Paul Revere’s Ride<br />By Tiffany Jacobs<br />HIST 140 (#50607)<br />
The Capture: A British Patrol Takes Paul Revere, and Is Taken By Him<br />Paul Revere and William Dawes were riding from C...
The Capture: A British Patrol Takes Paul Revere, and Is Taken By Him<br />Upon interrogation, Revere answered honestly.<br...
The Alarm:Paul Revere and the other riders<br />“Paul and his fellow Whigs of Massachusetts understood… political institut...
The Alarm:Paul Revere and the other riders<br />Riders traveled out in succession, like a game of telephone<br />The speed...
The Muster:The rising of the militia<br />Provincial Congress recommended “minute companies”<br />Minute companies were sm...
The Muster:The rising of the militia<br />Lexington’s militia was ready within minutes of the alarm<br />Armed with musket...
The Great Fear:A Rural Panic in New England<br />“The people of New England did not wish for war”<br />Every generation ha...
The Great Fear:A Rural Panic in New England<br /> Dealing with fear in different ways<br />Helping the militia<br />Cookin...
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Paul Revere’s Ride

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Paul Revere’s Ride

  1. 1. Paul Revere’s Ride<br />By Tiffany Jacobs<br />HIST 140 (#50607)<br />
  2. 2. The Capture: A British Patrol Takes Paul Revere, and Is Taken By Him<br />Paul Revere and William Dawes were riding from Charlestown to sound the alarm<br />On the road, they came upon Doctor Prescott, who offered help<br />As they approached the Nelson farms, Revere saw two horsemen on the road<br />Revere convinced the others they could prevail against them until the 2 men turned into 4<br />Doctor Prescott got away<br />Revere was captured by 10 British Regulars after giving chase<br />Dawes pretended he had captured two of men and averted the British’s attention <br />He limped back to Lexington<br />The officer who captured Revere proceeded to abuse him; however, the leader did not. He was a gentleman<br />Elijah Sanderson, Jonathan Loring, Solomon Brown, and a one-armed peddler named Allen had also been captured that night<br />
  3. 3. The Capture: A British Patrol Takes Paul Revere, and Is Taken By Him<br />Upon interrogation, Revere answered honestly.<br /> When his life was threatened if he didn’t tell the truth, Revere became angry. He was an honest man<br />Revere told the officers details about the mission that they were not aware of yet<br />He spoke with voracity and strength<br />It surprised and angered the officers<br />Revere eventually turned the interrogation on them<br />Major Mitchell of the 5th Foot was summoned<br />He demanded the officers search Revere for weapons, but he was not armed <br />He hit Revere in the head with his pistol<br />Revere was strategic in his answers<br />His goal was to move the soldiers away from Lexington, and far from Hancock and Adams<br />Revere was not afraid of the British or afraid of their threats<br />His demeanor frustrated and irritated the officers<br />The officers increasingly lost their composure<br />Upon hearing the gun storm in Lexington, the captives were set free<br />Their horses were cut loose<br />This was the last time Revere saw Brown Beauty<br />
  4. 4. The Alarm:Paul Revere and the other riders<br />“Paul and his fellow Whigs of Massachusetts understood… political institutions are instruments of human will, and amplifiers of individual action”<br />Paul Revere was not a solitary rider that night! <br />He established relationships within the Whig party<br />Revere made strategic plans, and backup plans, well in advance of the famous night ride<br />Revere had foresight and contingency plans in place<br />He was the organizer of a network of riders<br />Revere notified town leaders on his ride. <br />He did not go door to door<br />Along Revere’s route, specific leaders and militia commanders were strategically alerted<br />This impacted the result of the evening<br />Revere knew the leaders in each town and where to find them<br />He worked to engage the institutions of each town: religious, militia, and community organizations<br />
  5. 5. The Alarm:Paul Revere and the other riders<br />Riders traveled out in succession, like a game of telephone<br />The speed of the message was astonishing<br />These were distances that were normally covered in one long days’ travel<br />They were being covered in a matter of one or two hours<br />Towns were alarmed by bells, drums, and gunfire before the messengers could arrive<br />These signals were prearranged<br />Like Revere, Prescott proceeded to sound the alarm by meeting with leaders<br />Doctors made house calls and therefore had best horses<br />He went to his home & alerted his father and brothers<br />They were also physicians with horses and saddles <br />Unlike Revere, Dawes rode directly to Lexington<br />He may not have met with anyone on the way<br />A town on Dawes route was never alarmed<br />Several other towns did not receive their alarm until much later, after he had already passed by<br />
  6. 6. The Muster:The rising of the militia<br />Provincial Congress recommended “minute companies”<br />Minute companies were small units of men<br />They were ready to march at short notice<br />Each town made various arrangements depending upon their specific needs<br />Some men were required to be armed with specific ammunition and supplies<br />Snowshoe men had snowshoes and hatchets <br />Required to exercise twice a week<br />Paid for their service<br />Planned for the burial of their dead after war<br />
  7. 7. The Muster:The rising of the militia<br />Lexington’s militia was ready within minutes of the alarm<br />Armed with muskets<br />Many were diligent dairy farmers<br />They were aged 16-66, but most were in their mid 30’s & 40’s<br />They did not have a “minute company”<br />One large Training Band company<br />Captain John Parker led the Lexington militia<br />Was well respected and admired by townspeople<br />He served despite suffering from pulmonary tuberculosis<br />Many years of preparation preceded the rise of the militia<br />“Training bands” were maintained for over 6 generations<br />Experienced 4 wars in 75 years<br />
  8. 8. The Great Fear:A Rural Panic in New England<br />“The people of New England did not wish for war”<br />Every generation had experienced a war<br />Most were bloody and cruel<br />Our modern day perspective of the day our Independence was born is bright & hopeful<br />On that morning it was uncertain, dangerous and ominous<br />Terror gripped the people<br />Woman & children fled for safety<br />Narrow country roads were gridlocked with foot traffic<br />Women and children leaving town and minute companies going to town<br />Some fled Lexington for the safety of the country<br />Some women fled their home into the woods<br />Many fled to churches for sanctuary even though it put them in the middle of the battlefield<br />
  9. 9. The Great Fear:A Rural Panic in New England<br /> Dealing with fear in different ways<br />Helping the militia<br />Cooking and serving the men who were preparing to leave<br />Acting as a guide to the troops of men<br />Comforting others who were fearful<br />Feared the uprising of their slaves (for no reason)<br />Women of Pepperell organized<br />To avoid the grip of fear, these women met together and organized<br />They voted for a leader, Prudence Wright<br />The women armed themselves with guns and farm tools<br />They took patrols on the road<br />A Tory was arrested at gunpoint and delivered for a reward<br />Fear fueled rumors<br />Wild rumors of entire towns being slaughtered<br />Even the British Regulars were gripped by this fear<br />They were living in the land of a host that no longer welcomed them<br />

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