Museum Research Methods

MUSM7034
Semester 1 2009

Session 3.2 Audience Segmentation
www.arts.usyd.edu.au/departs/museum

...
Audience segmentation

q   Demographic
q   Geographic
q   Behavioural
q   Psychographic




[2] Museum Research Methods 20...
Demographic segmentation

q   Age – life stage
q   Gender
q   Income
q   With children




[3] Museum Research Methods 2009
Geographic segmentation

q   Local – define by travel time (an hour) or location

q   Regional – define by travel time (1-...
Behavioural segmentation

q   Repeat visitor / regular visitor

q   Holiday program user

q   School program user

q   Mem...
Psychographic segmentation
Five Factor Personality Traits – The “Big Five” – OCEAN


q   Openness (curiosity, adventure) –...
Questions

YOU LIKE TO GARDEN AND POTTER AROUND THE HOUSE AT WEEKENDS
YOU THRIVE ON THE COMPANY OF OTHER PEOPLE
YOU ARE VE...
Environmetrics Leisure Segments


                                Practical and organised                                 ...
Application

q   Program planning – social events

q   Interpretation
     q Social learning opportunities for extraverts
...
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3.2 Audience Segmentation

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  • Map territory (hypothesis-generating). Qual can tell what kinds of people come (indicative). 80/20 rule; you get most information from the first small group of people. To get the last 20% takes a LOT more data. Generally social research in an applied setting is content with imperfect data. Do qual study to find out what kind of people come; do quant study to measure how many/what proportion come.Explanatory – add perspective to simple counts. Why do few people stop at a display? Out of the way, uninteresting, too cold.If your audience are accountants, economists or come from experimental sciences, they will want numbers, don’t rely on qualitative methods, use some quant as well.a) many qualitative researchers believe that the best way to understand any phenomenon is to view it in its context. b) Many qual believe that as each of us experiences from our own point of view and has a different reality, therefore amalgamated data invalid.
  • The ethnographer becomes immersed in the culture as an active participant and records extensive field notes. Phenomenology is a school of thought that emphasizes a focus on people's subjective experiences and interpretations of the world. That is, the phenomenologist wants to understand how the world appears to others. Field Research – the essential idea is that the researcher goes \"into the field\" to observe the phenomenon in its natural state or in situ. A case study is an intensive study of a specific individual or specific context.
  • Spider graph or Footprint graph
  • 3.2 Audience Segmentation

    1. 1. Museum Research Methods MUSM7034 Semester 1 2009 Session 3.2 Audience Segmentation www.arts.usyd.edu.au/departs/museum http://musm7034.ning.com/
    2. 2. Audience segmentation q Demographic q Geographic q Behavioural q Psychographic [2] Museum Research Methods 2009
    3. 3. Demographic segmentation q Age – life stage q Gender q Income q With children [3] Museum Research Methods 2009
    4. 4. Geographic segmentation q Local – define by travel time (an hour) or location q Regional – define by travel time (1-2 hours) or location q Australia (tourist) q Overseas (tourist) [4] Museum Research Methods 2009
    5. 5. Behavioural segmentation q Repeat visitor / regular visitor q Holiday program user q School program user q Member q Other behaviours/activities [5] Museum Research Methods 2009
    6. 6. Psychographic segmentation Five Factor Personality Traits – The “Big Five” – OCEAN q Openness (curiosity, adventure) – strong predictor of museum interest Heritability q Conscientiousness (achievement, self-discipline) Openness: 57% q Extraversion (energy, company of others) Extraversion: 54% Conscientiousness: 49% q Agreeableness (cooperation, compassion) Neuroticism: 48% Agreeableness: 42% q Neuroticism (emotional instability) [6] Museum Research Methods 2009
    7. 7. Questions YOU LIKE TO GARDEN AND POTTER AROUND THE HOUSE AT WEEKENDS YOU THRIVE ON THE COMPANY OF OTHER PEOPLE YOU ARE VERY FASHION CONSCIOUS YOU WANT TO ACHIEVE A LOT YOU ARE REALLY A “HOMEBODY” YOU HATE GETTING DRESSED UP YOU WOULD RATHER WATCH TV ON SATURDAY NIGHT THAN GO OUT YOU WOULD RATHER HAVE A BBQ WITH FRIENDS THAN EAT AT A RESTAURANT YOU ARE INTERESTED IN ABSTRACT IDEAS [7] Museum Research Methods 2009
    8. 8. Environmetrics Leisure Segments Practical and organised Practical and organised 25% 25% Social pleasure seekers Gregarious, out and about Social pleasure seekers Gregarious, out and about Self contained, go with the Individualistic, out and about Self contained, go with the flow Individualistic, out and abo flow 0% 0% Conventional suburban Moderate and unhurried Conventional suburban Moderate and unhurried Battlers Discerning and purposeful Battlers Discerning and purposeful [8] Museum Research Methods 2009
    9. 9. Application q Program planning – social events q Interpretation q Social learning opportunities for extraverts q Reflection time for introverts q Marketing – tone and language [9] Museum Research Methods 2009

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