Hearing loss options and explanations

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Hearing loss options and explanations

  1. 1. An Interactive Guide to Hearing Loss Explanations and Options By: Staci Cobabe Salt Lake Community College Information Courtesy of The Mayo Clinic on Hearing, 2003 edition, editor: Wayne Olsen, Ph.D. Click To Continue
  2. 2. Hearing Loss Types <ul><li>What kind of hearing loss have you or your loved one been diagnosed with? </li></ul>Conductive Sensorineural Central Auditory Processing Disorder I Don’t Know
  3. 3. Conductive Hearing Loss <ul><li>Is usually caused by: something blocking the pathway of the ear canal and/or middle ear. It makes it so the sound waves cannot get through properly to the sensory receptors in the inner ear. Some causes include: foreign object lodged in the ear, middle ear infections, head trauma, and abnormal bone growth in the ear. </li></ul><ul><li>All the sounds you hear seem to be muffled, no matter the frequency (pitch) or level of intensity (loudness) of the sound. </li></ul>Back to All Hearing Loss Types Next: Hearing Loss Levels Next: Sensorineural Hearing Loss
  4. 4. Sensorineural Hearing Loss <ul><li>Is usually caused by: damage to the structures of the inner ear such as: the hair cells in the cochlea, the nerve fibers leading from the cochlea to the brain, disease, trauma, genetic disorder, or the general wear and tear of aging. </li></ul><ul><li>People with Sensorineural hearing loss usually have a hard time perceiving high-frequency sounds such as certain consonants in speech. </li></ul><ul><li>Some improvement in hearing may be facilitated by using an implantable hearing aid, or a cochlear implant. </li></ul>Implantable Hearing Aid Cochlear Implant Next: Hearing Loss Levels Back to All Hearing Loss Types Next: Central Auditory Processing Disorders
  5. 5. Central Auditory Processing Disorders <ul><li>Is usually caused by: injury to the auditory processing centers of your brain which can be caused by trauma, disease, or a genetic disorder. </li></ul><ul><li>This occasionally leads to hearing problems and difficulty with the following: interpreting sound, locating the source of a sound, distinguishing between sounds, recognizing frequency patterns, and listening to multiple sources at once. </li></ul>Back to All Hearing Loss Types Next: Hearing Loss Levels
  6. 6. Click on the level of decibel loss you would like to learn more about: 16-25 Decibel Hearing Loss – Slight/Minimal 26-30 Decibel Hearing Loss – Mild 31-50 Decibel Hearing Loss – Moderate 51-70 Decibel Hearing Loss – Moderate/Severe 71-90 Decibel Hearing Loss – Severe 91+ Decibel Hearing Loss – Profound Back to All Hearing Loss Types
  7. 7. Slight/Minimal Hearing Loss Explanation and Options <ul><li>If you are experiencing a slight or minimal hearing loss, you probably have difficulty hearing faint or distant sounds. </li></ul><ul><li>You probably do not need a hearing aid, but if you are looking for something to help you hear better, you would be able to use any type of hearing aid you choose. </li></ul>Back to Conductive Hearing Loss Back to Sensorineural Hearing Loss Back to All Hearing Loss Types Back to All Hearing Loss Levels Next: Hearing Aid Types
  8. 8. Mild Hearing Loss Explanation and Options <ul><li>If you are experiencing a mild hearing loss, you may miss consonants occasionally. You may also have an increasing difficulty understanding with noisy backgrounds and faraway speakers. </li></ul><ul><li>If you are looking for some improvement in your hearing, you would be able to use any type of hearing aid you choose. </li></ul>Next: Hearing Aid Types Back to Conductive Hearing Loss Back to Sensorineural Hearing Loss Back to All Hearing Loss Types Back to All Hearing Loss Levels
  9. 9. Moderate Hearing Loss Explanation and Options <ul><li>If you are experiencing a moderate hearing loss, you probably can understand conversations only when you are face to face and the topic of conversation is limited. </li></ul><ul><li>If you are wanting to improve your hearing, you might benefit from using a hearing aid. You can use any type of hearing aid you desire. </li></ul><ul><li>If you are suffering from Sensorineural Hearing Loss, you may benefit from an implantable hearing aid. </li></ul>Back to Conductive Hearing Loss Back to Sensorineural Hearing Loss Back to All Hearing Loss Types Back to All Hearing Loss Levels Next: All Hearing Aid Types Next: Implantable Hearing Aids
  10. 10. Moderate/Severe Hearing Loss Explanation and Options <ul><li>If you are experiencing Moderate to Severe Hearing Loss, you probably miss most of what is said in a conversation, and may have difficulty listening in a group setting. </li></ul><ul><li>If you want to improve your hearing, many types of hearing aids may help. You may benefit from In The Canal (ITC), In The Ear (ITE) or Behind The Ear (BTE) types of hearing aids. However, the Completely In Canal (CIC) and Disposable types are not powerful enough for this level of hearing loss. </li></ul><ul><li>If you are suffering from Sensorineural Hearing Loss, you may benefit from an implantable hearing aid. </li></ul>Back to Conductive Hearing Loss Back to Sensorineural Hearing Loss Back to All Hearing Loss Types Back to All Hearing Loss Levels Next: All Hearing Aid Types Next: Implantable Hearing Aids
  11. 11. Severe Hearing Loss Explanation and Options <ul><li>If you are experiencing a Severe Hearing Loss, you may not be able to hear speech unless it is very loud, and you may need amplification to converse normally. </li></ul><ul><li>If you are looking for improvement, you may benefit from In The Ear (ITE) or Behind The Ear (BTE) hearing aids. </li></ul><ul><li>If you suffer from Sensorineural hearing loss, you may benefit from an Implantable Hearing Aid or a Cochlear Implant. </li></ul>Next: Implantable Hearing Aids Next: All Hearing Aid Types Back to All Hearing Loss Types Back to All Hearing Loss Levels Back to Conductive Hearing Loss Back to Sensorineural Hearing Loss Next: Cochlear Implant
  12. 12. Profound Hearing Loss Explanation and Options <ul><li>If you are experiencing a Profound hearing loss, you may not be able to hear speech at all, you may also rely on visual clues such as lip reading or body language. </li></ul><ul><li>If you want to improve your hearing, your options are very limited. Most hearing aids will offer little to no help. </li></ul><ul><li>If you are suffering from Sensorineural hearing loss, you might benefit from a Cochlear implant. </li></ul><ul><li>If you do not want to improve your hearing, Sign language is the method of communication used by most deaf individuals. If you prefer to stick with an English based system of communication, there are speech reading techniques and other forms of sign language such as cued speech and Signed Exact English. </li></ul>Back to Conductive Hearing Loss Back to Sensorineural Hearing Loss Back to All Hearing Loss Types Back to All Hearing Loss Levels Next: All Hearing Aid Types Next: Cochlear Implant Next: Sign Language
  13. 13. Hearing Aid Types <ul><li>Click on the type of hearing aid you want to learn more about. </li></ul>Completely In Canal (CIC) In The Canal (ITC) In The Ear (ITE) Behind The Ear (BTE) Disposable
  14. 14. Completely In Canal Hearing Aids (CIC) <ul><li>This is the smallest type of hearing aid available. All parts, including the battery, are contained in a tiny case that fits deep inside the ear canal. A thin, plastic pull cord sticks out into the bowl-shaped area of the ear to help in removal. </li></ul><ul><li>The CIC aids are appropriate for Mild to Moderate hearing loss. </li></ul><ul><li>The CIC aids are NOT appropriate for infants or children. </li></ul><ul><li>ADVANTAGES: It is the least visible hearing aid. It may help reduce wind noise. </li></ul><ul><li>DISADVANTAGES: CIC aids have less space for add-ons. Batteries are smaller, so battery life may be shorter. This is the most expensive type of hearing aid. This style may be difficult to handle for those with dexterity problems. </li></ul>Back to Slight/Minimal Hearing Loss Next: In The Canal Hearing Aids Back to All Hearing Loss Levels Back to Mild Hearing Loss Back to Moderate Hearing Loss Photo courtesy of www.mayoclinic.com END Back to All Hearing Loss Types
  15. 15. In The Canal Hearing Aids (ITC) <ul><li>An ITC hearing aid fits partly in the ear canal but not as deeply as a CIC. The edge of the ITC aid extends into the bowl of the ear. </li></ul><ul><li>The ITC is appropriate for Mild to Moderate/Severe hearing loss. </li></ul><ul><li>The ITC is NOT appropriate for infants or children. </li></ul><ul><li>ADVANTAGES: ITC aids are hardly noticeable, has more opportunities for add-ons than a CIC, and is more powerful than a CIC. </li></ul><ul><li>DISADVANTAGES: ITC aids can be difficult to handle, insert, and change batteries. The ITC are also rather expensive. </li></ul>Back to Moderate Hearing Loss Back to Mild Hearing Loss Next: In The Ear Hearing Aids Back to All Hearing Loss Levels Back to Slight/Minimal Hearing Loss Back to Moderate/Severe Hearing Loss Photo courtesy of www.mayoclinic.com END Back to All Hearing Loss Types
  16. 16. In The Ear Hearing Aids (ITE) <ul><li>This style of hearing aid fills most of the bowl-shaped portion of the ear. </li></ul><ul><li>The ITE aids are appropriate for Mild to Severe hearing loss. </li></ul><ul><li>ADVANTAGES: These aids can be more powerful than those that fin in the canal. The ITE can accommodate more add-ons. Their batteries are larger and more easily changed. </li></ul><ul><li>DISADVANTAGES: ITE aids may pick up more wind noise. </li></ul>Next: Behind the ear Hearing aids Back to all hearing loss levels Back to Mild Hearing Loss Back to Moderate Hearing Loss Back to Moderate/Severe Hearing Loss Back to Severe Hearing Loss Photo courtesy of www.mayoclinic.com END Back to All Hearing Loss Types
  17. 17. Behind The Ear Hearing Aids (BTE) <ul><li>BTE Aids have 2 parts. A small plastic case that rests behind the ear contains the hearing aid circuitry: the microphone, amplifier, and loudspeaker. The case is connected by plastic tubing to a custom-made earmold (earpiece) that directs the amplified sound into your ear. </li></ul><ul><li>BTE aids are appropriate for almost all types of hearing loss and people of all ages. </li></ul><ul><li>BTE aids are sometimes perceived as being “old fashioned” or “not technologically advanced”. But in fact, BTE aids have modern electronic and digital technology like the other styles and in some cases provide the greatest improvement in hearing. </li></ul><ul><li>ADVANTAGES: These are the most powerful hearing aids, and they can be adjusted for any degree of hearing loss. BTE aids are the best style for infants, children, and people with more severe hearing loss. BTE aids are the easiest to maintain, usually require fewer repairs, and battery replacement is easier. </li></ul><ul><li>DISADVANTAGES: Some people don’t have enough space between their ear and the side of their head to accommodate this style. This style may pick up more wind noise than the smaller aids do. </li></ul>Next: Disposable Hearing Aids Back to All Hearing Loss Levels Back to Slight/Minimal Hearing Loss Back to Mild Hearing Loss Back to Moderate Hearing Loss Back to Moderate/Severe Hearing Loss Back to Severe Hearing Loss Back to Profound Hearing Loss Photo courtesy of www.mayoclinic.com END Back to All Hearing Loss Types
  18. 18. Disposable Hearing Aids <ul><li>Disposable aids are In The Canal (ITC) hearing aids designed to be worn for 40 to 70 days, then discarded. </li></ul><ul><li>These devices are suitable for Slight/Minimal to Moderate Hearing Loss. </li></ul><ul><li>Using disposable aids may eliminate maintenance problems due to moisture and wax buildup that occur with ongoing use of standard aids. </li></ul><ul><li>Disposable aids can be fitted at your hearing evaluation, so you can leave wearing your new hearing aid. However, disposable aids will not fit everyone’s ears or meet everyone’s needs. </li></ul><ul><li>ADVANTAGES: Disposable aids require minimal maintenance. You cn receive them at the time of your hearing evaluation. </li></ul><ul><li>DISADVANTAGES: These aids are not custom fit, and may not fit everyone comfortably. They have less adjustable circuitry and no special features. Also, there is the ongoing expense of buying a new one every two months. </li></ul>Photo courtesy of www.cicoil.com Back to Slight/Minimal Hearing Loss Back to Mild Hearing Loss Back to Moderate Hearing Loss Back to All Hearing Loss Levels END Back to All Hearing Loss Types
  19. 19. Implantable Hearing Aid <ul><li>Implantable hearing aids are an alternative to traditional hearing aids for people with Moderate to Severe Sensorineural Hearing Loss. </li></ul><ul><li>Implantable hearing aids conduct sound by vibrating the middle ear bones directly to stimulate the inner ear. </li></ul><ul><li>This device is NOT recommended for those with Conductive Hearing Loss. </li></ul><ul><li>A wire leads from the receiver to the electromagnet attached to one of the middle ear bones. Some styles have the receiver surgically implanted into the skull behind the ear with an external amplifier. Other styles have the receiver and amplifier in an external processor worn behind the ear. </li></ul>Photo courtesy of Microtia Australia Vibrant Soundbridge via http://microtiaaustralia.org.au ADVANTAGES: These devices may produce a more natural sound and are more versatile for sporting activities such as swimming. DISADVANTAGES: Implantable aids require surgery, and can cost from $6,000 to $18,000 depending on which device is selected and which type of anesthesia is necessary. Back to Sensorineural Hearing Loss Next: Cochlear Implant END
  20. 20. Cochlear Implant <ul><li>Cochlear implants are not an alternative to hearing aids. </li></ul><ul><li>These devices are designed for individuals who receive little to no help from hearing aids. </li></ul><ul><li>Candidates for cochlear implants typically have severe to profound sensorineural hearing loss in both ears or have great difficulty understanding speech. </li></ul><ul><li>Children as young as 1 year old can receive the implant, and there is no upper age limit. </li></ul><ul><li>ADVANTAGES: Many insurance companies cover cochlear implants which greatly reduces the cost to the patient. </li></ul>Photo courtesy of www.mayoclinic.com <ul><li>DISADVANTAGES: There is a lot of follow-up and programming that must be done after the surgery. This is a time-commitment that some people do not want. The surgery and all the pre and post operative requirements can cost between $30,000 and $50,000. That can be very costly if your insurance does not cover 100% of the procedure. </li></ul>Back to Sensorineural Hearing Loss Next: Sign Language END
  21. 21. Sign Language <ul><li>There are several kinds of sign language. The language preferred by most deaf individuals who associate themselves with the Deaf culture in the United States is American Sign Language. </li></ul><ul><li>If you are more interested in remaining in the English culture, Manually Coded English, Cued Speech, Signed Exact English and Lip Reading are all options. </li></ul><ul><li>Individuals of all ages can learn these skills and methods of communication. </li></ul>END Back to Sensorineural Hearing Loss Back to All Hearing Loss Levels Pictures courtesy of www.cdc.gov
  22. 22. THE END!!! <ul><li>Thank You for taking the time to learn more about hearing loss and options. I hope this presentation has been helpful and informative. You can click below to return to the starting page if you would like to explore more. </li></ul>BACK TO START

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