braspenick Renee Brandner Erin Copeland Gary Hamilton Dave Helke Kelly Ronn Jenne O’Neill-Mager Taber Akin Kristine Black Erin Copeland Kay Fecke Kari Komar Rob Nelson Elizabeth Vaught Bill Heim Sarah Kloeckl Kari Komar Jeff Leach Don Leake Bruce Morrissette Janice Porter Gene Roczniak Lyle Bomsta Jon Bonneville Sarah Kloeckl Elaine Mehdizadeh Susan Risius Jackie Smith Jeremy Willey
  38. 38. Lunch Break Be back and ready to continue our learning at…
  39. 39. “What Are We Waiting For?” “Imagine if everyone in a school thought that what happened in every classroom, to every teacher and every student, was of tremendous significance and that quality learning was the most valued commodity. What would that mean for how time is used? What would it enable in teams of teachers’ interactions with others? What would principals, teachers, and community members believe in and expect? What would students be able to accomplish?” Martin-Kneip, 2008
  40. 40. Step to the Line… Step to the line…if you…
  41. 41. What’s Important? • Review the list of initiatives that guides your work. • As you do, rank them in order of importance (1, 2, 3, 4, etc.) in relation to making the greatest difference for student learning.
  42. 42. Wordle: Elementary Schools
  43. 43. Wordle: Secondary Schools
  44. 44. Wordle: District
  45. 45. Aligning Our Efforts • Open your initiatives sheet. • Compare your importance rankings to the energy, time and resources rankings. – Are they in sync? – What’s discrepant? – What do you discover?
  46. 46. Identifying Priorities Note the following passage from Doug Reeves: “The Law of Initiative Fatigue states that when the number of initiatives increases while time, resources, and emotional energy are constant, then each new initiative—no matter how well conceived or well intentioned—will receive fewer minutes, dollars, and ounces of emotional energy than its predecessors.”
  47. 47. Zoom • What do the sequence of pictures tell us about how we view data? • What did you discover as each page “zoomed” out? • How does the “zooming” relate to multiple measures?
  48. 48. SIP: Current Reality • Read the highlighted sections from the article, “Multiple Measures.” • Record a summary of the details on the “Details—Main Idea” sheet.
  49. 49. Process Overview SIP: Current Reality • With your completed “Details—Main Idea” handout, form two lines (facing each other) at the back of the room. • When prompted, take turns sharing the details you recorded. Bite-Sized Reading… Efficient Identifies key concepts to be “covered” Serves as scaffold Details—Main Idea… Formative assessment Develops analysis and synthesis skills Encourages summarization Learning Line Up… Movement Multiple perspectives Collaborative meaning making Efficient
  50. 50. Getting Clearer: Multiple Measures
  51. 51. SIP: Current Reality • To deepen our collective understanding of data sources, each horizontal collaborative team will work collaboratively on a Google doc • http://tinyurl.com/4ydcwsj Data Sources: – Student Achievement – Demographics – Perception – School Processes (Program)
  52. 52. SIP: Current Reality • What does the data source describe? • Why would this data source be important for guiding our improvement practices? • What information and/or resources do we need to effectively use and understand the data source? • How does our understanding of this data source impact our data analysis?
  53. 53. Break—Be Back in 5!
  54. 54. Exploring SIP Components • Focus Areas – Core Instruction – Systems of Intervention – Climate and Culture – Community Engagement
  55. 55. Exploring SIP Components • With your horizontal collaborative team, document the following for your assigned component… – What does your assigned component describe? – Why would your assigned component be important for guiding your improvement practices? – What information and/or resources do we need to effectively use and understand your assigned component? – How we will know our improvement efforts will make a difference (criteria for improvement)? • Use the chart paper and marker provided to document your team’s thinking
  56. 56. Process Overview Exploring SIP Components • Decide which two team members will stay with chart. – Stayers—explain thinking, engage discussion • Use assigned color to add questions, additional perspectives to the thinking of other components • Strayers—deepen thinking, add to emerging understanding One Stay, The Rest Stray… Blends emerging understanding with dialogue Adds multiple perspectives Movement Efficient Charting a Colorful Course… Allows for questions, additions from all groups Helps monitor which group made additions, updates Use as formative assessment Movement Efficient
  57. 57. Norm Check • How effectively did we follow our emerging norms?
  58. 58. Key Messages • What were the key messages that we learned today that will guide our work and learning with one another? Think about… Creating collaborative culture Developing norms Knowing and aligning initiatives Understanding multiple measures Understanding SIP components

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