Successfully reported this slideshow.
We use your LinkedIn profile and activity data to personalize ads and to show you more relevant ads. You can change your ad preferences anytime.
                                                              
 
 
	 
 EUROPEAN COURSE IN ENTREPRENEURSHIP FOR THE CREATIV...
                                                              
 
 
	 
 EUROPEAN COURSE IN ENTREPRENEURSHIP FOR THE CREATIV...
         
 
 
 EUROP
 
 
PES
 
Macr
make
There
Techn
attrac
collec
also t
 

 
                     
 
PEAN COURS
 
 
 
 ...
                                                              
 
 
	 
 EUROPEAN COURSE IN ENTREPRENEURSHIP FOR THE CREATIV...
         
 
 
 EUROP
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Mark
launc
strate
vision
impo
                     
 
PEAN COURS
ket players f
...
         
 
 
 EUROP
 
 
SW
The  S
facto
of his
This 
objec
and W
relati


 

 

 
 
 
                     
 
PEAN CO...
         
 
 
 EUROP
 
 
 
 
Ident
steps
the p
how t
 
 
 
                     
 
PEAN COURS
tify Market 
s, and it is al...
                                                              
 
 
	 
 EUROPEAN COURSE IN ENTREPRENEURSHIP FOR THE CREATIV...
         
 
 
 EUROP
 
 
Por
 
Mich
 
Mich
 
 
 
 

 
                     
 
PEAN COURS
rters five
ael Porter ha
ael Por...
                                                              
 
 
	 
 EUROPEAN COURSE IN ENTREPRENEURSHIP FOR THE CREATIV...
         
 
 
 EUROP
 
Spon
altern
same
draw
an ex
the re
cond
form 
 
Place
great
is a p
in  th
chann
who 
time 
pene
 
 ...
         
 
 
 EUROP
 
relev
does
comp
 
 
Ans
 
Every
and 
strat
 

 

 
                     
 
PEAN COURS
vant to mar...
                                                              
 
 
	 
 EUROPEAN COURSE IN ENTREPRENEURSHIP FOR THE CREATIV...
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in …5
×

Subject Module - Elective CIAKL II - Class 06

172 views

Published on

Subject Module - Elective CIAKL II - Class 06

Published in: Business
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

Subject Module - Elective CIAKL II - Class 06

  1. 1.                                                                       EUROPEAN COURSE IN ENTREPRENEURSHIP FOR THE CREATIVE INDUSTRIES  1        ANALYSING THE OPPORTUNITY
  2. 2.                                                                       EUROPEAN COURSE IN ENTREPRENEURSHIP FOR THE CREATIVE INDUSTRIES  2      Analysing the opportunity  Sources:    Howard  H.  Stevenson  and  David  E.  Gumpert,  “The  Heart  of  Entrepreneurship”, HBR 1985   Francois Colbert, “Entrepreneurship and Leadership in Marketing and Arts”, International Journal of Arts Management, Vol6, Number 1, 2003  Michael Porter, “Competitive Strategy ‐‐ Techniques for Analysing Industries and Competitors”, The Free Press, 1980     Opportunistic, creative and innovative    The first step is to identify the opportunity, which entails an external (or market) orientation  rather than an internal (or resource) orientation. The promoter type is constantly attuned to  environmental changes that may suggest a favorable chance, while the trustee type wants to  preserve resources and reacts defensively to possible threats to deplete them. Entrepreneurs  are not just opportunistic; they are also creative and innovative. The entrepreneur does not  necessarily want to break new ground but perhaps just to remix old ideas to make a seemingly  new  application.  Many  of  today’s  fledgling  microcomputer  and  software  companies,  for  example,  are  merely  altering  existing  technology  slightly  or  repackaging  it  to  accommodate  newly perceived market segments.    External pressures For the entrepreneurial mentality external pressures stimulate opportunity  recognition. These pressures include rapid changes in:   Technology,  which  opens  new  doors  and  closes  others.  The  minicomputer  posed  problems for those producers that failed to perceive the change quickly.    Consumer  economics,  which  alters  both  the  ability  and  willingness  to  pay  for  new  products  and  services.  The  sharp  rise  in  energy  costs  during  the  mid‐1970s  made  popular  the  wood  burning  stove  and  chain  saw,  and  spawned  the  solar  energy  industry, among others. But these same pressures set back those huge sectors of our  industrial economy that thrived on the belief in cheap energy forever.   Social values, which define new styles and standards of living. The 1980s interest in  physical  fitness  opened  up  markets  for  special  clothing,  “natural”  food,  workout  centers, and other businesses.   Political  action  and  regulatory  standards,  which  affect  competition.  Deregulation  of  airlines and telecommunications has sparked opportunities for assorted new products  and services while at the same time disrupting the economics of truckers, airlines, and  many concerns in other sectors.       
  3. 3.                EUROP     PES   Macr make There Techn attrac collec also t                              PEAN COURS         STEL  ro Analysis u e  a  market  efore, the en nological  En ctiveness of  ct a set of in to select the  Political f who  dep strategic  include a and envir in the eco or  be  pr provide, a                              SE IN ENTRE using PESTE analysis  to ntrepreneur  nvironment  the market, nformation t most attrac factors Gove end  for  exa areas  in  a  c areas such as ronmental la onomy, it’s i rovided,  and and find how            EPRENEURSH L From an e o  identify  po could use a  and  Legal  , according t that allows h tive markets ernments ha mple  ‐  the  country.  The s trade restr aws. To ident mportant an d  those  tha w and to wha HIP FOR THE  existing busi otential  bar technique c analysis,  t to macro iss him to make s for its imple ave great inf health,  educ e  political  fa rictions, tarif tify how and nalyze which t  the  gover at degree thi CREATIVE IN ness idea, t rriers  and  o called PESTE to  identify  ues. Using t e strategic d ementation. fluence on th cation,  cultu actors  define ffs, tax polic d to what deg  goods and s rnment  have is is attractiv Source: H NDUSTRIES    he entrepre opportunities L – Political,  and  define his tool the  ecisions for  he economy  ure,  infrastru e  the  politica cy, labor and gree a gover services they en’t  strategi ve to implem oward H. Steve neur will ne s  in  the  m  Economic, S e  the  degre entrepreneu his business of a nation, uctures  and  al  stability,  d commercia rnment inter y wants to pr ic  interests  ment  a busine enson  3  eed to  arket.  Social,  ee  of  ur can  s, and  , from  other  which  al law,  rvenes  rovide  in  to  ess. 
  4. 4.                                                                       EUROPEAN COURSE IN ENTREPRENEURSHIP FOR THE CREATIVE INDUSTRIES  4     Economic factors To determinate how economic is growing, considering the inflation  rate, the exchange and interest rates and other economic factors that  have major impacts on how businesses operate and make decisions. Since all business  need capital to work, all costs of capital will determinate how business could grow or  expand, and all economic factors work together as force that affecting business trade  and the prices to the final costumers, because the exchange rates affect the costs of  exporting goods and the supply and price of imported goods.     Social factors To identify social trends, culture environments that affect the demand,  including the wellness and health consciousness, age distribution, population growth,  active people rate, employment and careers, the consciousness and the commitment  of  people  to  the  state  and  the  government.  It  is  also  important  know  the  social  structure, the different life styles, and the trends of consumption.     Technological factors They have large impact in the macro tendencies, with a great  impact  in  the  trends  of  consumption,  but  also  in  the  production  efficiency,  in  the  development of new products that could emerge new companies with new products  that  becomes  from  R&D  activity.  It  is  also  important  identify  the  rate  of  the  importance the technological evolution in the markets and in the business sector of  our interest, since technological shifts can affect costs, quality, new trends and lead to  innovation.    Furthermore, it is also important determinate what is the state of art of the technology  in the business sector, and how important is to follow the tendency, and if it is really  determinant for the success for the company and to the costumers.     Environmental factors Great importance in the markets in nowadays, because people  and  consumers  developed  a  global  concern  about  the  environment,  and  that  conscientious determinate how they make their consumption. The concerns about the  ecological  and  environmental  aspects  such  as  the  climate  change,  the  weather,  climate,  and,  which  may  especially  affect  industries  such  as  farming,  insurance,  tourism, water and waste management, and all industries that may be affected or may  affect  the  environment,  with  pollutions  activities,  with  a  large  impact  on  the  awareness  of  the  potential  impacts  of  climate  change  is  affecting  how  companies  operate, which products they offer, and considering the governmental policies, how it  determinate the creating of new markets and diminishing or destroying existing ones.     Legal factors How the markets operate, and have a large impact in many companies. In  many  businesses  it  is  necessary  licenses  to  operate,  and  in  some  markets  the  commercial activity is highly regulated by laws. Therefore, in these         cases it influences its production costs, the way how the companies can offer the products  to the market, and the demand for its products.       
  5. 5.                EUROP                       Mark launc strate vision impo                         PEAN COURS ket players f ch  a  new  pr egic perspec n of the mar rtant inform                        SE IN ENTRE framework T roduct  or  se ctive of most ket and is a  mation to deli            EPRENEURSH To take decis ervice,  it  is  i t important a resume to ta ineate a stra HIP FOR THE  sions and cre mportant  h actors in the ake in consid ategy.  CREATIVE IN eate a strate ave  a  globa e market. Th deration the  NDUSTRIES  egy to get in  l  view  of  th he next graph vital informa   the market, he  market,  w hic, is a simp ation to gath 5  , or to  with  a  plified  hering 
  6. 6.                EUROP     SW The  S facto of his This  objec and W relati                                       PEAN COURS OT  SWOT  analy rs in the ma s business, a tool    is  he ctives of the  Weaknesses  ive to the ma Strengths over othe   Weaknes relative t Opportun the envir Threats:  business                         SE IN ENTRE ysis  This  an arket. The en nd also iden lpful  to  ana organization are relative arket.  s: characteri ers  sses (or Limit o others  nities: extern onment  external elem or project             EPRENEURSH nother  popu ntrepreneur  tify the main alyze  the  m n. When usin e to the orga istics of the  tations): are nal chances t ments  in  th HIP FOR THE  lar  techniqu should try to n Opportuni arket,  to  de ng this tool  anization/bu business, o e characterist to improve p he  environm CREATIVE IN ue  for  evalu o identify th ities and Thr efine  the  st it is importa siness and O or project te tics that plac performance ment  that  c NDUSTRIES  uating  existi e Strengths, reats that he rategic  plan nt to consid Opportunitie am that give ce the team  e (e.g. make  could  cause  ng  element , and Weakn e will have to nning,  and  t der that  Stre es and Threa e it an adva at a disadva greater prof   trouble  fo 6  s  and  nesses  o face.  to  set  engths  ts are  antage  antage  fits) in  or  the   
  7. 7.                EUROP         Ident steps the p how t                               PEAN COURS tify Market  s, and it is als purpose of id the Business                        SE IN ENTRE Opportuniti so a simplifie dentifying ga s Model Defi            EPRENEURSH ies.  The grap ed view of h aps between nition may b HIP FOR THE    phic helps t ow the entre n supply and be developed CREATIVE IN o identify  M epreneur sh d demand, a d.  NDUSTRIES  Market Oppo ould develop nd to have  ortunities in  p his analysi a first perce   7  three  s with  eption 
  8. 8.                                                                       EUROPEAN COURSE IN ENTREPRENEURSHIP FOR THE CREATIVE INDUSTRIES  8        Strategy and implementation  Sources:    Robert  M. Grant,  “Contemporary Strategy  Analysis”  Fifht  Edition,  Blackwell  Publishing, 2005   Michael Porter, “Competitive Strategy ‐‐ Techniques for Analysing Industries  and Competitors”, The Free Press, 1980   Francois Colbert, “Entrepreneurship and Leadership in Marketing and Arts”,  International Journal of Arts Management, Vol6, Number 1, 2003   Philip  Kotler  and  Kevin  Keller,  “Marketing  Management”,  12th   edition,  Prentice Hall, 2006   Regis McKenna, “Marketing Is Everything”, Harvard Business Review, 1991   Kevin Roberts, “Lovemarks, The Future Beyond Brands”, Powerhouse Books,  205      Tools for strategic planning    Business strategy is a long term plan designed to achieve a particular goal or a set of goals.   The  entrepreneur  should  gather  as  much  information  as  possible  about  external  conditions  and opportunities, as well as internal attributes, so that his decisions are valuable, feasible and  maximise value. Porter’s five forces model determines attractiveness of market segments the  company is interested in, and helps determining what should be its competitive advantages to  reach the objectives.      The  Ansoff  matrix  is  a  valuable  tool  that  helps  decision  making  for  growth  strategy.  Implementing strategy means firstly defining the marketing mix also known as the  4P’s ‐ which  products,  where  they  should  be  placed,  at  what  price  and  how  they  should  be  promoted.  Secondly, to develop or to create the most efficiently organized internal processes, attributes  and resources required to achieve the purposed objectives. This includes investment decisions,  namely the acquisition of fixed assets, as shown in the next chapter.       
  9. 9.                EUROP     Por   Mich   Mich                                    PEAN COURS rters five ael Porter ha ael Porter –  Threat  o and  stro unattract are high.  to compe                        SE IN ENTRE  forces m as identified  5 Forces Mo f  intense  se ng  competit tive. Even m Probability o ete.             EPRENEURSH model  five forces t odel  egment  rival tors  means  ore so when of price wars HIP FOR THE  that determi lry:  The  pre a  threat  fo n it is declin s or advertis CREATIVE IN ne the attrac evious  existe or  the  busin ing, if fixed  sing battles i NDUSTRIES  ctiveness of  ence  of  num ess  and  ma costs are hig s high and m the market:  merous,  aggr akes  the  seg gh or exit ba makes it expe 9  essive  gment  arriers  ensive   
  10. 10.                                                                       EUROPEAN COURSE IN ENTREPRENEURSHIP FOR THE CREATIVE INDUSTRIES  10     Threat of new entrants: The most attractive segment is one in which entry barriers are  high and exit barriers are low. There will be few new entrants and many leaving the  segment. The worst case scenario is when entry barriers are low and exit barriers are  high since firms enter with a good economy and face high costs if they want to leave  during a bad economy.     Threat  of  substitute  products:  A  segment  is  unattractive  when  there  are  actual  or  potential substitutes for the product. Price competition is high and profits are low.     Threat of buyers’ power: When the buyers have many alternatives and switching costs  are low, their bargaining power rises and the segment is unattractive.     Threat  of  suppliers’  power:  Reduction  of  market  attractiveness  is  also  caused  by  powerful, concentrated and organized suppliers which can easily raise prices or reduce  quantity supplied, or when the suppliers’ input is important and switching costs are  high.    However,  when  we  are  analysing  the  creative  industries  market,  it’s  important  to  consider  other forces in the market, since this is a market with some specificities, and is depending of  many interlocutors and stakeholders.     Like Michael Porter has identified 5 big forces in the market, for general markets, the same  process inspired a new perspective and market analysis. Considering multiple intervenients in  creative industries projects, it seems very important to include others groups of stakeholders  as forces into the market, once that can be determinate to the project success. They usually  are a concern to project promoters and they are referenced as strategic elements, and that’s  why  it’s  possible  and  important  to  define  a  strategy  of  how  to  involve  all  of  them  in  the  development and implementation of the project.    Beyond  suppliers  and  buyers  power,  threats  of  substitute  products  and  threats  of  new  entrants, we have also for the  creative industries, as stakeholders: the investors, the state,  sponsors and the place agents, all of them as forces in the market.     Investors – usually, the initial investment in creative industries projects is quite large which  leads  to  seeking  intensive  capital,  where  investors  will  be  an  answer  and  an  alternative  to  finance the projects, instead of using banks. At the same time, they also have great power and  the possibility to make pressure.    State ‐ can be seen as a partner, as an investor, as a promoter or even a direct customer to  certain cultural and economic activities, which may involve the creative industries. Through its  ministries and its social responsibility network, can also be seen as a network of contacts and  as a distribution channel for products and services.    That  is  why  we  may  consider  the  State  as  a  force  in  the  market,  because  through  specific  policies, it can finance or subsidize some areas and sectors of the economy that could make a  greater or lesser impact in production and create opportunities to the creative industries.   
  11. 11.                EUROP   Spon altern same draw an ex the re cond form    Place great is a p in  th chann who  time  pene     Using e.g.                          PEAN COURS sors  –  Since natives to fin e time provid w a strategic  xclusive, or t eason why t itions which to commun e Agents – E t distribution principal part e  market  an nel we must are in conta as the sales tration in th g this mode informatio                        SE IN ENTRE e  most  of  th nance the pr ding high vis approach to they don’t w they must be  could have  icate their b very comme n channel. In t of success. nd  for  big  p t choose and act with the  s force. Wor e market and el provides  n  about  co            EPRENEURSH he  projects  rojects, and  sibility to spo o the sponso want to be sh e seen as a f great impac rands, and ra ercial activity n competitive  Considering players  in  th d at the sam market. The rking with th d a better in informatio ompetitors, HIP FOR THE  needs  inten the sponsor onsors and t ors, consider haring the sa force in the  ct in the mar arely as a ph y needs a st e markets th g that some  he  market,  i me time, ide ey must be s he right plac ternationaliz on about wh ,  suppliers  CREATIVE IN sive  capital, rship can be  their brands. ing that all o ame space w market, bec rket. The size hilanthropic v rong sales d he access to  channels be it  is  very  im entify the im een as strat ce agents, w zation proce hat Porter c and  custo NDUSTRIES    the  promo strategically . In all case,  of them will  with their co cause they ca e matters an view.  epartment w the right dis ecome exclus mportant  to  portance of egic partner we will also  ss.  calls marke omers.  This oters  need  to y used, and  it is importa want to be  ompetitors. T an require c nd they see  which also n stribution ch sive to big b determine  f the place a r, and most o promote a b et attractive s  informati 11  o  find  at the  ant to  alone  This is  ertain  it as a  need a  hannel  brands  which  agents  of the  better    eness,  on  is 
  12. 12.                EUROP   relev does comp     Ans   Every and  strat                                 PEAN COURS vant to mar s the entrep petitive adv soff matr y business  growth  str egy  Market  existing  competi Market  example                        SE IN ENTRE rket segme preneur hav vantages, sk rix  aims profit rategy.  The  penetratio product.  tor’s exit or developme e in internat            EPRENEURSH ent/niche en ve to be to kills and res t which usu Ansoff  ma on:  Increase Possible  ca r increase in ent:  Using  tional expan HIP FOR THE  ntry decisio o fight again sources they ually means atrix  helps  e  market  s ase  scenar n demand. an  existin nsion   CREATIVE IN on and det nst their riv y should ha s a sustaina defining  m share  in  an rios  are  ta ng  product  NDUSTRIES  ermine how valry and po ve to overc able efficie market  and  n  existing  m aking  adva in  a  new  w well prep ower, e.g. w come difficu ent manage product  gr market  wit ntage  of  market,  a 12  pared  which  ulties.   ement  rowth    th  an  some  as  for 
  13. 13.                                                                       EUROPEAN COURSE IN ENTREPRENEURSHIP FOR THE CREATIVE INDUSTRIES  13     Product development: Using an existing gap in the market to develop and offer  a new product in an existing market. Customer oriented companies usually take  customers suggestions and develop products to satisfy their needs.     Product/Market  diversification:  New  product  in  a  new  market,  as  in,  for  example, entering a new segment with a new product. It could be the case of  vertical  integration  where  the  corporation  buys  a  suppliers’  company  hence  entering in a new market. 

×