Writing for  the web Privacy Copyright Copyright
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
<ul><li>Why is writing for the web important? </li></ul><ul><li>Reading from the  screen is different  to reading from pap...
<ul><li>Some key tips are: </li></ul><ul><li>Use short sentences and short paragraphs. </li></ul><ul><li>Use bullets or nu...
<ul><li>“…  Web pages have to employ  scannable text , using:  </li></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>highlighted  keywords  (hypertext...
<ul><li>What is copyright? </li></ul><ul><li>“ Overview of copyright legislation </li></ul><ul><li>Respect others' work – ...
<ul><li>Some key tips are: </li></ul><ul><li>Get permission from students, and parents before posting student work online....
<ul><li>A key resource: </li></ul><ul><li>Guidelines for Schools For the Online Publication of Student Images and Schoolwo...
<ul><li>What is creative commons? </li></ul><ul><li>Some authors think copyright law stifles creativity. </li></ul><ul><li...
<ul><li>Something to consider with Web 2.0 </li></ul><ul><li>Carefully read terms of use agreements when you create Web 2....
<ul><li>What is privacy? </li></ul><ul><li>“ Internet websites can be accessed by anyone with an online connection. Materi...
<ul><li>Some key tips are: </li></ul><ul><li>Get permission from students, and parents before posting student images onlin...
<ul><li>Something else to consider with Web 2.0 </li></ul><ul><li>Before you start to use Web 2.0 tools in the classroom, ...
<ul><li>Participation </li></ul><ul><li>Here are some ways you can participate on  www.time4online.org. nz  after viewing ...
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Writing for the web/Privacy/Copyright

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This presentation is for the Aspects to consider section of the Time4 Online Conference. It covers some brief scenarios, definitions and tips for the areas of writing for the web, copyright, and privacy. Presentation compiled by Sarah O'Sullivan.

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  • Writing for the web/Privacy/Copyright

    1. 1. Writing for the web Privacy Copyright Copyright
    2. 15. <ul><li>Why is writing for the web important? </li></ul><ul><li>Reading from the screen is different to reading from paper. </li></ul><ul><li>Web readers are scanners and clickers. </li></ul><ul><li>If you don’t get your message across quickly and clearly you will lose your reader. </li></ul>Writing for the web
    3. 16. <ul><li>Some key tips are: </li></ul><ul><li>Use short sentences and short paragraphs. </li></ul><ul><li>Use bullets or numbering. </li></ul><ul><li>Use consistent headings and subheadings. </li></ul><ul><li>Avoid jargon and waffle. </li></ul><ul><li>Use images and white space. </li></ul><ul><li>Highlight key words. </li></ul><ul><li>Find out more from: </li></ul><ul><li>Quality Web Content – McAlpine, R. Web writing guidelines backed by research </li></ul><ul><li>http://www.webpagecontent.com/arc_archive/156/5/ </li></ul>Writing for the web
    4. 17. <ul><li>“… Web pages have to employ scannable text , using: </li></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>highlighted keywords (hypertext links serve as one form of highlighting; typeface variations and color are others) </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>meaningful sub-headings (not &quot;clever&quot; ones) </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>bulleted lists </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>one idea per paragraph (users will skip over any additional ideas if they are not caught by the first few words in the paragraph) </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>the inverted pyramid style, starting with the conclusion </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>half the word count (or less) than conventional writing” </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><li>From: </li></ul><ul><li>Jakob Nielsen 's Alertbox for October 1, 1997: http://www.useit.com/alertbox/9710a.html </li></ul>Writing for the web
    5. 18. <ul><li>What is copyright? </li></ul><ul><li>“ Overview of copyright legislation </li></ul><ul><li>Respect others' work – have your work respected </li></ul><ul><li>It is a basic principle of copyright that the expression of an idea in an original work is legally protected by copyright as soon as it becomes 'recorded in material form' (viewable by others). </li></ul><ul><li>In other words, write it down, draw, record, or film it, and the original material is automatically protected by copyright. The author does not have to register the work to claim copyright in New Zealand – the act of putting the idea into a fixed format establishes copyright.” </li></ul><ul><li>Quoted from: Copyright in Schools website http://www.tki.org.nz/r/governance/copyright/what-is-copyright_e.php </li></ul>Copyright Copyright
    6. 19. <ul><li>Some key tips are: </li></ul><ul><li>Get permission from students, and parents before posting student work online. </li></ul><ul><li>Use original work, copyright free (or creative commons licensed), or seek permission. </li></ul><ul><li>Check terms of use agreements for Web 2.0 tools before you upload student work. </li></ul><ul><li>If you’re not sure, then don’t use it. </li></ul><ul><li>Find out more information from: http://www.tki.org.nz/r/governance/copyright/index_e.php </li></ul>Copyright Copyright
    7. 20. <ul><li>A key resource: </li></ul><ul><li>Guidelines for Schools For the Online Publication of Student Images and Schoolwork Learning Media item 12893. Schools need to exercise prudence, judgment and common sense before publishing students' material online. They should check whether they have consent and ensure that publication will not have legal consequences, does not defame, is not objectionable from a human rights point of view, and is not obscene. These guidelines for online publication advise schools on publishing student material and images. They also provide sample permission forms for obtaining appropriate consents for using student material online. The guidelines are also available as a PDF file at www.minedu.govt.nz http://www.tki.org.nz/r/governance/curriculum/copyguide_e.php http://www.tki.org.nz/r/governance/copyright/index_e.php </li></ul>Copyright Copyright
    8. 21. <ul><li>What is creative commons? </li></ul><ul><li>Some authors think copyright law stifles creativity. </li></ul><ul><li>Creative commons enables copyright owners (authors) to specify different copyright rules for their material - they can create a copyright license via the website. </li></ul><ul><li>Creative commons has been crucial for the development of Web 2.0 tools. </li></ul><ul><li>Check out the creative commons video below for a detailed explanation. </li></ul><ul><li>Find out more information from: http://www.creativecommons.com </li></ul>Copyright Copyright
    9. 22. <ul><li>Something to consider with Web 2.0 </li></ul><ul><li>Carefully read terms of use agreements when you create Web 2.0 accounts - before you upload student work or images, for example, this is taken from the RockYou! slideshow site terms of use agreement: </li></ul><ul><li>“ You also hereby grant each User of the RockYou! Sites a non-exclusive license to access your User Submissions through the Site, and to use, reproduce, distribute, prepare derivative works of, display and perform such User Submissions as permitted through the functionality of the RockYou! Sites and under these Terms of Use,” </li></ul><ul><li>From: http://www. rockyou . com/tos .php </li></ul><ul><li>What does this mean for the copyright of your student’s images if you post them on this site? </li></ul>Copyright Copyright
    10. 23. <ul><li>What is privacy? </li></ul><ul><li>“ Internet websites can be accessed by anyone with an online connection. Material published is effectively made available to the world at large. In recognition of this, schools should take steps to safeguard the privacy of their students and to comply with the Privacy Act 1993 when publishing online. </li></ul><ul><li>The Privacy Act defines &quot;personal information&quot; as any information about an &quot;identifiable individual&quot;.” </li></ul><ul><li>Quoted from Guidelines for Schools for the Online Publication of Student Images and Schoolwork http://www.tki.org.nz/r/governance/curriculum/copyguide_e.php </li></ul><ul><li>Privacy Commissioner - The Privacy Act and Codes http://www.privacy.org.nz/privacy-act/ </li></ul>Privacy
    11. 24. <ul><li>Some key tips are: </li></ul><ul><li>Get permission from students, and parents before posting student images online. </li></ul><ul><li>Get permission from other people (adults) before you post their images or names online. </li></ul><ul><li>Use students’ first names only. </li></ul><ul><li>Be careful about the personal information that you or your students post online, don’t provide last names, phone numbers, email addresses, or personal details, post appropriate images. </li></ul><ul><li>Find out more information from: Guidelines for Schools for the Online Publication of Student Images and Schoolwork http://www.tki.org.nz/r/governance/curriculum/copyguide_e.php </li></ul>Privacy
    12. 25. <ul><li>Something else to consider with Web 2.0 </li></ul><ul><li>Before you start to use Web 2.0 tools in the classroom, make sure your current information for parents, and copyright and privacy permission sign off covers these online tools. </li></ul><ul><li>You may need to adapt these if your policy or permission form only states publication “on the school website”. </li></ul>Privacy Copyright Copyright
    13. 26. <ul><li>Participation </li></ul><ul><li>Here are some ways you can participate on www.time4online.org. nz after viewing this presentation and looking at the recommended links: </li></ul><ul><li>Forum - Ask questions, make a comment, or share with others what you have done in your school or class to meet copyright and privacy requirements when you use the online environment and Web 2.0 tools. </li></ul><ul><li>Sharing tool - if you have any policies or permission forms that you are willing to share with others, please upload them to the site. </li></ul>

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