UCLU Poker Training    24 November
The 4 principles of poker• The strength principle•   In general, you want to bet your strong hands, check your middling ha...
• The aggression principle•   In general, aggression (betting and raising) is better than passivity (checking and    calli...
• The betting principle•   In general a successful bet must be able to do one of 3 things: force a better hand    to fold,...
Characteristics of turn play                           After the flop   After the turnLow pair v high pair       10%      ...
Characteristics of turn play•   An advantage is more significant•   Being ahead on the turn gives you a significantly bigg...
Live v online games•   The differences•   Size of raise.•   In online games the size of raises is generally 2-3.5bb’s. In ...
Hand rankings and groupings•   David Sklansky and Mason Malmuth assigned each hand to a group, and proposed all hands in t...
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24.11.11 pokerpresentation

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For the third presentation Alex will talk about checking, betting, rasing,and folding, as well as how the turn card (4th street) changes things and how to adapt to this. I will also mention on the differences between live and online play and hand rankings and groupings (very important) and anything else that I deem important when writing the presentation.

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24.11.11 pokerpresentation

  1. 1. UCLU Poker Training 24 November
  2. 2. The 4 principles of poker• The strength principle• In general, you want to bet your strong hands, check your middling hands and fold or bluff with your weakest hands.• 1. Obviously you want to bet your strong hands when you’re most likely to win.• 2. You want to check middling hands because its hard to make any money when you bet such a hand. Better hands are likely to call a raise, while weaker ones will fold. This is why betting/raising for information is so horrible. E.g I raised middle pair to find out if I’m good here.• 3. Folding weak hands is obvious. Choosing your weakest hands to bluff might not be so obvious, but the basic idea is that if you bluff with a weak hand and the bluff works you’ve gained some value from a hand that had none. If you pick a hand with some value (middle pair) for bluffing but then get raised off it you’ve lost value with a hand that had value to begin with (the proof lies in ‘The Mathematics of Poker’ by Bill Chen and Jerrod Ankenman)
  3. 3. • The aggression principle• In general, aggression (betting and raising) is better than passivity (checking and calling)• Aggressive actions give you two ways to win the pot: your opponent can fold to your bet, or they can call your bet and you win in a showdown.• Passive actions only give you one way of winning, at showdown.• Two ways to win are better than one.• We refer to the value you gain when your opponent folds as your folding equity – abbreviated as FE, and exploiting FE is key to winning at No Limit Hold’em
  4. 4. • The betting principle• In general a successful bet must be able to do one of 3 things: force a better hand to fold, force a worse hand to call, or cause a drawing hand to draw at unfavourable odds.• A bet can only make money in 3 ways. If you chase a better hand out of the pot, you have won with a hand you should have lost. If you have gotten a weaker hand to call, you’ve gotten more money into a pot you rate to win. If a hand is drawing to beat you, and you make that hand pay, you’ve also made money. If you don’t think you can accomplish any of these things, you shouldn’t be betting.• The deception principle• Never do anything all of the time.• In order to be successful at poker, you have to keep your opponents guessing about what you have and what your bets mean. In order to keep them guessing you have to make sure all of your actions have multiple interpretations.
  5. 5. Characteristics of turn play After the flop After the turnLow pair v high pair 10% 5%Two over cards v underpair 24% 13%Two low cards v two high 26% 14%cardsFlush draw v high pair 38% 20%Open ended straight draw 34% 18%v high pair
  6. 6. Characteristics of turn play• An advantage is more significant• Being ahead on the turn gives you a significantly bigger advantage than being ahead on the flop. With only one card to come, any hand that trails on the turn has about half the chance of drawing out as on the flop.• It’s hard to get the pot odds to draw• We can see that on the table on the other slide. If you know you’re trailing any reasonably sized bet will price you out unless you have significant implied odds. It is often correct to fold flush draws, straight draws etc.• If on a draw the texture of the board determines your willingness to call a turn bet• For instance you have AdJd on a board of 7d6h5d2d. The arrival of a 4th diamond will probably kill any river action.• But if your hand is 7d8d on a board of Ah9s6d2s. The arrival of a ten or a five on the river won’t be taken very seriously. If you’re up against a set of aces or nines, you’re likely to take his entire stack. When you’re drawing to a straight you need to pay attention to flush draws as they can limit your implied odds. Your opponent may think you hit a flush and refuse to pay you off.• Value bets have higher equity• Since your opponent has less chance of catching up, it follows that turn bets make more money and are stronger. However, you may want to check the turn if you believe• Pot commitment starts to play a role• If you made large bets (roughly pot sized) both pre flop and on the flop another large bet on the turn generally commits you to the flop. This is especially true if you started off with 100bb’s. At this stage you need to make a decision whether you are comfortable playing with the hand for stacks.
  7. 7. Live v online games• The differences• Size of raise.• In online games the size of raises is generally 2-3.5bb’s. In live games (especially £1/1 and £1/£2) the size of raises can be 5-15bb’s. This clearly changes the type of hands you should play. Suited connectors, small pocket pairs and suited Aces shouldn’t be played as you don’t have the implied odds to play them to such large raises.• Many more limped pots• Players live seem to call the BB a lot more than online where people usually raise.• Pots are often multiway• In online games it is rare to see more than 3 players to a pot. Usually it is two and occasionally 4 (very rarely). In live games due to a lot of limping you can often see pots contested with 4-6 players. This increases the value of hands that thrive on implied offs like suited connectors and small pocket pairs. However, with 5 players in a pot, you really need to flop a very strong hand to continue.• Players call down a lot more with more marginal holdings• Players seem more than happy to put money in with 2nd pair etc over several streets. They also call a lot with a ton of crap, just to see a turn card. Players also love to see a ton of flops (most are recreational and are there to see flops and get lucky).• Stack sizes can be deeper• In online cash games the standard buy in is 100bb’s. In live games it is not unusual to buy in for 200bb’s and more. Players can often be sitting at the table with 500bb’s+. This obviously changes which hands you are willing to commit your stack with. For instance if you are 300bb’s deep and you have 33 on a flop of 379r, getting it all in here is not optimal. The deeper you get the better hand you need to commit all your chips.
  8. 8. Hand rankings and groupings• David Sklansky and Mason Malmuth assigned each hand to a group, and proposed all hands in the group could normally be played similarly. Stronger starting hands are identified by a lower number. Hands without a number are the weakest starting hands. As a general rule, books on Texas holdem present hand strengths on the assumption of a nine or ten person table. The table below illustrates these groupings with those corresponding to off-suit cards below the main diagonal and those for cards of the same suit above.
  9. 9. Questions?

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