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2009 Passive House Presentation

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This slideshow was put together for a lecture at the University of MInnesota. It talks about PH for new construction and Deep Energy Reduction Retrofit projects.

The slideshow contains a lot of full-screen images but no subtitles, therefore omitting some of the information which would have been given verbally during the presentation.

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2009 Passive House Presentation

  1. 1. Certified Passive House™ and the related Logo is a certification mark owned by the Passive House Institute US | PHIUS and is used by permission.
  2. 2. Passive House An introduction by Tim Eian, Certified Passive House Consultant Certified Passive House™ and the related Logo is a certification mark owned by the Passive House Institute US | PHIUS and is used by permission.
  3. 3. Origins & Motivation
  4. 4. Conservation = Resource Illinois Lo-Cal House, 1974
  5. 5. Passive Solar Designs
  6. 6. Back to the Future
  7. 7. First Superinsulated Building Envelope Saskatchewan Conservation House Saskatoon, Canada in 1977
  8. 8. What happened?
  9. 9. The Focus Shifted
  10. 10. The Focus Shifted
  11. 11. Passive House Founders Prof. Bo Adamson Dr. Wolfgang Feist Sweden Germany
  12. 12. First Passive House & PHI 1990 1996: PHI - Passiv Haus Institut Source: Passiv Haus Institut
  13. 13. “Passivhaus” Passive House Building Energy Standard A rigorous, voluntary building energy standard focusing on highest energy efficiency and quality of life at low operating cost.
  14. 14. Passive Solar design vs. Passive House standard
  15. 15. Passive Solar design vs. Passive House standard PASSIVE SOLAR PASSIVE HOUSE Building design concept Certified building energy standard “Unlimited” energy use Limited energy use per square foot and year Utilization of solar heat gains and internal heat Utilization of solar heat gains (passive) gains (passive) Utilization of shading devices to control solar Utilizes shading devices and glazing to control heat gains solar heat gains Use of thermal mass for absorption and storage Use of superinsulation for retention of space of solar energy conditioning energy Use of thermal mass for time-release of space Use of ventilation system for distribution and conditioning energy (passive convection/radiation recovery of heating energy or active distribution with mechanical system)
  16. 16. Passive Solar design vs. Passive House standard PASSIVE SOLAR PASSIVE HOUSE Building design concept Certified building energy standard “Unlimited” energy use Limited energy use per square foot and year Utilization of solar heat gains and internal heat Utilization of solar heat gains (passive) gains (passive) Utilization of shading devices to control solar Utilizes shading devices and glazing to control heat gains solar heat gains Use of thermal mass for absorption and storage Use of superinsulation for retention of space of solar energy conditioning energy Use of thermal mass for time-release of space Use of ventilation system for distribution and conditioning energy (passive convection/radiation recovery of heating energy or active distribution with mechanical system)
  17. 17. Passive Solar design vs. Passive House standard PASSIVE SOLAR PASSIVE HOUSE Building design concept Certified building energy standard “Unlimited” energy use Limited energy use per square foot and year Utilization of solar heat gains and internal heat Utilization of solar heat gains (passive) gains (passive) Utilization of shading devices to control solar Utilizes shading devices and glazing to control heat gains solar heat gains Use of thermal mass for absorption and storage Use of superinsulation for retention of space of solar energy conditioning energy Use of thermal mass for time-release of space Use of ventilation system for distribution and conditioning energy (passive convection/radiation recovery of heating energy or active distribution with mechanical system)
  18. 18. Passive Solar design vs. Passive House standard PASSIVE SOLAR PASSIVE HOUSE Building design concept Certified building energy standard “Unlimited” energy use Limited energy use per square foot and year Utilization of solar heat gains and internal heat Utilization of solar heat gains (passive) gains (passive) Utilization of shading devices to control solar Utilizes shading devices and glazing to control heat gains solar heat gains Use of thermal mass for absorption and storage Use of superinsulation for retention of space of solar energy conditioning energy Use of thermal mass for time-release of space Use of ventilation system for distribution and conditioning energy (passive convection/radiation recovery of heating energy or active distribution with mechanical system)
  19. 19. Passive Solar design vs. Passive House standard PASSIVE SOLAR PASSIVE HOUSE Building design concept Certified building energy standard “Unlimited” energy use Limited energy use per square foot and year Utilization of solar heat gains and internal heat Utilization of solar heat gains (passive) gains (passive) Utilization of shading devices to control solar Utilizes shading devices and glazing to control heat gains solar heat gains Use of thermal mass for absorption and storage Use of superinsulation for retention of space of solar energy conditioning energy Use of thermal mass for time-release of space Use of ventilation system for distribution and conditioning energy (passive convection/radiation recovery of heating energy or active distribution with mechanical system)
  20. 20. Passive Solar design vs. Passive House standard PASSIVE SOLAR PASSIVE HOUSE Building design concept Certified building energy standard “Unlimited” energy use Limited energy use per square foot and year Utilization of solar heat gains and internal heat Utilization of solar heat gains (passive) gains (passive) Utilization of shading devices to control solar Utilizes shading devices and glazing to control heat gains solar heat gains Use of thermal mass for absorption and storage Use of superinsulation for retention of space of solar energy conditioning energy Use of thermal mass for time-release of space Use of ventilation system for distribution and conditioning energy (passive convection/radiation recovery of heating energy or active distribution with mechanical system)
  21. 21. Passive Solar design vs. Passive House standard PASSIVE SOLAR PASSIVE HOUSE Building design concept Certified building energy standard “Unlimited” energy use Limited energy use per square foot and year Utilization of solar heat gains and internal heat Utilization of solar heat gains (passive) gains (passive) Utilization of shading devices to control solar Utilizes shading devices and glazing to control heat gains solar heat gains Use of thermal mass for absorption and storage Use of superinsulation for retention of space of solar energy conditioning energy Use of thermal mass for time-release of space Use of ventilation system for distribution and conditioning energy (passive convection/radiation recovery of heating energy or active distribution with mechanical system)
  22. 22. Basic Design Principle
  23. 23. Basic Design Principle First: Minimize losses
  24. 24. Basic Design Principle First: Minimize losses Then: Maximize gains
  25. 25. Active vs. Passive “Active” Heating “Passive” System with System 10 kW+ small post heater 1 kW 85 - 400 max. 15 kWh/m2 kWh/m2 Building Stock Passive House Source: Krapmeier & Drössler 2001
  26. 26. Economy Capitalized costs in Euro Elimination of traditional heating system Ultra low-energy building Low-energy building Passive House Space-Conditioning Energy in kWh/(m2 a) “Gas-Mileage for Buildings” Source: Krapmeier & Drössler 2001
  27. 27. Energy Source: Krapmeier & Drössler 2001 *) compared to standard-practice code-compliant construction
  28. 28. Energy 90%+ reduction in space-conditioning energy consumption* 75%+ reduction in source-energy consumption* Source: Krapmeier & Drössler 2001 *) compared to standard-practice code-compliant construction
  29. 29. Environment
  30. 30. Health
  31. 31. Comfort
  32. 32. Durability
  33. 33. Conscience
  34. 34. Value
  35. 35. Quality of Life
  36. 36. Paradigm Shifts • INCREMENTALISM IS DEATH! • LEAPFROG • SYSTEM VS. COMPONENT
  37. 37. Paradigm Shifts • INCREMENTALISM IS DEATH! • LEAPFROG • SYSTEM VS. COMPONENT
  38. 38. Paradigm Shifts • INCREMENTALISM IS DEATH! • LEAPFROG • SYSTEM VS. COMPONENT
  39. 39. How does it work? Source: Krapmeier & Dressler 2001
  40. 40. Superinsulated Envelope Source: Waltjen 2007
  41. 41. Advanced Windows & Doors Source: Waltjen 2007
  42. 42. Advanced Windows & Doors Image Source: PHI Protokollband Nr. 24 (2003)
  43. 43. Thermal Bridge Free Details Source: Waltjen 2007
  44. 44. Air-Tightness
  45. 45. Air-Tightness n50 ≤ 0.6 ACH
  46. 46. Energy Recovery Ventilation
  47. 47. Passive Solar Heat Gains
  48. 48. Internal Heat Gains Copyright: Sony Pictures
  49. 49. Backup Heater
  50. 50. Backup Heater
  51. 51. Optional Renewables Design: Gumprecht Architekten
  52. 52. High-Efficiency Appliances Source: Ecodrain Source: Sun Frost
  53. 53. “Gas-Mileage for Buildings”
  54. 54. “Gas-Mileage for Buildings” Energy per square foot and year
  55. 55. Space-Conditioning Energy Energy used to heat or cool a building
  56. 56. Space-Conditioning Energy Energy used to heat or cool a building ≤ 4,750 Btu/(sf yr)
  57. 57. Source Energy Energy made at the provider (source)
  58. 58. Source Energy Energy made at the provider (source) ≤ 11.1 kWh/(sf yr)
  59. 59. Close to Zero LEED
  60. 60. Close to Zero LEED Net Energy Positive
  61. 61. Energy Goals NET ZERO SITE ENERGY (ZEB U.S.), desirable minimum level Energy produced on site = energy consumed on site Grid-tied building
  62. 62. Energy Goals OFF-THE-GRID, expensive Energy produced on site = energy consumed on site Building is not tied to the grid
  63. 63. Energy Goals NET ZERO UTILITY BILL, sales-pitch level $-value of energy sold = $-value of energy purchased
  64. 64. Energy Goals NET ZERO SOURCE ENERGY, true zero energy level Energy produced on site = energy consumed at provider including energy content of raw materials, conversion and distribution
  65. 65. Energy Goals NET POSITIVE ENERGY (NPE): Energy produced on site > energy consumed on site
  66. 66. Energy Goals NET ZERO ENERGY EMISSIONS (ZEB ouside U.S.), sustainability level: CO2 offset on site ≥ CO2 generated in source energy production at provider to deliver site energy
  67. 67. Energy Goals SAVE-THE-PLANET LEVEL Net Zero Energy Emissions + Net Positive Energy
  68. 68. Save-the-planet house Design: MB Planungs GmbH
  69. 69. Save-the-planet house Design: MB Planungs GmbH Energy produced on site ≥ 3x energy consumed on site
  70. 70. Predictable Outcome & Quality Control
  71. 71. Predictable Outcome & Quality Control Passive House Planning Package (PHPP)
  72. 72. Predictable Outcome & Quality Control Passive House Planning Package (PHPP) • An Excel-based steady-state energy design program
  73. 73. Predictable Outcome & Quality Control Passive House Planning Package (PHPP) • An Excel-based steady-state energy design program • Extremely detailed
  74. 74. Predictable Outcome & Quality Control Passive House Planning Package (PHPP) • An Excel-based steady-state energy design program • Extremely detailed • Calculations are transparent and customizable
  75. 75. Predictable Outcome & Quality Control Passive House Planning Package (PHPP) • An Excel-based steady-state energy design program • Extremely detailed • Calculations are transparent and customizable • Field testing
  76. 76. Predictable Outcome & Quality Control Passive House Planning Package (PHPP) • An Excel-based steady-state energy design program • Extremely detailed • Calculations are transparent and customizable • Field testing • Site supervision by Passive House Consultant
  77. 77. Air-tight Construction Source: PHIUS
  78. 78. Think globally, Build locally.
  79. 79. Think globally, Build locally. Passive House Standard performance requirements are always the same, no matter where the building is built.
  80. 80. Think globally, Build locally. Passive House Standard performance requirements are always the same, no matter where the building is built. Climate zone and a building’s distinctive location impact the design significantly.
  81. 81. Think globally, Build locally. Passive House Standard performance requirements are always the same, no matter where the building is built. Climate zone and a building’s distinctive location impact the design significantly. Therefore, Passive Houses will look differently depending on where they are located.
  82. 82. Retrofits
  83. 83. Retrofits Yes, we can!
  84. 84. Retrofits Yes, we can! > Deep Energy Reduction Retrofits: DERR
  85. 85. Retrofits Yes, we can! > Deep Energy Reduction Retrofits: DERR 70%+ reduction of site energy consumption
  86. 86. Retrofits Yes, we can! > Deep Energy Reduction Retrofits: DERR 70%+ reduction of site energy consumption Significant CO2 reduction
  87. 87. Retrofits Yes, we can! > Deep Energy Reduction Retrofits: DERR 70%+ reduction of site energy consumption Significant CO2 reduction Tremendous nation-wide energy-savings potential for existing building stock
  88. 88. Retrofits Yes, we can! > Deep Energy Reduction Retrofits: DERR 70%+ reduction of site energy consumption Significant CO2 reduction Tremendous nation-wide energy-savings potential for existing building stock We can overcome energy obsolescence!
  89. 89. How does it work?
  90. 90. DERR - In a nutshell
  91. 91. DERR - In a nutshell • Assess viability of existing building and level of existing obsolescence (energy, siding, roofing, windows, etc.)
  92. 92. DERR - In a nutshell • Assess viability of existing building and level of existing obsolescence (energy, siding, roofing, windows, etc.) • Set energy goals (typ. 70%+ improvement over existing condition)
  93. 93. DERR - In a nutshell • Assess viability of existing building and level of existing obsolescence (energy, siding, roofing, windows, etc.) • Set energy goals (typ. 70%+ improvement over existing condition) • Assess moisture transfer through shell and design assemblies that will be air-tight but diffusion open
  94. 94. DERR - In a nutshell • Assess viability of existing building and level of existing obsolescence (energy, siding, roofing, windows, etc.) • Set energy goals (typ. 70%+ improvement over existing condition) • Assess moisture transfer through shell and design assemblies that will be air-tight but diffusion open • Demo and prepare existing building
  95. 95. DERR - In a nutshell • Assess viability of existing building and level of existing obsolescence (energy, siding, roofing, windows, etc.) • Set energy goals (typ. 70%+ improvement over existing condition) • Assess moisture transfer through shell and design assemblies that will be air-tight but diffusion open • Demo and prepare existing building • Establish air-tightness layer
  96. 96. DERR - In a nutshell • Assess viability of existing building and level of existing obsolescence (energy, siding, roofing, windows, etc.) • Set energy goals (typ. 70%+ improvement over existing condition) • Assess moisture transfer through shell and design assemblies that will be air-tight but diffusion open • Demo and prepare existing building • Establish air-tightness layer • Add (exterior) insulation package
  97. 97. DERR - In a nutshell • Assess viability of existing building and level of existing obsolescence (energy, siding, roofing, windows, etc.) • Set energy goals (typ. 70%+ improvement over existing condition) • Assess moisture transfer through shell and design assemblies that will be air-tight but diffusion open • Demo and prepare existing building • Establish air-tightness layer • Add (exterior) insulation package • Install new doors and windows
  98. 98. DERR - In a nutshell • Assess viability of existing building and level of existing obsolescence (energy, siding, roofing, windows, etc.) • Set energy goals (typ. 70%+ improvement over existing condition) • Assess moisture transfer through shell and design assemblies that will be air-tight but diffusion open • Demo and prepare existing building • Establish air-tightness layer • Add (exterior) insulation package • Install new doors and windows • Add heat-recovery ventilation system
  99. 99. DERR - In a nutshell • Assess viability of existing building and level of existing obsolescence (energy, siding, roofing, windows, etc.) • Set energy goals (typ. 70%+ improvement over existing condition) • Assess moisture transfer through shell and design assemblies that will be air-tight but diffusion open • Demo and prepare existing building • Establish air-tightness layer • Add (exterior) insulation package • Install new doors and windows • Add heat-recovery ventilation system • Adequately size mechanical system
  100. 100. DERR - In a nutshell • Assess viability of existing building and level of existing obsolescence (energy, siding, roofing, windows, etc.) • Set energy goals (typ. 70%+ improvement over existing condition) • Assess moisture transfer through shell and design assemblies that will be air-tight but diffusion open • Demo and prepare existing building • Establish air-tightness layer • Add (exterior) insulation package • Install new doors and windows • Add heat-recovery ventilation system • Adequately size mechanical system • Add renewable energy package as desired
  101. 101. Exterior insulation package
  102. 102. TE Studio & Passive House Building design for new construction, remodels, additions Energy optimizations, building analysis, consulting
  103. 103. beautiful, resource-efficient building design Tim Eian, assoc. AIA Certified Passive House Consultant TE Studio, Ltd. 3429 Benjamin St. NE Minneapolis, MN 55418 www.timeian.com 612-246-4670 tim@timeian.com Blog: www.timeian.com/blog Certified Passive House™ and the related Logo is a certification mark owned by the Passive House Institute US | PHIUS and is used by permission.
  104. 104. The Book
  105. 105. Resources • www.passivehouse.us • www.passiv.de • www.timeian.com/blog

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