Certification and Targeting an Audience Y12 Media Studies British Film
Learning Outcomes <ul><li>Be able to explain the role of the BBFC and how they classify films </li></ul><ul><li>Know  how ...
Starter <ul><li>Write down the last five films you have seen. </li></ul><ul><li>Write down the certificate of each film (i...
The BBFC <ul><li>The British Board of Film Classification. </li></ul><ul><li>What is their role? </li></ul>
“The British Board of Film Classification is an independent, non-governmental body, which has classified cinema films sinc...
The Classifications <ul><li>Read through the handout; it gives information on the role of the BBFC and it’s classification...
The Classifications
<ul><li>Theme </li></ul><ul><li>Mature themes are acceptable, but their  treatment must be suitable for young teenagers. <...
<ul><li>Theme </li></ul><ul><li>No theme is prohibited, provided the treatment is appropriate to 15 year olds. </li></ul><...
<ul><li>In line with the consistent findings of the BBFC's public consultations, at '18' the BBFC's guideline concerns wil...
PG13 <ul><li>Vigilance on issues of harm and age appropriateness is also evident in the Board’s treatment of a number of b...
The Dark Knight
Senior MPs have criticised the British Board of Film Classification's decision to allow young children to see the new Batm...
This is England <ul><li>From the opposite view point, we received a number of requests for our classification decisions to...
Targeting
Targeting <ul><li>Why do films target specific audiences? </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Generate maximum revenue (it’s no good hav...
Past Question <ul><li>Discuss the issues raised by an institution’s need to target specific audiences within the British f...
How do films target audiences according to… <ul><li>Certificates </li></ul><ul><li>Gender </li></ul><ul><li>Age </li></ul>...
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BBFC - Certification and Targeting an Audience

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  • the stuff on the new Batman film was helpful..cheers
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BBFC - Certification and Targeting an Audience

  1. 1. Certification and Targeting an Audience Y12 Media Studies British Film
  2. 2. Learning Outcomes <ul><li>Be able to explain the role of the BBFC and how they classify films </li></ul><ul><li>Know how and why film producers / distributors target specific audiences. </li></ul>
  3. 3. Starter <ul><li>Write down the last five films you have seen. </li></ul><ul><li>Write down the certificate of each film (if you don’t know, make an educated guess). </li></ul><ul><li>Write down why you think the film was given that certificate. </li></ul><ul><li>Do you agree with the certificates? Why? </li></ul>
  4. 4. The BBFC <ul><li>The British Board of Film Classification. </li></ul><ul><li>What is their role? </li></ul>
  5. 5. “The British Board of Film Classification is an independent, non-governmental body, which has classified cinema films since it was set up in 1912, and videos since the passing of the Video Recordings Act in 1984.”
  6. 6. The Classifications <ul><li>Read through the handout; it gives information on the role of the BBFC and it’s classification system. </li></ul><ul><li>Answer the questions in your own words, considering your own view on the issues. </li></ul>
  7. 7. The Classifications
  8. 8. <ul><li>Theme </li></ul><ul><li>Mature themes are acceptable, but their treatment must be suitable for young teenagers. </li></ul><ul><li>Language </li></ul><ul><li>The use of strong language (eg 'fuck') must be infrequent. Racist abuse is also of particular concern. </li></ul><ul><li>Nudity </li></ul><ul><li>Nudity is allowed, but in a sexual context must be brief and discreet. </li></ul><ul><li>Sex </li></ul><ul><li>Sexual activity may be implied. Sex references may reflect what is likely to be familiar to most adolescents but should not go beyond what is suitable for them. </li></ul><ul><li>Violence </li></ul><ul><li>Violence must not dwell on detail. There should be no emphasis on injuries or blood. Sexual violence may only be implied or briefly and discreetly indicated. </li></ul><ul><li>Imitable techniques </li></ul><ul><li>Dangerous techniques (eg combat, hanging, suicide and self-harming) should not dwell on imitable detail or appear pain or harm free. Easily accessible weapons should not be glamorised. </li></ul><ul><li>Horror </li></ul><ul><li>Sustained moderate threat and menace are permitted. Occasional gory moments only. </li></ul><ul><li>Drugs </li></ul><ul><li>Any misuse of drugs must be infrequent and should not be glamorised or instructional. </li></ul>
  9. 9. <ul><li>Theme </li></ul><ul><li>No theme is prohibited, provided the treatment is appropriate to 15 year olds. </li></ul><ul><li>Language </li></ul><ul><li>There may be frequent use of strong language (eg 'fuck'). But the strongest terms (eg 'cunt') will be acceptable only where justified by the context. Continued aggressive use of the strongest language is unlikely to be acceptable. </li></ul><ul><li>Nudity </li></ul><ul><li>Nudity may be allowed in a sexual context but without strong detail. There are no constraints on nudity in a non-sexual or educational context. </li></ul><ul><li>Sex </li></ul><ul><li>Sexual activity may be portrayed but without strong detail. There may be strong verbal references to sexual behaviour. </li></ul><ul><li>Violence </li></ul><ul><li>Violence may be strong but may not dwell on the infliction of pain or injury. Scenes of sexual violence must be discreet and brief. </li></ul><ul><li>Imitable techniques </li></ul><ul><li>Dangerous techniques (eg combat, hanging, suicide and self-harming) should not dwell on imitable detail. Easily accessible weapons should not be glamorised. </li></ul><ul><li>Horror </li></ul><ul><li>Strong threat and menace are permitted. The strongest gory images are unlikely to be acceptable. </li></ul><ul><li>Drugs </li></ul><ul><li>Drug taking may be shown but the film as a whole must not promote or encourage drug misuse. </li></ul>
  10. 10. <ul><li>In line with the consistent findings of the BBFC's public consultations, at '18' the BBFC's guideline concerns will not normally override the wish that adults should be free to chose their own entertainment, within the law. Exceptions are most likely in the following areas: </li></ul><ul><li>where material or treatment appears to the Board to risk harm to individuals or, through their behaviour, to society – e.g. any detailed portrayal of violent or dangerous acts, or of illegal drug use, which is likely to promote the activity. The Board may also intervene with portrayals of sexual violence which might, e.g. eroticise or endorse sexual assault. </li></ul><ul><li>the more explicit images of sexual activity – unless they can be exceptionally justified by context and the work is not a 'sex work' as defined below. In the case of videos and DVDs, which may be more accessible to younger viewers, intervention may be more frequent. For the same reason, and because of the different way in which they are experienced, the Board may take a more precautionary approach in the case of those digital games which are covered by the Video Recordings Act. </li></ul>
  11. 11. PG13 <ul><li>Vigilance on issues of harm and age appropriateness is also evident in the Board’s treatment of a number of blockbuster Hollywood cinema films which had received a PG-13 classification (cautioning parents but allowing unrestricted access for children of any age ) in the USA. Cloverfield , Disturbia and I Am Legend all featured extended periods of intense violent threat and moments of horror which the Board’s large consultation exercises suggest go beyond what most members of the UK public would consider appropriate for children younger than fifteen. In each case, the Board’s own judgement was that the films were likely to be disturbing to many younger children – a judgement tested and confirmed by the Advisory Panel on Children’s Viewing in respect of I Am Legend , and by the Consultative Council in respect of Disturbia . In each case, the distributor request for a ‘12A’ classification was refused and the films were all classified ‘15’. </li></ul>
  12. 12. The Dark Knight
  13. 13. Senior MPs have criticised the British Board of Film Classification's decision to allow young children to see the new Batman film, The Dark Knight. In a letter in the Times today, Iain Duncan Smith, the former Conservative leader, said he was &quot;astonished&quot; that the BBFC did not give the film a 15 certificate, which would stop children under the age of 15 from viewing it. Keith Vaz, the Labour chairman of the home affairs committee, has also said that the film should have been a 15. Instead the BBFC made it a 12A, meaning that children under the age of 12 can see it if accompanied by an adult. Duncan Smith decided to speak out after taking his 15-year-old daughter to see the film, starring Christian Bale and Heath Ledger, at the weekend. &quot;Unlike past Batman films where the villains were somewhat surreal and comical figures, Heath Ledger's Joker is a brilliantly acted but very credible psychopathic killer, who extols the use of knives to kill and disfigure his victims, during a reign of urban terrorism, laced with torture,&quot; Duncan Smith wrote. &quot;It is a relentlessly violent film, filled with dark themes, and as I left I wondered what the board could possibly have been thinking. There is no way that a parent could have been guided by the classification and realised what they were about to see.&quot; Duncan Smith said he enjoyed the film and thought it was well-made. But he thought the BBFC had &quot;caved in to commercial pressures&quot;.
  14. 14. This is England <ul><li>From the opposite view point, we received a number of requests for our classification decisions to be lowered. Shane Meadows’ powerful anti-racist drama, This is England , prompted eight impassioned calls for the ‘18’, awarded to it for its combination of very strong, racially abusive language and racially motivated violence, to be reduced to ‘15’. All believed the film to be of significant educational value in tackling racism, and argued that teenagers should be able to see the film. </li></ul>
  15. 15. Targeting
  16. 16. Targeting <ul><li>Why do films target specific audiences? </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Generate maximum revenue (it’s no good having a film with a teenage subject matter and an 18 certificate). </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Appeal to the biggest audience possible. </li></ul></ul><ul><li>How do they do it? </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Themes and issues that are raised (eg youth pictures, black and Asian identities). </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Methods of advertising and marketing (place and type). </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>The certificate they ‘intend’ to gain. </li></ul></ul>
  17. 17. Past Question <ul><li>Discuss the issues raised by an institution’s need to target specific audiences within the British film industry . </li></ul>British film in general… Working Title… Certificates… Gender… Age… Nationality Regionality Why do they need to do it? To make sure it is in the right number of cinemas in the right areas…to make money…to generate interest…
  18. 18. How do films target audiences according to… <ul><li>Certificates </li></ul><ul><li>Gender </li></ul><ul><li>Age </li></ul><ul><li>Nationality </li></ul><ul><li>Regionality </li></ul><ul><li>Ethnicity </li></ul><ul><li>Give examples of British films and studios in your responses! </li></ul>

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