GC1: Job Roles in the Production Arts Industry
Within the Production Arts Industry, there are many different roles that ar...
Liaising with the director, stage personnel and other technical departments, e.g. costume,
lighting, sound.
And making sur...
Sound Designer to have the appropriate sounds and also the director’s requests and intentions. They
need to be present wit...
The Front of Manager also has a Front of House team who they need to communicate to and to
supervise. They need to be able...
Costume Mistress
The Costume Mistress is responsible for supervising all wardrobe related activities and issues during
the...
Draw up complete properties lists, and set up and label the properties tables, which are used
during production.
Organisat...
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Gc1 job roles in the production roles

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Gc1 job roles in the production roles

  1. 1. GC1: Job Roles in the Production Arts Industry Within the Production Arts Industry, there are many different roles that are very important when managing a show. There is a hierarchal structure that shows the different relationships between the varieties of roles within the production arts company and helps to understand their importance of and their different responsibilities within the team to help the show run smoothly and efficiently. This is the Hierarchy Structure for In the Heights Musical: Stage Manager The Stage Manager is at the top of the Hierarchy because it has to look over everyone to make sure everything is under control and has to coordinate all aspects of the company to ensure the successful delivery of the performance. This involves a variety of activities such as organising the production and coordinating communication between the various other roles. It is also about working with all the different managers, actors and technicians as well as liaising with the front of house staff and director. Therefore people management and organisation skills are highly important within this role. The Stage Manager needs to have good understanding of both the technical and artistic elements of the performance so they can ensure it is delivered exactly to the director’s requirements. They have to be involved in the rehearsals through to the live performance where they will be required to deal with any emergencies or issues that may occur before and during the performance. The different Roles and responsibilities will vary depending of the size of the performance, but the tasks will typically be the same. They will include: Distributing all information and responsibilities to the other managers and departments. Supervising over the whole productions and when the set, lighting and sound are installed, and when all the equipment is removed. Ensuring the company’s welfare and maintaining a good working knowledge of all relevant health and safety legislation and good working practice. Running the backstage and onstage areas during performances. Stage Manager Assistant Costume AS Manager Assistant Props Props Mistress Costume Mistress DS Manager FOH Manager Lighting Designer Sound Operator Sound Designer Lighting Operator
  2. 2. Liaising with the director, stage personnel and other technical departments, e.g. costume, lighting, sound. And making sure the whole performance in successful and professionally. A Stage Manager is the one who has overall responsibilities for the stage management and the smooth execution of the production. Once the house opens for a performance, the stage manager controls all aspects of the performance by calling the cues for all transitions and acting as communications for the cast and crew. Within the Stage Management team there will also be a “Deputy Stage Manager” and “Assistant Stage Manger”. These roles are important because they will help with any problems that occur that the head Stage Manager cannot do efficiently. Sound Designer A Sound Designer is very important within the Production Arts Industry. It is responsible for the process of specifying, acquiring, manipulating and generating audio elements. The sound designer will also have to work with the director to make sure it is reaching the directors requirements and also communicate with the production crew to define the preferred atmosphere and achieve the overall performance goal. The Sound Designer also will create appropriate sound effects and also alter the sound so the correct impact is achieved. The roles, responsibilitiesand skills of a sound designer will include: Operating a variety of digital equipment to create and mix sounds. Be able to communicate with director and crew members and also the lighting operator to help achieve common sound goals. Manipulating, Generating, Designing and acquiring all sound elements. Have creativity to be able to imagine different effects. Ability to work under pressure and the changing of deadlines and requirements. Sound designers first read the script and research the play to learn its plot and characters as well as its period, mood and contextual elements. Additionally, the designer searches the script for information specific to the sound design, such as on stage noise for example the ringing of a telephone as well as offstage noises such as trains or storms. The designer also looks for scenes in which sounds could be used to support the mood of the play. Often referred to as atmospheric sounds, these may not be specified in the script but can be added to help the audience understand the emotional and physical environments of the play. After designing all the sound elements of a performance they will them communicate with the Sound operator who will bring the ideas and designs to life. Sound Operator The sound operator is underneath the Sound Designer within the hierarchal structure of the Production Arts Industry. Their main concern is the recording, manipulation, mixing and producing of the sound. They have to communicate with the director and crew of the production but mainly the
  3. 3. Sound Designer to have the appropriate sounds and also the director’s requests and intentions. They need to be present within all rehearsals and tech/dress runs to make sure the performance runs smoothly and efficiently and operator of the final show. The roles, responsibilities and skills will include: Checking all equipment runs smoothly and is present and ready. Communication skills with Sound Designer, crew members and director. Manipulating, Generating, Mixing and producing all sound elements. Pay close attention in case they are required to move position of any equipment. Ability to anticipate and think on the feet, so that in case anything goes wrong during the performance they can get the performance back on track. Good timing to make sure the lighting and sound cues are in time with each other and are correct cues for the show. FOH Manager The Front of House Manager has many different duties and responsibilities for example: setting up the front area of the venue; making sure the customers have the best experience; organising refreshments; the paying system and also the overall organisation of the event. They will be present on the night to oversee the people attending that night’s performance and make sure the venue facilities are running smoothly. They will also help run the show at the start and end and if there are any intervals within the production to sell refreshments and sell tickets and generally help the audience with any questions or queries or complaints they may have. This role is the first point of contact with the public so you need to be very sociable and talkative. The Front of House Manager will also communicate with the Marketing Team to help with the sale and advertising of the performance. Their main roles, responsibilities and skills will include: Ensure all performances and events are appropriately staffed with the correct Front of House team. Monitor the staff’s work performance, timekeeping and general discipline and implement staff dress code. Take responsibility for all FOH sales, including the ordering of programmes and stock and the supervision of sales systems and stock control. Implement procedures for cashing up and the use of floats and ensure that the security of cash and stock is protected. Work closely with the Stage Manager and the Front of House Team to ensure the theatre and all events operate smoothly and efficiently. Work with the marketing department regarding customer care to implement monitoring data and user surveys for audience events. Refreshments are all in stock. Communications skills are important whilst communicating with the customer.
  4. 4. The Front of Manager also has a Front of House team who they need to communicate to and to supervise. They need to be able to give clear directions to this team so that they all have specific jobs roles within the performance. Lighting Designer A Lighting Designer is very important within the Production Arts Industry. It is responsible for the process of specifying, acquiring, designing and generating all lighting elements. The lighting designer will also have to work with the director to make sure it is reaching the directors requirements and also communicate with the production crew to define the preferred atmosphere and achieve the overall performance goal. The roles, responsibilities and skills of a lighting designer will include: Operating a variety of digital equipment to create different lighting states. Be able to communicate with director and crew members and also the sound operator to help achieve common sound goals. Generating, Designing and acquiring all lighting effects. Have creativity to be able to imagine different effects. Ability to work under pressure and the changing of deadlines and requirements. The Lighting designer looks for scenes in which lighting could be used to support the mood of the play. Often referred to as atmospheric lighting, these may not be specified in the script but can be added to help the audience understand the emotional and physical environments of the play. After designing all the lighting elements of a performance they will them communicate with the lighting operator who will bring the ideas and designs to life. Lighting Operator The lighting operator is underneath the Lighting Designer within the hierarchal structure of the Production Arts Industry. Their main concern is the producing of the lights. They have to communicate with the director and crew of the production but mainly the Lighting Designer to have the appropriate lighting effects and states and also the director’s requests and intentions. They need to be present within all rehearsals and tech/dress runs to make sure the performance runs smoothly and efficiently and operator of the final show. The roles, responsibilities and skills will include: Checking all equipment runs smoothly and is present and ready. Communication skills with Lighting Designer, crew members and director. Producing all Lighting effects and states Pay close attention in case they are required to move position of any equipment. Ability to anticipate and think on the feet, so that in case anything goes wrong during the performance they can get the performance back on track. Good timing to make sure the lighting and sound cues are in time with each other and are correct cues for the show.
  5. 5. Costume Mistress The Costume Mistress is responsible for supervising all wardrobe related activities and issues during the course of a production. The costume Mistress is responsible for all dressers working on a production. The Costume Mistress is in constant communication with thestage manager and sometimes the director to make sure the costume is correct at all time. They help to coordinate and assign dressers to specific performers and tasks and help determine where and how costume changes are made. Generally, the wardrobe supervisor decides whether a point in a production requires a quick change backstage, or if there is time for a normal change in the dressing room. All dressers report directly to the Costume Mistress with any problems, or questions and they act as primary liaison between dressers, the costumer, and stage management. The wardrobe supervisor's primary responsibilities include: The care and proper maintenance of all costumes, shoes, undergarments, hats and costume related personal props such as gloves, jewellery, parasols, fans and pocket books. To ensure the proper labelling, hanging, storage and preset of all costume pieces. To create and execute a proper cleaning schedule for all garments, ensuring that laundry and dry cleaning are done on a regular basis between performances. They also coordinate the regular changing of dress shields, the application of garment freshening sprays and providing clean undergarments to the performers. To ensure that all costumes are properly pressed or steamed prior to each performance. The wardrobe supervisor also regularly inventories and inspects all costumes and coordinates all costume repairs. At the end of a production run, the wardrobe supervisor oversees all aspects of the costume strike. In the case of rented costumes. Organisation Skills are key. Props Mistress The Props Mistress is responsible for purchasing, acquiring and/or manufacturing any props needed for a production. They also need to ensure all props are present at the start of each show and maintain present and correct throughout all the productions. The props mistress also works with other members of the production team, managing the physical appearance of the stage or set, for example they might work with the director and set designer to help make sure everything is correct. Overall the Props Mistress is responsible for the set up and organization of the props. They also ensure that selected props suit the production and overall design, and that they accurately reflect the production's time period and culture. The Props Mistress oversees the staff, and the smooth running, of the Props Department, and make sure it is working to a high standards of accuracy and detail. The Props Mistress responsibilities include: Break down the script, and determine what props are required.
  6. 6. Draw up complete properties lists, and set up and label the properties tables, which are used during production. Organisation Skills are key. Allocate budgets to purchase, hire or create props, and plan and manage these budgets. The work may include planning, designing and adapting any special hand or set props required by the production. They attend all rehearsals, in order to note props' placement and use, and any change in action that affects props. The care, maintenance and possible operation of all props The Props Mistress usually oversees the work of a number of people, and must therefore have excellent leadership, management and motivational skills. As Heads of Department they should be able to cope with pressure. Also they should have excellent practical, organisational, planning and time management abilities are vital, as are written and oral communication and presentation skills.

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