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Module - Soft Skills Reloaded

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Module - Soft Skills Reloaded

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Module - Soft Skills Reloaded

  1. 1. ©SílviaMachado2016 1
  2. 2. ©SílviaMachado2016 SOFT SKILLS RELOADED by Sílvia Machado January 2016 COURSE CONTENT SUPPORTED BY [Insert your logo here]
  3. 3. ©SílviaMachado2016 A person can have the greatest idea in the world – completely different and novel – but if that person can’t convince enough other people, it doesn’t matter. Gregory Berns Neuroscientist, entrepreneur, professor and author
  4. 4. ©SílviaMachado2016 4 At the end of this course you will be able to...  know what are soft skills  understand the importance of soft skills in implementing and managing a business  know what are the most important stakeholders involved in an entrepreneur initiative and their expectations  communicate effectively in business environments  manage some technics in order to persuade people  apply tested design principles to presentation documents  improve presentation skills  understand what emotional intelligence is, its benefits and challenges  understand what empathy is and why is it important in an entrepreneurship context  recognize different styles of leadership  know the principles for negotiating effectively  improve your networking capabilities
  5. 5. ©SílviaMachado2016 5 Course’s structure 1 Introduction 2 Communication & persuasion 3 Presentations that matter 4 Emotional intelligence 5 Leadership 6 Negotiation 7 Networking
  6. 6. ©SílviaMachado2016 7 Recommended reading I/II Alison Wood Brooks (2015): Emotion and the Art of Negotiation. Harvard Business Review, December. Anthony L Suchman (2006): A New Theoretical Foundation for Relationship-centered Care: Complex Responsive Processes of Relating. Journal of General Internal Medicine, Jan; 21(Suppl 1): S40–S44 Bill Bonnstetter (2012): New Research: The Skills That Make an Entrepreneur. Harvard Business Review, December. Bill Bonnstetter (2013): The Skills Most Entrepreneurs Lack. Harvard Business Review, April. Carmine Gallo (2010): The Presentation Secrets of Steve Jobs: How to Be Insanely Great in Front of Any Audience. New York: McGraw-Hill. Daniel Goleman (2000): Leadership That Gets Results. Harvard Business Review, March-April. Daniel Goleman (2004): What Makes a Leader? Harvard Business Review, January. Daniel Goleman (2013): Focus: The Hidden Driver of Excellence. New York: HarperCollins Publishers. Deepak Malhotra (2015): Control the Negotiation Before It Begins. Harvard Business Review, December. Garr Reynolds (2008): Presentation Zen: Simple Ideas on Presentation Design and Delivery. Berkeley: New Riders.
  7. 7. ©SílviaMachado2016 8 Recommended reading II/II Garr Reynolds (2011): The Naked Presenter: Delivering Powerful Presentations With or Without Slides. Berkeley: New Riders. Harvard Business Essentials: Negotiation (2003). Boston: Harvard Business School Publishing. Harvard Business Press Pocket Mentor: Persuading People (2008). Boston: Harvard Business School Publishing. Nancy Duarte (2010): Resonate: Present Visual Stories that Transform Audiences. New Jersey: John Wiley & Sons. Nick Wreden (2002): How to Make Your Case in 30 Seconds or Less. Harvard Management Communication Letter, January. Robin Williams (2008): The Non-Designer’s Design Book: 3rd edition. Berkeley: Peachpit Press. Stephen Kosslyn (2007): Clear and to the Point: 8 Psychological Principles for Compelling PowerPoint Presentations. New York: Oxford University Press. Stewart Friedman (2008): Total Leadership: Be a Better Leader, Have a Richer Life. Boston: Harvard Business School Publishing. Travis Bradberry and Jean Greaves (2009): Emotional Intelligence 2.0. San Diego: TalentSmart.
  8. 8. ©SílviaMachado2016 9 Time for discussion Questions on the lecturer on module description
  9. 9. ©SílviaMachado2016 10 THANK YOU FOR QUESTIONS OR COMMENTS PLEASE CONTACT Sílvia Machado profsilviamachado@gmail.com FOR YOUR ATTENTION
  10. 10. ©SílviaMachado2016 INTRODUCTION Module: Soft Skills Reloaded Lecturer: Sílvia Machado Date: January 2016 COURSE CONTENT SUPPORTED BY
  11. 11. ©SílviaMachado2016 A person can have the greatest idea in the world – completely different and novel – but if that person can’t convince enough other people, it doesn’t matter. Gregory Berns Neuroscientist, entrepreneur, professor and author
  12. 12. ©SílviaMachado2016 13 At the end of this lecture you will be able to...  Know what are soft skills  Understand the importance of soft skills in implementing and managing a business  Know what are the most important stakeholders involved in an entrepreneur initiative and their expectations
  13. 13. ©SílviaMachado2016 14 Typically, what do fund managers expect from new businesses? Two flops Seven Also-rans One star From any 10 investments B u t t h e y a r e o n l y l o o k i n g f o r w i n n e r s .
  14. 14. ©SílviaMachado2016 15 It’s not easy to be a successful entrepreneur… Startup failure rates range from 75%to 95%, and some are even higher failed to return investors’ money75% fell short of goals like revenue or break-even 95% Source: study by Shikhar Ghosh, Harvard Business School: more than 2.000 fledgling enterprises that received at least $1 million in venture capital funding from 2004 through 2010
  15. 15. ©SílviaMachado2016 Failure is the norm. Shikhar Ghosh Lecturer at Harvard BS and top executive at some eight technology-based start-ups
  16. 16. ©SílviaMachado2016 17 What are venture capitalists looking for when reading a business plan? For the idea 33% For the management 33% For the money 34% Source: Venture Capital Report, UK
  17. 17. ©SílviaMachado2016 18 Before making the leap to a startup, ask these questions How much funding does the company have? How does the firm’s product or service fit into its industry? What business experience do the principals bring to the table? What’s the growth plan for the business 3, 6, 9, and 12 months out? Is there an exit strategy?
  18. 18. ©SílviaMachado2016 19 Ingredients for building successful businesses Behaviors AttitudesValues
  19. 19. ©SílviaMachado2016 Entrepreneurs tend to be single-minded with their strategies — wanting the venture to be all about the technology or all about the sales, without taking time to form a balanced plan. Shikhar Ghosh
  20. 20. ©SílviaMachado2016 21 The skills that make an entrepreneur Source: Target Training International, Harvard Business Review
  21. 21. ©SílviaMachado2016 22 The qualities that serial entrepreneurs lack most Source: Target Training International, Harvard Business Review
  22. 22. ©SílviaMachado2016 23 THANK YOU FOR QUESTIONS OR COMMENTS PLEASE CONTACT Sílvia Machado profsilviamachado@gmail.com FOR YOUR ATTENTION
  23. 23. ©SílviaMachado2016 COMMUNICATION & PERSUASION Module: Soft Skills Reloaded Lecturer: Sílvia Machado Date: January 2016 COURSE CONTENT SUPPORTED BY
  24. 24. ©SílviaMachado2016 Be distinct… or extinct. Tom Peters
  25. 25. ©SílviaMachado2016 26 An entrepreneur needs to be insanely great in front of any audience Steve Jobs in Macworld Expo 2007
  26. 26. ©SílviaMachado2016 27 At the end of this lecture you will be able to...  communicate effectively in business environments  manage some technics in order to persuade people
  27. 27. ©SílviaMachado2016 28 Communication defined Communication is the process of exchanging ideas, facts or opinions by two or more persons.
  28. 28. ©SílviaMachado2016 29 The communication process Communicator •Who? Message •Say what? Medium •Through which channel? Receiver •To whom? Effect •Impact
  29. 29. ©SílviaMachado2016 30 Good communicators listen and observeSuccessfulcommunication Listening Observing Speaking Speech Writing Non-verbal
  30. 30. ©SílviaMachado2016 31 Non-verbal signals reflect attitudes and responses Non-verbal communication Facial expression Body language
  31. 31. ©SílviaMachado2016 32 ALMOST 80% OF OUR COMMUNICATIONS ARE EXPRESSED THROUGH BODY LANGUAGE
  32. 32. ©SílviaMachado2016 33 Ten ways to use body language for effective communication Control the emotions behind it Open stance Arms by the side Open hands Good posture Shoulders back Lean forward Relaxed face Smile Soft eyes
  33. 33. ©SílviaMachado2016 34 Most people respond to non-verbal communication signals Behaviour Reason Circumstances Responses Leaning forward Concentration Increased emphasis Important meeting Negotiation Make points clearly State your own case Leaning back Taking time to think Inviting expansion Looking for conclusion After a proposition/ explanation Towards end of meeting Allow silence thought Wait for others to speak firs Clasping both hands behind neck Extreme confidence Relaxation Non-threatening situations In charge of situations Maintain openness of situation Be positive about your own case Straight gaze No head movement Failing attention Dislike what is communicated Lack of cooperation Disputed occasions Unwelcome instructions Ask for reactions/feelings Ask for suggestions Narrowing eyes Disapproval Disbelief Dislike Expects to challenge Patience may be short Allows expression of opinion Shows that you acknowledge difference Give your reasons Source: Adapted from Communication Skills, 1996, by Carter Wendy
  34. 34. ©SílviaMachado2016 35 Abusiness owner uses communication skills all the time Pitching an idea to potential investors Dealing with potential advertisers Teaching users how to use your product or service Interviewing a potential candidate for a job in your company Working out a new contract with a group of lawyers Calling your employee’s attention Negotiating more favourable terms with your suppliers Proposing a new web design to your developers
  35. 35. ©SílviaMachado2016 36 Four ways not to persuade They attempt to make their case with an up-front, hard sell Howexecutivesfailatpersuasion They resist compromise They think the secret of persuasion lies in presenting great arguments They assume persuasion is a one-shot effort Source: The Necessary Art of Persuasion, by Jay A. Conger, HBR May– June 1998.
  36. 36. ©SílviaMachado2016 Like power, persuasion can be a force for enormous good in an organization. It can pull people together, move ideas forward, galvanize change, and forge constructive solutions. To do all that, however, people must understand persuasion for what it is – not convincing and selling, but learning and negotiating. Jay A. Conger Neuroscientist, entrepreneur, professor and author
  37. 37. ©SílviaMachado2016 38
  38. 38. ©SílviaMachado2016 39 Time for discussion Questions & answers
  39. 39. ©SílviaMachado2016 40 THANK YOU FOR QUESTIONS OR COMMENTS PLEASE CONTACT Sílvia Machado profsilviamachado@gmail.com FOR YOUR ATTENTION
  40. 40. ©SílviaMachado2016 PRESENTATIONS THAT MATTER Module: Soft Skills Reloaded Lecturer: Sílvia Machado Date: January 2016 COURSE CONTENT SUPPORTED BY
  41. 41. ©SílviaMachado2016 To express yourself as you are is the most important thing. Shunryu Suzuki
  42. 42. ©SílviaMachado2016 43 At the end of this lecture you will be able to...  apply tested design principles to presentation documents  improve presentation skills
  43. 43. ©SílviaMachado2016 44 Building presentations that communicate a message effectively 1 Prepare to speak to a particular audience 2 Show and tell 3 Plan in advance how you will direct the audience’s attention 4 Don’t lose your basic message by providing either too much or too little information 5 Prepare your slides to function as your notes; don’t rely on your memory 6 Use the full range of communi- cation options 7 Build in breaks that allow the audience to “come up for air” 8 Prepare for questions
  44. 44. ©SílviaMachado2016 45 A successful talk is a little miracle: people see the world differently afterward.
  45. 45. ©SílviaMachado2016 46 Introduction Start with a bang Build on the audience’s knowledge and concerns when you explain why your topic is important Define the topic by providing a concrete example Tell the audience what you want them to conclude Provide a road map 1 2 3 4 5
  46. 46. ©SílviaMachado2016 47 The body of the presentation
  47. 47. ©SílviaMachado2016 48 D O N ’ T P R O J E C T T O O M U C H E G O
  48. 48. ©SílviaMachado2016 49 The wrap-up Repeat the opening outline Prepare text and graphics to emphasize your conclusions Set up a snappy ending
  49. 49. ©SílviaMachado2016 50 Delivering the presentation 1 Speak to – not at – your audience 2 Face the audience 3 Don’t rush it 4 Know what you can skip 5 Respond to questions
  50. 50. ©SílviaMachado2016 51 Stories fascinate us.
  51. 51. ©SílviaMachado2016 52 From the principles to the point Principle of relevance Principle of appropriate knowledge Principle of salience Principle of discriminability Principle of perceptual organization Principle of compatibility Principle of informative changes Principle of capacity limitations
  52. 52. ©SílviaMachado2016 53 Chris Anderson curator of TED
  53. 53. ©SílviaMachado2016 54 10 ways to ruin a presentation Common mistakes that TED advises its speakers to avoid
  54. 54. ©SílviaMachado2016 55 10 ways to ruin a presentation Take a really long time to explain what your talk is about. Speak slowly and dramatically. Why talk when you can orate? Make sure you subtly let everyone know how important you are. Refer to your book repeatedly. Even better, quote yourself from it. Cram your slides with numerous text bullet points and multiple fonts. 1 2 3 4 5
  55. 55. ©SílviaMachado2016 56 10 ways to ruin a presentation Use lots of unexplained technical jargon to make yourself sound smart. Speak at great length about the history of your organization. Don’t bother rehearsing to check how long your talk is running. Sound as if you’re reciting your talk from memory. Never, ever make eye contact with anyone in the audience. 6 7 8 9 10
  56. 56. ©SílviaMachado2016 57 Presentations rise or fall on the quality of the idea, the narrative, and the passion of the speaker.
  57. 57. ©SílviaMachado2016 58 It’s about substance, not speaking style or multimedia pyrotechnics.
  58. 58. ©SílviaMachado2016 59 Nerves are not a disaster. The audience expects you to be nervous.
  59. 59. ©SílviaMachado2016 60 Presentations in action Individual presentations of business plans already developed
  60. 60. ©SílviaMachado2016 61 Some web references www.ted.com (TED Talks: amazing presentations) http://on.ted.com/Turere (Richard Turere’s presentation) www.youtube.com/watch?v=c_m2F_ph_uU (Steve Jobs: 2007 iPhone presentation) www.youtube.com/watch?v=_KN-5zmvjAo (Steve Jobs introduces iPad - 2010) www.colourlovers.com (colour combinations) www.shutterstock.com + www.istockphoto.com (royalty-free images)
  61. 61. ©SílviaMachado2016 62 THANK YOU FOR QUESTIONS OR COMMENTS PLEASE CONTACT Sílvia Machado profsilviamachado@gmail.com FOR YOUR ATTENTION
  62. 62. ©SílviaMachado2016 EMOTIONAL INTELLIGENCE Module: Soft Skills Reloaded Lecturer: Sílvia Machado Date: January 2016 COURSE CONTENT SUPPORTED BY
  63. 63. ©SílviaMachado2016 Many people with IQs of 160 work for people with IQs of 100, if the former have poor intrapersonal intelligence and the latter have a high one. Daniel Goleman
  64. 64. ©SílviaMachado2016 65 At the end of this lecture you will be able to...  Understand what emotional intelligence is, its benefits and challenges  Understand what empathy is and why is it important in an entrepreneurship context
  65. 65. ©SílviaMachado2016 66 Emotional Intelligence defined Daniel Goleman in Harvard Business Review, March-April 2000 The ability to manage ourselves and our relationships effectively.
  66. 66. ©SílviaMachado2016 67 Emotional Intelligence consists of four fundamental capabilities Daniel Goleman in Harvard Business Review, March-April 2000 Self- awareness Self- management Social awareness Social skill
  67. 67. ©SílviaMachado2016 68 Each capability is composed of specific sets of competencies Daniel Goleman in Harvard Business Review, March-April 2000
  68. 68. ©SílviaMachado2016 69 Defusing an emotionally charged conversation with a colleague By Anthony L Suchman (2006): A New Theoretical Foundation for Relationship-centered Care: Complex Responsive Processes of Relating. Journal of General Internal Medicine, Jan. PEARLS:Usingrelationship-buildingstatementsfor makingthe conversation moreproductive Partnership • “I really want to work on this with you.” • “I bet we can figure this out together.” Empathy • “I can feel your enthusiasm as you talk.” • “I can hear your concern.” Acknowledgement • “You clearly put a lot of work into this.” • “You invested in this, and it shows.” Respect • “I’ve always appreciated your creativity.” • “There’s no doubt you know a lot about this.” Legitimation • “This would be hard for anyone.” • “Who wouldn’t be worried about something like this?” Support • “I’d like to help you with this.” • “I want to see you succeed.”
  69. 69. ©SílviaMachado2016 70 Technology is causing us more stress (*) author of The 4-Hour Workweek: Escape 9-5, Live Anywhere, and Join the New Rich. Tips from Tim Ferriss * To avoidnegativefeelings associatedwith technology, take stepsto controlit Turn off your devices for shorts periods of time • Your life won't implode, but expect a period of withdrawal or anxiety. Leave your mobile phone and PDA at home one day a week • Maybe Saturdays. Devise a "not-to-do list" • For instance, don't check email before 10 a.m. Attempt to set some limits. Accept the fact you can't respond to 500 emails a day • A big part is getting over yourself. You don't have a superhuman email checking ability. Learn moderation • Make a note of how many times a day you check your email, or you scan your social networking sites. Realize when you have a problem, and make a practice of not being a slave to your devices.
  70. 70. ©SílviaMachado2016 71 8 habits that help you stay calm, cool, and collected in any storm By Christopher Bergland, endurance athlete, coach, author, and political activist. Harnessingthe vagusnerve and keepingit engagedto create grace underpressure Visualize the Vagus Nerve Practice, practice, practice Create flow by balancing skill and challenge Reframe priorities and values Use neuroplasticity to re-wire habits of positive thinking Seek daily physicality Anxiety is contagious: avoid anxious people Foster loving & kindness
  71. 71. ©SílviaMachado2016 72 Time for discussion Questions & answers
  72. 72. ©SílviaMachado2016 73 THANK YOU FOR QUESTIONS OR COMMENTS PLEASE CONTACT Sílvia Machado profsilviamachado@gmail.com FOR YOUR ATTENTION
  73. 73. ©SílviaMachado2016 LEADERSHIP Module: Soft Skills Reloaded Lecturer: Sílvia Machado Date: January 2016 COURSE CONTENT SUPPORTED BY
  74. 74. ©SílviaMachado2016 Leadership is ultimately about creating a way for people to contribute to making something extraordinary happen. Alan Keith, Lucas Digital
  75. 75. ©SílviaMachado2016 76 At the end of this lecture you will be able to...  Recognize different styles of leadership
  76. 76. ©SílviaMachado2016 77 Great Man Theory suggests that the capacity for leadership is inborn Characteristics Charisma Confidence Intelligence HonestyIntegrity Creativity Social skills
  77. 77. ©SílviaMachado2016 78 Behavioral theories state that great leaders are made, not born Country Club Manager Team Manager Midle-of-Road Manager Focuses on people's needs, building relationships Focuses on building participation and support for a shared purpose Focuses on efficiency of tasks and perations Focuses on minimum effort to get work done Concern for Production HighLow ConcernforPeopleHighLow Focuses on balancing work output and moraleImpoverished Manager Authority- Obedience Manager Blake & Mouton's Leadership Grid
  78. 78. ©SílviaMachado2016 79 Behavioral theories state that great leaders are made, not born Country Club Manager Team Manager Midle-of-Road Manager Focuses on people's needs, building relationships Focuses on building participation and support for a shared purpose Focuses on efficiency of tasks and perations Focuses on minimum effort to get work done Concern for Production HighLow ConcernforPeopleHighLow Focuses on balancing work output and moraleImpoverished Manager Authority- Obedience Manager Blake & Mouton's Leadership Grid
  79. 79. ©SílviaMachado2016 80 Contingency theories say that the environment determines which style of leadership is best suited for the situation Coercive • Coercive leaders demand immediate compliance Authoritative • Authoritative leaders mobilize people toward a vision Affiliative • Affiliative leaders create emotional bonds and harmony Democratic • Democratic leaders build consensus through participation Pacesetting • Pacesetting leaders expect excellence and self- direction Coaching • Coaching leaders develop people for the future
  80. 80. ©SílviaMachado2016 81 According to this theory, no leadership style is best in all situations Daniel Goleman in Harvard Business Review, March-April 2000
  81. 81. ©SílviaMachado2016 82 According to this theory, no leadership style is best in all situations Daniel Goleman in Harvard Business Review, March-April 2000
  82. 82. ©SílviaMachado2016 83 “There is no leadership. Only effective management.” Source: Vasconcellos e Sá, Jorge (2012); There is no leadership: Only effective management; Editora Vida Económica Knowledge and skills Temperament Innate Innate and can be developed + developed – innate + developed – innate
  83. 83. ©SílviaMachado2016 84 Time for discussion Questions & answers
  84. 84. ©SílviaMachado2016 85 THANK YOU FOR QUESTIONS OR COMMENTS PLEASE CONTACT Sílvia Machado profsilviamachado@gmail.com FOR YOUR ATTENTION
  85. 85. ©SílviaMachado2016 NEGOTIATION Module: Soft Skills Reloaded Lecturer: Sílvia Machado Date: January 2016 COURSE CONTENT SUPPORTED BY
  86. 86. ©SílviaMachado2016 In business, you don't get what you deserve, you get what you negotiate. Chester L Karrass
  87. 87. ©SílviaMachado2016 88 At the end of this lecture you will be able to...  know the principles for negotiating effectively
  88. 88. ©SílviaMachado2016 89 Fundamental framework for a successful negotiation The alternative to negotiation The minimum threshold for a negotiated deal How flexible a party is willing to be, and what trade-offs it is willing to make
  89. 89. ©SílviaMachado2016 90 How to establish that framework BATNA Reservation price ZOPA
  90. 90. ©SílviaMachado2016 91 The preferred course of action in the absence of a deal est lternative o a egotiated greement
  91. 91. ©SílviaMachado2016 92 Improving your position Improve your BATNA Identify the other side’s BATNA Weaken the other party’s BATNA
  92. 92. ©SílviaMachado2016 93 The reservation price The walk-away The least favourable point at which one will accept a deal
  93. 93. ©SílviaMachado2016 94 The set of agreements that potentially satisfy both parties one f ossible greement
  94. 94. ©SílviaMachado2016 95 ZOPAillustrated ZOPA €250K €275K Buyer’s reservation priceSeller’s reservation price
  95. 95. ©SílviaMachado2016 96 Tactics for getting the other side to negotiate Offer incentives Put a price on the status quo Enlist support
  96. 96. ©SílviaMachado2016 97 Negotiation in action Role-play simulation
  97. 97. ©SílviaMachado2016 98 THANK YOU FOR QUESTIONS OR COMMENTS PLEASE CONTACT Sílvia Machado profsilviamachado@gmail.com FOR YOUR ATTENTION
  98. 98. ©SílviaMachado2016 NETWORKING Module: Soft Skills Reloaded Lecturer: Sílvia Machado Date: January 2016 COURSE CONTENT SUPPORTED BY © Sílvia Machado 2016
  99. 99. ©SílviaMachado2016 Never waste a lunch. Tom Peters © Sílvia Machado 2016
  100. 100. ©SílviaMachado2016 10 1 At the end of this lecture you will be able to...  improve your networking capabilities ©SílviaMachado2016
  101. 101. ©SílviaMachado2016 10 2 Tips to help improve networking skills Get off your computer Forget you’re “working” Set goals Mind your manners Elevator pitches still matter Play to your weaknesses Don’t hang onto business cards ©SílviaMachado2016
  102. 102. ©SílviaMachado2016 10 3 We have 20 lunches per month. 240 per year. 20 opportunities to start new relationships; 20 opportunities to nurture or extend old relationships; 20 opportunities to patch up frayed relationships; 20 opportunities to "take a freak to lunch"—and learn something new; 20 opportunities to test an idea with a potential recruit-alliance partner; 20 opportunities to get to know someone in another function; 20 opportunities to ... pursue or make a sale ... to gain a convert- champion for your idea or project. By Tom Peters ©SílviaMachado2016
  103. 103. ©SílviaMachado2016 10 4 Time for discussion Questions & answers ©SílviaMachado2016
  104. 104. ©SílviaMachado2016 10 5 THANK YOU FOR QUESTIONS OR COMMENTS PLEASE CONTACT Sílvia Machado profsilviamachado@gmail.com FOR YOUR ATTENTION © Sílvia Machado 2016

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