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Getting started with blended, University of Tampa

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A presentation given at University of Tampa on 2.17.15.

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Getting started with blended, University of Tampa

  1. 1. follow @tjoosten twitter.com/tjoosten slideshare.net/tjoosten TanyaJoosten.com Professorjoosten.blogspot.com Getting started with blended
  2. 2. Overview
  3. 3. Process
  4. 4. Step 1: What is blended? What is blended? How is it different from face-to-face? Online? others? What are the similarities and differences with flipped? UT2015.wikispaces.com
  5. 5. Share Flickr cc niklaswikstrom
  6. 6. A scholarly definition At the 2005 Sloan-C Workshop on Blended Learning, the following was adopted by the participants and will serve as the accepted definition of blended learning for this paper: 1. Courses that integrate online with traditional face-to- face class activities in a planned, pedagogically valuable manner; and 2. Where a portion (institutionally defined) of face-to- face time is replaced by online activity [2]. (Picciano, 2006, p. 97).
  7. 7. Conceptualization
  8. 8. Sloan-C/OLC definition
  9. 9. An institutional definition
  10. 10. Web-enhanced 0 - 20% Blended 21 - 99% Online 100% Blended 1 21 - 50% Online with commensurate reduction in seat time Blended 3 81 - 99% Online with commensurate reduction in seat time Blended 2 51 - 80% Online with commensurate reduction in seat time An institutional definition
  11. 11. Redefining blended • F2F  Online • Low tech  High tech • Active  Passive learning • Integration  Separaaration
  12. 12. A definition for students
  13. 13. Step 2: How is it different? What considerations do you have when transforming your course to blended? Specifically, What elements of your course design and your delivery will potentially change? UT2015.wikispaces.com
  14. 14. Pedagogical model
  15. 15. Content
  16. 16. Interactivity
  17. 17. Assessment
  18. 18. • Ten questions • Designing learning modules • Online vs. F2F - Integration • Decision rubric for content choices • Learning objects Content • Progressive/summative • Before, during, and after • Self evaluation • Peer evaluation • Student evaluation Course Evaluation • Rubrics • CATs • Templates • Traditional formats Assessment • Synchronous/asynchronous • Establishing voice • Discussion forums • Small groups Interactivity • Managing expectations • Time management • Technology support Helping Your Students • Staying organized • Managing workload • Avoiding course and a half Course Management Course Redesign Transitioning to blended teaching Considerations
  19. 19. Step 3: How to make it Thinking of content, interactivity, and assessment, what will you blended course look like? What do you have to do to transform your course for blended learning? What is your redesign plan?
  20. 20. The 10 questions Review the 10 questions, NMSU14.wikispaces.com Consider which question you find most important, intriguing, problematic, or surprising? Pair with a partner, share which question you identified and your response in considering the question in your own course design. Share with rest of us one highlight from your discussion
  21. 21. Share Flickr cc eq
  22. 22. Five issues in “perfecting” • “Course and a half” syndrome • Re-examining course goals and objectives • Building presence, enhancing connectivity, and building community • Community building • Managing your time and staying organized
  23. 23. follow @tjoosten twitter.com/tjoosten slideshare.net/tjoosten TanyaJoosten.com Professorjoosten.blogspot.com Questions
  24. 24. Transforming your course Flickr cc sir_mervs
  25. 25. Redesigning your course using the 10 questions
  26. 26. Course details • Original course design – Organizational Communication, COM MUN310 – Original Design: Night classes, 3 hours app. • Course Transformation – Goal: To more effectively use valuable f2f time – Means: Focus on task requirements and medium selection – Experience teaching fully online and fully f2f – New Design: Reduced class time, 45% online, 55% F2F
  27. 27. Sample Module Wednesday Sunday Week 1 F2F Class -Agenda posted -Reading available online -Individual project task due Week 2 Online Class -Discussion post due -Discussion responses due Week 3 -Complete Weekly Quiz prior to class F2F Class -Targeted discussion from quiz results and discussion forum -Group project task due
  28. 28. What goes online? • Content Delivery – Acquire basic content (lecture and reading) – Assess understanding of basic content (discussion forums, rubrics, and quizzes)
  29. 29. Lecture formats
  30. 30. Sample text lecture
  31. 31. Sample audio lecture
  32. 32. Content
  33. 33. What goes online? • Content Delivery – Acquire basic content (lecture and reading) – Assess understanding of basic content (discussion forums, rubrics, and quizzes)
  34. 34. Sample discussion forum
  35. 35. Sample quiz
  36. 36. Sample online agenda • Thursday, Agenda Posted • Tuesday, Reading and Lecture • Tuesday, Initial Discussion Post • Wednesday, Response Post • Thursday, Quiz (prior to class)
  37. 37. What goes face-to-face? • Decreases students’ equivocality and uncertainty • Allow for instant feedback for understanding • Provide opportunity for higher order learning • Presentations of group work done outside of class
  38. 38. What goes online? • Building Learning Community – Online discussion questions – Group experiential learning activities (virtual labs)
  39. 39. What goes online? • Summative Assessment – Assess achievement of learning objectives for course (midterm and final exams)
  40. 40. What goes online? Content Delivery  Acquire basic content (lecture and reading)  Assess understanding of basic content (discussion forums, rubrics, and quizzes) Building Learning Community  Online discussion questions  Group activities Summative Assessment  Assess achievement of learning objectives for course
  41. 41. Sample Module Wednesday Sunday Week 1 F2F Class -Agenda posted -Reading available online -Individual project task due Week 2 Online Class -Discussion post due -Discussion responses due Week 3 -Complete Weekly Quiz prior to class F2F Class -Targeted discussion from quiz results and discussion forum -Group project task due
  42. 42. What goes face-to-face? Decreases students’ equivocality and uncertainty Allow for instant feedback for understanding Provide opportunity for higher order learning Presentations of group work done outside of class
  43. 43. Sample quiz stats
  44. 44. Keys to a successful transformation • TIP 1: Avoid course and a half • TIP 2: Promote online learning community • Tip 3: Plan for integration. • Tip 4: Don’t feel that you have to follow the traditional f2f scheduling format. • Tip 5: Assess both mediums, online and f2f. • Tip 6: Manage student expectations
  45. 45. follow @tjoosten twitter.com/tjoosten slideshare.net/tjoosten TanyaJoosten.com Professorjoosten.blogspot.com Questions
  46. 46. More about content
  47. 47. Content delivery What is the task? What type of delivery is “best”? What technology is available to me? What skills do I have?
  48. 48. Lecture formats
  49. 49. Sample text only lecture
  50. 50. Sample audio lecture
  51. 51. What lecture format did you prefer? Why? I preferred the standard ppt w/ notes because that was the easiest for me to access from my home computer and was the easiest to print out. I chose ppt form as don't need to be online all the time. And I can study the slides whenever i want to. It also has the option of outlines, which helps in studying.
  52. 52. More comments I can go at my own pace and re-read things I need to, otherwise skim things I don't need certain depth on. so you had to listen to the powerpoints and sometimes people just didn’t have the time, but could read them thoroughly and reference them better…we are online classes because we don’t have the time or access to sit through a lecture on a computer. But we could all work reading a really good powerpoint through into our schedules.
  53. 53. Audio introductions
  54. 54. follow @tjoosten twitter.com/tjoosten slideshare.net/tjoosten TanyaJoosten.com Professorjoosten.blogspot.com Questions
  55. 55. Tips on developing activities Focus on Building Learning Community integrating collaborative activities and asynchronous discussion forums Backward Design What should students know, understand, and be able to do? What will I accept as evidence of student understanding and proficiency? What activities will allow students to achieve this?
  56. 56. Backward Design •Introduced by Wiggins and McTighe in Understanding by Design (2005) •Instructors begin with learning goals and outcomes rather than activities •Effective in online and blended courses because students need more structure
  57. 57. Key Questions in Backward Design • What do you want your students to do (not just know)? • What evidence will you accept that they have accomplished that? • What learning activities will produce this evidence or documentation?
  58. 58. Why Use Backward Design? • Practice-oriented instead of abstract theory • Learning objectives linked to verifiable outcomes • Fosters an online peer learning community
  59. 59. What’s in a Learning Module? • A chunk of content • A learning activity • A mode of assessing student work
  60. 60. Planning using backwards design Identify Desired Results (DO): Be able to analyze and critique decision making processes Acceptable Evidence: Accurate written application of theory from the content given a decision making situation in determining what was effective and what was ineffective in the decision making process. Learning Experience: Students view video clips from Apollo 13 Students post analysis that integrates concepts from reading and lecture
  61. 61. Apollo 13
  62. 62. Developing a learning module
  63. 63. follow @tjoosten twitter.com/tjoosten slideshare.net/tjoosten TanyaJoosten.com Professorjoosten.blogspot.com Questions

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