TIRF
The International
Research Foundation
for English Language Education
Visit TIRF’s website at
http://www.tirfonline.org
Mobile Learning:
A Paradigm Shift
in
Democratizing Learning Access
TESOL International Convention
Portland, OR
2014
Presenters
Philip Hubbard, Senior Lecturer and Director of English for
Foreign Students, Stanford University Language Cen...
TIRF
Overview of the Six
Commissioned Papers
On Mobile Language Learning
Phil Hubbard, Stanford University
TESOL 2014
Beatty: Beyond the Classroom
 Notes mobile learning is becoming
unrelated to classroom learning
 Learners may use tools ...
Beatty: Beyond the Classroom
 Identifies key issues
– Learners
– Teachers
– Policymakers
– Employers
 Teacher developmen...
Hockly: Designer Learning
 Key point: Teachers as effective
designers of mobile learning experiences
 Action research: i...
Hockly: Designer Learning
 Pegrum’s 4 MALL types: content, tutorial,
creation, communication
 Issues of concern for stud...
Kukulska-Hulme: Reskilling Learners
 Key point: Learners need new skills
for mobile language learning
 Need to make conn...
Kukulska-Hulme: Reskilling Learners
 Different groups have different
opportunities & challenges
 Models: specified-activ...
Stockwell & Hubbard: Principles
 3 MALL issues and 10 emerging
principles for design and practice
 Physical issues
 Ped...
Stockwell & Hubbard: Principles
 Example Principles
– P2 Limit multi-tasking & distractions
– P3 Push but respect boundar...
Sweeney: Evidence for Benefits
 MALL for English in the workplace
 Looking for evidence of differential
benefits of MALL...
Sweeney: Evidence for Benefits
 Some key findings for learners
– Limits of ‘digital natives’; benefits of training
– Impa...
Traxler: Past Speaks to the Future
 Mobile technology characteristics
– Delivery mechanism with unexploited
affordances
–...
Traxler: Past Speaks to the Future
 Challenges: scaling up, sustaining,
embedding, and providing evidence
 Transformatio...
Conclusion
 Final comments
 Go to http://www.tirfonline.org/english-in-the-
workforce/mobile-assisted-language-
learning...
TIRF
Mobile-Assisted & 1:1
Language Learning
Michael Carrier
Cambridge English Language Assessment
TESOL Portland 2014
What are MALL & 1:1?
MALL:
Use of portable devices to give learners access to learning
materials, learning activities and...
Equity and access
All learners should have access to knowledge and education; for this we
need Devices and Connectivity an...
Technology-supported: learners at the centre
Face-to-face
classroom
eTutors
VOIP & FaceTime
Learning
device
LMS as hub
Ble...
New pedagogical models
Less formal learning Formal learning
Communicative
content creation
Teacher-led
(inc. remote)
Self-...
New classroom models
In-class vs Out-of-class model
Before Class In Class After Class
Activities:
• Writing
• Comprehension
questions
• Online ...
1:1 & language learning
• Access to anytime anywhere
learning
• Access to authentic models of
English
• Develop new forms ...
1:1 classroom management
Plan Ceibal – remote teaching, local support
Remote teacher
using video-
phone
Students with
Classroom
laptops
Local class...
1:1 Policy development
Investment focus Budget
Technology infrastructure:
•Bandwidth
•Equipment – 1:1 devices &
BYOD syste...
1:1 Policy - Digital teacher competences
30
• Personal development:
Technology awareness;
curiosity; User training
• Lesso...
Cambridge – research to apps to exams
Cambridge ALTA
Research Institute
ALTA researches into:
• text and speech
processing...
Babel fish?
Research – TIRF mobile language learning papers
• 8 papers on
current state of
mobile learning
approaches to
teaching of
E...
Mobile Learning: A Paradigm Shift in
Democratizing Learning Access
Brazilian context:
5th
largest country in the world
D...
How is mobile learning a part of our educational landscape
in Brazil and how close are we to a paradigm shift?
 Current s...
Current situation in Brazil: Barriers for MALL
Barriers for use of technology in Education
in Brazil
Uneven access to bro...
Current situation in Brazil: Barriers for MALL
The public system
 Insufficient funding for schools
 Critical teacher sit...
Current situation of tablets in schools:
a revolution to come
Current Status
In 2011 the Federal Government
announced the ...
Current situation of tablets in schools:
a revolution to come
Current Status
Criticism for lack of planning:
“We understoo...
Current situation: Tablet distribution in State of
São Paulo
 Coverage of 25% teachers
 Only 50% using tablets
 Distrib...
Current situation: Tablet distribution in State of
São Paulo
All schools have a multi-media kit,
some being equipped as in...
Current situation: Opportunities
Opportunities for mobile use
Mobile phone 1.3 per capita, Russia 1.8
85% Android
 Smar...
Current situation: Opportunities
Drivers for increase of access and speed of broadband
Consumer expectations to watch maj...
Current situation: Opportunities
The spontaneous use of mobile
by the learner (mainly urban)
 Records classes for use in ...
Current situation: Opportunities
Other drivers of change
Students rich experience with internet out of classroom will
pus...
Current situation of a face to face language provider of
English as a Foreign Language
Technology available in organizatio...
Raquel´s class
Language Provider: The opportunities we envisage
from TIRF papers for use of MALL
Providers should consider:
 Curriculum:...
Language Provider: The opportunities we envisage
from TIRF papers for use of MALL
Review of classroom practice:
 Alternat...
Challenges for teacher development programmes
 Encourage teachers to use mobile devices
effectively with affordances and ...
Challenges for teacher development programmes
 More familiarization sessions on potential
of tools and suitable free and ...
Other challenges
 Use, limits and risks of social networking
(teacher leadership)
 Rethink learning process to leverage
...
Future tendencies: MALL in Brazil
The distribution of mobile technology preceded
various critical planning phases:
Politi...
Future tendencies: MALL in Brazil
Mobiles in education will grow as a natural
choice
Growth of mobile market
Brazilian c...
MALL in Brazil: How close are we to a paradigm
shift?
In 2014 an aspiration that will take at least 5 years to consolidate...
Bureau of Educational and Cultural Affairs
U.S. Department of State
The Office of English Language Programs
presents the
...
English and the Global Mobile Audience
How can the State Department get English language
learning content to a diverse aud...
 Roughly 75% of the world’s mobile
subscriptions are in developing
countries
 Feature phones make up more than
80% of th...
Reaching the Mobile Audience
Introducing the free American English (AE) mobile app!
English Education Alliance partners, ...
Watch the AE app in action
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3Hhxvi2DHwU
 Students: practice on the go!
Teachers: bring mul...
Quizzes
Quizzes
biNu Technology Makes the AE App Possible
 Our partner offers a free platform for feature phones that provides
smartphone...
biNu
 5+ million monthly mobile users
 Cloud-based: 10x less data used
 Java-enabled feature phones or Android
devices
...
How to download the AE App
1. To download, open the internet browser on your mobile device
2. Type in http://m.binu.com/ae...
For more information, visit the
American English Mobile App
resource webpage
 Search for “mobile” on
http://americanengli...
Contact Information
Visit Us!
americanenglish.state.gov
AmericanEnglishatState
Office of English Language Programs
U.S. De...
ELT for the Next Generation
Challenges of
Hardware and Human-ware in a
Tech-Emergent Environment
Richard Boyum
US Departme...
Take if for Granted versus Daily Uncertainty
Power
Bandwidth
Delivery
Take if for Granted versus Daily Uncertainty
Power
 Load shedding
 Generator
 Fuel
Take if for Granted versus Daily Uncertainty
Bandwidth
 3G 4G ??
 Feature Phone

Smart Phone
Take if for Granted versus Daily Uncertainty
Delivery

The last 100 yards

Access

Hot Spots
In spite of it all….
 The example of a professor in South Asia:
 Bought smartphone 3 yrs ago
 Explored apps - found dic...
Expanding the Repertoire
 Sounds
 Conversation
 Writing Skills
 IELTS
 TOEFL
 I usually engage them in group work ac...
Challenges
 Half the class has smartphones
 Most think of phone for communication – text/call
 Few realize that the mob...
Challenges
 Attitudes toward learning (Sts and T):
learning = teacher lecturing
instead: You can learn outside of class
L...
Way Forward
As mobile technology expands its reach....
Encourage teachers to take the lead.
Students will follow and emb...
ELT for the Next Generation
Challenges of
Hardware and Human-ware in a
Tech-Emergent Environment
Richard Boyum
US Departme...
Mobile Learning:
A Paradigm Shift
in
Democratizing Learning Access
TESOL International Convention
Portland, OR
2014
TIRF at 2014 TESOL - MALL Panel Presentation
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TIRF at 2014 TESOL - MALL Panel Presentation

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TIRF's panel presentation on mobile-assisted language learning at the 2014 TESOL Convention in Portland, Oregon. Panel presenters, Dr. Phil Hubbard, Stanford University, with Trustees Lorraine de Matos, Michael Carrier, Richard Boyum, and Marti Estell, the US State Department's Observer to the Board, discussed that a paradigm shift is well underway regarding the landscape of ELT and the impact of MALL.

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  • I would separate these into two slides.
  • I would separate these into two slides.
  • I would separate these into two slides.
  • Delivery:Online and face-to-face. The online course requires a qualified and experienced moderator.
    Length of course:Each workshop module (14 in total) lasts between 90 and 120 minutes – a total of about 25 hours
    Each online module (17 in total) lasts about 3 hours, with extra material and video demonstration about the technologies involved – a total of about 50 hours
    Structure of course:This is a teacher development course that introduces teachers of English to the main aspects of using new technologies in the language classroom. The course modules cover both web 1.0 and web 2.0 technologies, with topics including using the internet, cyber well-being for learners, using MS Office applications, using online video and audio, and using social networking and other web 2.0 technologies for educational purposes.
    Suitable for:Teachers at stages 1 to 4 of the Framework who are relatively inexperienced in using technologies in the language classroom. The course takes into account different situations in which teachers find themselves: both where technology is only available outside the classroom, and where the classroom is well-resourced with IT. It includes a wide range of practical ideas and web resources that teachers can directly use with their learners.
    Certification:A British Council certificate will be awarded to participants on completing the course and the required tasks.
    Available:Already available
    Revenue opportunities:Run online courses at a regional or country level and charge an affordable fee to participants. Run workshops and charge participants a fee. License to other training providers.
  • Source: GSMA and Informa Telecoms
  • ITU and GSMA data - in just 10 years, developing countries have gone from accounting for just 29 percent of mobile subscriptions worldwide to 77 percent of subscriptions.
    Feature phones (non-smart phones, e.g., Nokia 6600) are the largest segment of the global mobile market. Feature phones make up over 80% of this market with over 5 billion mobile subscribers worldwide, most of which are in countries with emerging economies. The AE biNu app can be downloaded directly by end-users, enabling the State Department to reach this global mobile audience.
  • THE “AMERICAN ENGLISH” (AE) MOBILE APP: The AE app enables the State Department to reach new and underserved audiences with “anytime, anywhere” English language resources on the mobile devices that they already own. biNu created the AE app (a custom version of the award-winning biNu app) and an AE content section within the mainstream biNu “Education” offerings. The AE app consolidates State Department mobile English language learning content in one easy-to-find location; this content includes e-books, audiobooks, music, quizzes, and the “Trace Word Soup” vocabulary game. Voice of America news feeds for English learners and a variety of other language, news, and social media content are also available on the app.
    E2A partners – no-cost partnerships with the State Department
    biNu technology allows users to access the Internet faster and uses up to 10 times less data than standard mobile browsers.
    The app is free; however, users are responsible for the data usage costs charged by their mobile provider. The AE app works with nearly any type of mobile phone that runs Java or Android (most phones made after 2002). The iPhone and Windows phones are not yet supported. 2G+ mobile connection is required. See this link for more information about phone compatibility: http://www.binu.com/apps-cloud/compatibility/
  • Another feature we’ve recently added is the Quizzes section. You can take quizzes on a wide variety of topics, such as homophones, idioms, and more.
    Quizzes for language learners – this area is being built out with additional quizzes to accommodate several learner levels
    Quizz descriptions can be roughly translated into almost any language (Spanish and Arabic shown).
  • Simple discreet-item quizzes
    Feedback provided, including explanatory information
    Score information provided, option to share via social media
  • - biNu is a privately held company that uses a free mobile application platform to dramatically improve internet access, speed, usability, and social connectivity for lower-end mobile phones; these phones account for more than 80% of the global mobile phone market. The biNu platform is used by over 5 million people monthly worldwide, most of whom are in countries with emerging economies. The biNu platform is free; the cost to end-users is their mobile provider’s data charges. biNu claims its data compression system requires an average of 10 times less bandwidth than traditional network modes, which makes mobile data access more cost-effective for users. Learn more about biNu at http://www.binu.com.
  • - biNu is a privately held company that uses a free mobile application platform to dramatically improve internet access, speed, usability, and social connectivity for lower-end mobile phones; these phones account for more than 80% of the global mobile phone market. The biNu platform is used by over 5 million people monthly worldwide, most of whom are in countries with emerging economies. The biNu platform is free; the cost to end-users is their mobile provider’s data charges. biNu claims its data compression system requires an average of 10 times less bandwidth than traditional network modes, which makes mobile data access more cost-effective for users. Learn more about biNu at http://www.binu.com.
    - 10X less data than standard web browsers as all processing in cloud-based
    Works with nearly any type of mobile phone that runs Java or Android
    biNu offers integrated language features that can help mobile users bridge gaps between English language content and their first language. Languages offered include Afrikaans, Arabic, Bahasa Indonesia, Chinese, French, Kiswahili, Portuguese, Spanish, Russian, Urdu and many more.
  • To install, you must click 'Yes' to all prompts.
    Java: will be feature phones (phones with manual buttons/keys, non-smart phones, “dumbphones”, etc.)
    Android: only for phones that run the Android operating system (not iOS, not Windows phones)
    Different phone models may install the app in different locations. If the app isn’t on the device’s “desktop” see this website for help: http://m.binu.com/where.php
    On most Nokia phones try:- Menu - Applications - Extras- Menu - Applications – Games
    For additional help see: http://www.binu.com/faq/
    Users may create a username and enter their mobile number to register their device to access all features such as leaderboards in games, social media, etc.
    There are usually two or three “nags” screens once users log in; “nags” are intro screens created by biNu and highlight features within the biNu platform (surveys, new content, etc.) Users can skip these items if desired.
  • Public-facing resource page on the American English Website:
    http://americanenglish.state.gov/resources/american-english-mobile-app
    Internal information:
    PD Toolkit: https://connect.infocentral.state.gov/pdtoolkit/index.php/American_English_Website#American_English_App
    Public Affairs Sections, RELOs, IROs, and American Spaces are encouraged to promote the AE app as part of their English language initiatives. Additional background information about the AE app can be found in the PD Toolkit (https://connect.infocentral.state.gov/pdtoolkit/index.php/American_English_Website#American_English_Mobile_App) and on the American English resource page (http://americanenglish.state.gov/resources/american-english-mobile-app). Resources include: a demonstration YouTube video of the app being used on a feature phone; a Powerpoint presentation and information that explains the app features, how to access it, and suggestions for use by teachers, learners, and in programming (e.g., in American Spaces); a link to the app download site; and media coverage notes.
     
  • TIRF at 2014 TESOL - MALL Panel Presentation

    1. 1. TIRF The International Research Foundation for English Language Education Visit TIRF’s website at http://www.tirfonline.org
    2. 2. Mobile Learning: A Paradigm Shift in Democratizing Learning Access TESOL International Convention Portland, OR 2014
    3. 3. Presenters Philip Hubbard, Senior Lecturer and Director of English for Foreign Students, Stanford University Language Center Michael Carrier, Director of Strategic Partnerships for Cambridge English, a division of University of Cambridge. Lorraine de Matos, General Manager of the Cultura Inglesa, São Paulo, Brazil, Marti Estell, Director of English Language Programs at the US Department of State’s Bureau of Educational and Cultural Affairs Richard Boyum, Department of State University Partnership Coordinator for Afghanistan and Pakistan
    4. 4. TIRF Overview of the Six Commissioned Papers On Mobile Language Learning Phil Hubbard, Stanford University TESOL 2014
    5. 5. Beatty: Beyond the Classroom  Notes mobile learning is becoming unrelated to classroom learning  Learners may use tools instead of learning languages (augmented reality)  Link MALL to situated learning
    6. 6. Beatty: Beyond the Classroom  Identifies key issues – Learners – Teachers – Policymakers – Employers  Teacher development  Workforce applications
    7. 7. Hockly: Designer Learning  Key point: Teachers as effective designers of mobile learning experiences  Action research: implementing mobile communicative tasks for EFL (two weeks)  Six parameters: hardware, mobility, technological complexity, linguistic/ communicative competence, type of MALL, & educational/learning context
    8. 8. Hockly: Designer Learning  Pegrum’s 4 MALL types: content, tutorial, creation, communication  Issues of concern for study: small scale, multilingual context, low proficiency, ad-hoc nature  Future: Keep the 6 parameters in mind plus teachers’ TPACK (Technological Pedagogical Content Knowledge)
    9. 9. Kukulska-Hulme: Reskilling Learners  Key point: Learners need new skills for mobile language learning  Need to make connections between life and learning  Need to focus on learners’ personal interests for content and communication  Little research on mobile learners’ strategies and learning styles
    10. 10. Kukulska-Hulme: Reskilling Learners  Different groups have different opportunities & challenges  Models: specified-activity, proposed- activity, & learner-driven  Need studies on a wider variety of learners and especially on advanced learners
    11. 11. Stockwell & Hubbard: Principles  3 MALL issues and 10 emerging principles for design and practice  Physical issues  Pedagogical issues  Psycho-social issues  Draw principles from CALL, ML & MALL
    12. 12. Stockwell & Hubbard: Principles  Example Principles – P2 Limit multi-tasking & distractions – P3 Push but respect boundaries – P5 Acknowledge learner differences – P6 Be aware of learner cultures-of-use – P9 Provide guidance and learner training
    13. 13. Sweeney: Evidence for Benefits  MALL for English in the workplace  Looking for evidence of differential benefits of MALL  Method: Structured interviews of 7 practitioners across 10 classes  Reasons for MALL: efficiency, relevance, teacher motivation, student expectations, & commercial imperatives
    14. 14. Sweeney: Evidence for Benefits  Some key findings for learners – Limits of ‘digital natives’; benefits of training – Impact of culture and context on self-access – Laptops as mobile devices  Some key findings for teachers – Tasks appropriate for content, context, & skills – Teachers as mobile users – Transformation of pedagogic context
    15. 15. Traxler: Past Speaks to the Future  Mobile technology characteristics – Delivery mechanism with unexploited affordances – Modifier of learning: outsourced cognition – Determinant of linguistic practices & discourse  ML categories: reaching out, enriching, learning from one another, role of theory, motivating, & just-in-case vs. just-in-time
    16. 16. Traxler: Past Speaks to the Future  Challenges: scaling up, sustaining, embedding, and providing evidence  Transformations – Space, place, identity & community – Social practices – Knowing & learning – Language & discourse
    17. 17. Conclusion  Final comments  Go to http://www.tirfonline.org/english-in-the- workforce/mobile-assisted-language- learning/ (or just Google TIRF MALL)  Note also the Language Learning & Technology special issue on MALL: http://llt.msu.edu/issues/october2013/ Email: phubbard@stanford.edu
    18. 18. TIRF Mobile-Assisted & 1:1 Language Learning Michael Carrier Cambridge English Language Assessment TESOL Portland 2014
    19. 19. What are MALL & 1:1? MALL: Use of portable devices to give learners access to learning materials, learning activities and assessment •In class = tablets, laptops •Out of class = phones, tablets 1:1 movement: •commitment to providing every learner with her own device for use in and out of class •new classroom management approach using 1:1 in communicative and collaborative pedagogical models
    20. 20. Equity and access All learners should have access to knowledge and education; for this we need Devices and Connectivity and a commitment to OERs Devices: •Device provided by school •BYOD – shared in groupwork •Developing world – need donor involvement Connectivity: •3G – 5G •Fibre to the school •WiMAX •Satellite
    21. 21. Technology-supported: learners at the centre Face-to-face classroom eTutors VOIP & FaceTime Learning device LMS as hub Blended learning Big Data: Tracking & Portfolio The LearnerIndividualised pathways Social learning Handheld learning On-demand content Cloud synchronisation Adaptive learning Speech recognition & AI tools Learning – oriented assessment
    22. 22. New pedagogical models Less formal learning Formal learning Communicative content creation Teacher-led (inc. remote) Self-directed digital 1:1 device groups Group- oriented Self- study Alignment of needs and technologies:
    23. 23. New classroom models
    24. 24. In-class vs Out-of-class model Before Class In Class After Class Activities: • Writing • Comprehension questions • Online workbook • Practise vocab with Apps • Formative assessment Activities: • Reading & Listening activities • Study text • Learn vocab online • Grammar in Use activity with Apps Activities: • Speaking activities • Pairwork • Concept questions • Communication activities, games storytelling • Mentoring
    25. 25. 1:1 & language learning • Access to anytime anywhere learning • Access to authentic models of English • Develop new forms of communicative pairwork activity in class • Create content: tell a group- developed story • More time on task - more hours per week for English study, outside class • Reinforce parts of classwork • Prepare ahead in Flipped mode • Increase motivation Not yet available: •Students can’t learn to speak – though they can learn to listen and improve pronunciation •Students can’t carry out natural speech interaction with a virtual partner •Technology can’t understand and semantically respond to student speech (though can transcribe it and translate it)
    26. 26. 1:1 classroom management
    27. 27. Plan Ceibal – remote teaching, local support Remote teacher using video- phone Students with Classroom laptops Local class teacher managing activity Local classroom: TV screen showing remote teacher Lesson materials shown via Webex 2-way video & audio Joint lesson planning 28
    28. 28. 1:1 Policy development Investment focus Budget Technology infrastructure: •Bandwidth •Equipment – 1:1 devices & BYOD systems 33% Teacher development: •pre-service •in-service 33% Curriculum update: •pedagogical models, language syllabus, assessment systems Digital content: •textbooks, authentic input, activities, apps 33% Policy checklist Strategy: •Outcomes •Measurement •Quality Standards •Sustainability Pedagogical models: •Curriculum design/integration •Teacher training •Classroom design Technology: •Connectivity •Device-agnostic content •Platform agnostic content •Issues: •BYOD, AR, ASR, IWB, LMS, QR, Flipped Classroom
    29. 29. 1:1 Policy - Digital teacher competences 30 • Personal development: Technology awareness; curiosity; User training • Lesson planning: how to integrate digital content • Classroom management: how to coordinate formal & informal activities • Classroom management online: how to manage a virtual classroom • Digital tools & media awareness: how to create new content with students “You can fill all the classrooms with computers, but if you don’t train the teachers on how to use them effectively, [your] investment will lose all of its purpose.” Dr. Huseyin Celik, former minister of education, Turkey
    30. 30. Cambridge – research to apps to exams Cambridge ALTA Research Institute ALTA researches into: • text and speech processing • machine learning • corpus development and analysis
    31. 31. Babel fish?
    32. 32. Research – TIRF mobile language learning papers • 8 papers on current state of mobile learning approaches to teaching of English • Download from: author title Ken Beatty Beyond the classroom: mobile learning in the wider world Agnes Kukulska-Hulme Re-skilling language learners for a mobile world Nicky Hockly Designer learning: the teacher as designer of mobile- based classroom learning experiences Philip Hubbard and Glenn Stockwell Some emerging principles for mobile-assisted language learning John Traxler Mobile Learning for Languages - Can The Past Speak to the Future? Nik Peachey Quality reviews of language learning materials available for mobile devices, including those for workplace English Paul Sweeney TBC Matthew Kam TBC www.tirfonline.org Contacts: Carrier.m@cambridgeenglish.org
    33. 33. Mobile Learning: A Paradigm Shift in Democratizing Learning Access Brazilian context: 5th largest country in the world Diversity of income and living conditions Disparity in access to quality education Pisa ranking 58th out of 65 Teaching: a low-status profession Most teachers of English under B1 level (Council of Europe CEFR)
    34. 34. How is mobile learning a part of our educational landscape in Brazil and how close are we to a paradigm shift?  Current situation in Brazil  Current situation of a face to face language provider of EFL  Future tendencies
    35. 35. Current situation in Brazil: Barriers for MALL Barriers for use of technology in Education in Brazil Uneven access to broad band – better in urban areas Brazil average speed 2.4 mbps,3.6 Mexico and 8.7 USA Low quality, high cost telecommunication services Wi-fi not available in every school Learning environment teacher led and print dependent Learning rarely considers real life needs
    36. 36. Current situation in Brazil: Barriers for MALL The public system  Insufficient funding for schools  Critical teacher situation due to:  Low salaries  Challenging working conditions  Low-tech  Resistance to change  Gap in competences  Lack of relevant digital content esp. language learning  Unprepared leadership (tech)
    37. 37. Current situation of tablets in schools: a revolution to come Current Status In 2011 the Federal Government announced the distribution of 600.000 tablets for teachers in 2012. (happened 2013/14).  R$180 million for tablets  R$73 million for digital content  R$1 billion for books  And training?
    38. 38. Current situation of tablets in schools: a revolution to come Current Status Criticism for lack of planning: “We understood how the tablet worked when it arrived at the school”. Head of school in State of Pernambuco
    39. 39. Current situation: Tablet distribution in State of São Paulo  Coverage of 25% teachers  Only 50% using tablets  Distribution to high schools, urban areas  Restricted to some subjects (exact sciences, biology)  1 orientation session per bimester  Teachers of English not included
    40. 40. Current situation: Tablet distribution in State of São Paulo All schools have a multi-media kit, some being equipped as interactive Examples of content:  Khan Academy (Physics/Maths/ Biology/Chemistry)  Teachers’ portal, MEC (Ministry of Education)
    41. 41. Current situation: Opportunities Opportunities for mobile use Mobile phone 1.3 per capita, Russia 1.8 85% Android  Smart phones with Android operating system allow computer operations for lower income groups  Brazil 2nd largest market for Facebook at 58 million accounts
    42. 42. Current situation: Opportunities Drivers for increase of access and speed of broadband Consumer expectations to watch major sporting events Needs of the 12 host cities (World Cup) Improvement in cost-efficiency Introduction of higher speeds Growth of use of corporate cloud-based applications
    43. 43. Current situation: Opportunities The spontaneous use of mobile by the learner (mainly urban)  Records classes for use in long commutes to work/school  Takes photos of homework, flipcharts  Downloads texts, presentations  Uses WhatsApp for sharing with colleagues  Watches films in streaming video
    44. 44. Current situation: Opportunities Other drivers of change Students rich experience with internet out of classroom will push school activity Cheap or free access through: Lan houses, smart phones, community centres, libraries and work places, etc
    45. 45. Current situation of a face to face language provider of English as a Foreign Language Technology available in organization IWBs in classrooms Multi media centres Desktops and laptops for homework Mobile devices used by teachers (uneven uptake) Mobile devices used by most students for informal learning (edutainment) and homework BYOD
    46. 46. Raquel´s class
    47. 47. Language Provider: The opportunities we envisage from TIRF papers for use of MALL Providers should consider:  Curriculum: a more intensive use of personal road maps for students  Need for investment in learning analytics to enable customized learning (make or buy)  Coverage of multiple OS  Incorporation of social networking tools for more open learning sources
    48. 48. Language Provider: The opportunities we envisage from TIRF papers for use of MALL Review of classroom practice:  Alternative ways and pace of learning  Inclusion of what students learn out of school and is meaningful  Co-authoring of learning experience  Inclusion of learning that can take place wherever, whenever and with whoever
    49. 49. Challenges for teacher development programmes  Encourage teachers to use mobile devices effectively with affordances and limitations ( not transfer past repertoire)  Support teachers to build confidence and competence in the transfer of students’ skills as proficient personal mobile users  Trigger reflection of the power of mobile technology to enhance learning  Improve understanding of digital literacy
    50. 50. Challenges for teacher development programmes  More familiarization sessions on potential of tools and suitable free and paid content  How to design relevant self-access content, activities and skills development and not depend solely on haphazard use of what teacher or student comes across  MALL should be embedded in the learning vision
    51. 51. Other challenges  Use, limits and risks of social networking (teacher leadership)  Rethink learning process to leverage informal knowledge  Provide alternative mobile based learning solutions beyond supplementary/ enhancement use for mobile devices
    52. 52. Future tendencies: MALL in Brazil The distribution of mobile technology preceded various critical planning phases: Politicians/education leaders need to redefine the strategy for use of curriculum and technology to fit current needs of students and employers (Explore, Sustain, Renew) A move to student-centred learning. Huge challenge for Brazil Teacher development programmes needed for digital literacy of teachers
    53. 53. Future tendencies: MALL in Brazil Mobiles in education will grow as a natural choice Growth of mobile market Brazilian celular phone carriers offer language courses at low prices. Other suppliers are attracted to this market Free and low cost apps allowing multi device use will gain popularity in classrooms Increase of broadband will allow more access to open content
    54. 54. MALL in Brazil: How close are we to a paradigm shift? In 2014 an aspiration that will take at least 5 years to consolidate Success in the classroom will depend on… the readiness of the teachers the heart of the matter the missing piece to the puzzle
    55. 55. Bureau of Educational and Cultural Affairs U.S. Department of State The Office of English Language Programs presents the AMERICAN ENGLISH MOBILE APP for Teachers and Learners of English as a Foreign Language Abroad
    56. 56. English and the Global Mobile Audience How can the State Department get English language learning content to a diverse audience on the mobile devices they already own?
    57. 57.  Roughly 75% of the world’s mobile subscriptions are in developing countries  Feature phones make up more than 80% of the mobile phone market Defining the Mobile Audience
    58. 58. Reaching the Mobile Audience Introducing the free American English (AE) mobile app! English Education Alliance partners, biNu and Worldreader, support the Department in delivering resources to lower-tech mobile devices The AE mobile app  Uses data compression to reduce access costs  Requires a 2G+ mobile internet connection  Compatibility: feature phones & Android phones
    59. 59. Watch the AE app in action http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3Hhxvi2DHwU  Students: practice on the go! Teachers: bring multimedia content into the classroom without high-tech equipment and encourage students to study outside of class
    60. 60. Quizzes
    61. 61. Quizzes
    62. 62. biNu Technology Makes the AE App Possible  Our partner offers a free platform for feature phones that provides smartphone-like capabilities
    63. 63. biNu  5+ million monthly mobile users  Cloud-based: 10x less data used  Java-enabled feature phones or Android devices  Language support: 18+ languages  Translates menus, icon labels, etc.  Google Translate & dictionary support
    64. 64. How to download the AE App 1. To download, open the internet browser on your mobile device 2. Type in http://m.binu.com/ae 3. Choose the file type needed for your device  Java – feature phones (non-smart phones)  Android – 1. Follow the installation prompts (click “yes”) 2. Look for the AE app on your phone 3. Supply registration information for full access to all features (optional)
    65. 65. For more information, visit the American English Mobile App resource webpage  Search for “mobile” on http://americanenglish.state.gov biNu Demo
    66. 66. Contact Information Visit Us! americanenglish.state.gov AmericanEnglishatState Office of English Language Programs U.S. Department of State americanenglish@state.gov
    67. 67. ELT for the Next Generation Challenges of Hardware and Human-ware in a Tech-Emergent Environment Richard Boyum US Department of State South and Central Asia Office of Public Diplomay
    68. 68. Take if for Granted versus Daily Uncertainty Power Bandwidth Delivery
    69. 69. Take if for Granted versus Daily Uncertainty Power  Load shedding  Generator  Fuel
    70. 70. Take if for Granted versus Daily Uncertainty Bandwidth  3G 4G ??  Feature Phone  Smart Phone
    71. 71. Take if for Granted versus Daily Uncertainty Delivery  The last 100 yards  Access  Hot Spots
    72. 72. In spite of it all….  The example of a professor in South Asia:  Bought smartphone 3 yrs ago  Explored apps - found dictionary, then others Meeting the Challenge I used a phonetic chart application a lot because I was teaching phonetics and phonology. I advised my students to download that app from android apps market. Almost half of my students use android Mobile phones so they can easily get these apps and start using them.
    73. 73. Expanding the Repertoire  Sounds  Conversation  Writing Skills  IELTS  TOEFL  I usually engage them in group work activities so that they can at least practice language skills using the mobile application and master its use. Some of them do use these applications when they are out of class or at home.
    74. 74. Challenges  Half the class has smartphones  Most think of phone for communication – text/call  Few realize that the mobile is no longer just a device for communication, but a rather full computer for many uses.
    75. 75. Challenges  Attitudes toward learning (Sts and T): learning = teacher lecturing instead: You can learn outside of class Learning can be fun You can learn from a device  Teachers need orientation/training, need to know and use the apps  Android market offers many applications that can assist the teachers and learners in teaching and learning English. However, most of the teachers and students are not aware of these apps. The need is to introduce these apps and provide the teachers required training for using these apps in language teaching and learning.
    76. 76. Way Forward As mobile technology expands its reach.... Encourage teachers to take the lead. Students will follow and embrace the technology One click at a time…..
    77. 77. ELT for the Next Generation Challenges of Hardware and Human-ware in a Tech-Emergent Environment Richard Boyum US Department of State South and Central Asia Office of Public Diplomay
    78. 78. Mobile Learning: A Paradigm Shift in Democratizing Learning Access TESOL International Convention Portland, OR 2014

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