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Human Resource Information Systems (Victoria University Australia)

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Sharing the very first lecture of HRIS module that I've completed in my Master Degree. Genuinely appreciated to Unit Coordinator and Lecturer: Dr Shah Miah and our Lecturer: Justin Chiew.

"I do hope the reader can put it off into a good use and for academic purposes"

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Human Resource Information Systems (Victoria University Australia)

  1. 1. !!! Welcome on Board !!!! BMO5565  HUMAN RESOURCE INFORMATION SYSTEMS Unit Coordinator and Lecturer: Dr Shah Miah Lecturer: Justin Chiew
  2. 2. Introduction to Human Resource Information Systems (HRIS)
  3. 3. HRIS  Human resources information system (HRIS)  Computerized system that provides current and accurate data for purposes of control and decision making in HRM.  Benefits:  Store and retrieve of large quantities of data.  Combine and reconfigure data to create new information.  Institutionalization of organizational knowledge.  Easier communications.  Lower administrative costs, increase productivity and response times. Michael J. Kavanagh, Mohan Thite, and Richard D. Johnson - Human Resource Information Systems: Basics, Applications, and Future Directions, 2e © 2012 SAGE Publications, Inc. 4
  4. 4. HRIS DEFINITION  Not just hardware-software  Includes people, forms, policies, procedures, and data  Purpose – provide service  Variety of users  Strategic users  Operational decisions makers  End level users Michael J. Kavanagh, Mohan Thite, and Richard D. Johnson - Human Resource Information Systems: Basics, Applications, and Future Directions, 2e © 2012 SAGE Publications, Inc. 5
  5. 5. Benefit in particular to HRM  Help achieve employee goals tied back to organisation  Time analysis to assess full productivity  Real time visibility of employee, managers-skills capabilities  Identifying critical job roles and risk levels to fix  Workforce status such as for up-to-date accreditation, qualifications, certificates etc.
  6. 6. LECTURE OBJECTIVES  Need of HRIS  Explaining combination of these two fields into Human Resource Information Systems (HRIS)  Explaining major underlying themes  Describing terms in common use in the HRM, IT, and HRIS fields Michael J. Kavanagh, Mohan Thite, and Richard D. Johnson - Human Resource Information Systems: Basics, Applications, and Future Directions, 2e © 2012 SAGE Publications, Inc. 7
  7. 7. NEED FOR HRIS: THE EXTERNAL ENVIRONMENT  Government regulations  EEO -1 report  Employee composition  Increased records and reports  Court decisions  New laws EEO is Equal Employment Opportunity that says about making sure that workplaces are free from all forms of unlawful discrimination and harassment. Michael J. Kavanagh, Mohan Thite, and Richard D. Johnson - Human Resource Information Systems: Basics, Applications, and Future Directions, 2e © 2012 SAGE Publications, Inc. 8
  8. 8. External environment  Technology  LANs, portals  Labor market  Human resources planning  External environmental scanning  Societal concerns  Employee information requests  Privacy issues  Pollution  Community awareness Michael J. Kavanagh, mohan thite, and richard D. Johnson - human resource information systems: basics, applications, and future directions, 2e © 2012 SAGE publications, inc. 9
  9. 9. EXTERNAL ENVIRONMENT  Competition  Compensation management  Labor market surveys  Compensation planning  HR state-of-the-art  Professional organizations  Professional publications Michael J. Kavanagh, Mohan Thite, and Richard D. Johnson - Human Resource Information Systems: Basics, Applications, and Future Directions, 2e © 2012 SAGE Publications, Inc. 10
  10. 10. Historical Evolution of HRM Role of HRM Early 20th Century 21st Century Caretaker Strategic Partner Employee focus Records Cost effectiveness Employee development
  11. 11. TECHNOLOGY ADVANCEMENT ERA (90S- TODAY)  HRIS commonplace- high technology (Internet)  Storage capacity and processing power increases  HR main part of strategy planning - strategic partner  Globalization of companies  Hardware-software tools in decision-making Michael J. Kavanagh, Mohan Thite, and Richard D. Johnson - Human Resource Information Systems: Basics, Applications, and Future Directions, 2e © 2012 SAGE Publications, Inc. 12
  12. 12. THE EVOLUTION OF STRATEGIC HRM  Contingency perspective and fit  Resource - based view of the firm and social capital,  HR system components and structure  Expanding the scope of HRM beyond the focal organization  Achieving HR implementation and execution, by translating the rhetoric into practice,  Measuring the outcomes of SHRM by (E.G., Balanced scorecard approach)  Research methodological issues that stress the importance of evidence based management  Adoption and use of HR metrics  Application of “six sigma" processes to HRM. Michael J. Kavanagh, Mohan Thite, and Richard D. Johnson - Human Resource Information Systems: Basics, Applications, and Future Directions, 2e © 2012 SAGE Publications, Inc. 13
  13. 13. COMPETITIVE ADVANTAGE  Three Categories Of Resources:  Physical  Organizational  Human Most Critical Michael J. Kavanagh, Mohan Thite, and Richard D. Johnson - Human Resource Information Systems: Basics, Applications, and Future Directions, 2e © 2012 SAGE Publications, Inc. 14
  14. 14. HRD Functions  Training and development (T&D)  Organizational development  Career development Werner, J. M., & DeSimone, R. L. (2006). Human Resource Development (4th Edition). Mason, Ohio: Thomson South-Western. 15
  15. 15. Training and Development (T&D)  Training – improving the knowledge, skills and attitudes of employees for the short-term, particular to a specific job or task – e.g.,  Employee orientation  Skills & technical training  Coaching  Counseling 16 Werner, J. M., & DeSimone, R. L. (2006). Human Resource Development (4th Edition). Mason, Ohio: Thomson South-Western.
  16. 16. Training and Development (T&D)  Development – preparing for future responsibilities, while increasing the capacity to perform at a current job  Management training  Supervisor development Werner, J. M., & DeSimone, R. L. (2006). Human Resource Development (4th Edition). Mason, Ohio: Thomson South-Western. 17
  17. 17. Organizational Development  The process of improving an organization’s effectiveness and member’s well-being through the application of behavioral science concepts  Focuses on both macro- and micro-levels  HRD plays the role of a change agent Werner, J. M., & DeSimone, R. L. (2006). Human Resource Development (4th Edition). Mason, Ohio: Thomson South-Western. 18
  18. 18. Career Development  Ongoing process by which individuals progress through series of changes until they achieve their personal level of maximum achievement.  Career planning  Career management Werner, J. M., & DeSimone, R. L. (2006). Human Resource Development (4th Edition). Mason, Ohio: Thomson South-Western. 19
  19. 19. Critical HRD Issues  Strategic management and HRD  The supervisor’s role in HRD  Organizational structure of HRD Werner, J. M., & DeSimone, R. L. (2006). Human Resource Development (4th Edition). Mason, Ohio: Thomson South-Western. 20
  20. 20. Strategic Management & HRD  Strategic management aims to ensure organizational effectiveness for the foreseeable future – e.g., maximizing profits in the next 3 to 5 years  HRD aims to get managers and workers ready for new products, procedures, and materials Werner, J. M., & DeSimone, R. L. (2006). Human Resource Development (4th Edition). Mason, Ohio: Thomson South-Western. 21
  21. 21. Supervisor’s Role in HRD  Implements HRD programs and procedures  On-the-job training (OJT)  Coaching/mentoring/counseling  Career and employee development  A “front-line participant” in HRD Werner, J. M., & DeSimone, R. L. (2006). Human Resource Development (4th Edition). Mason, Ohio: Thomson South-Western. 22
  22. 22. Organizational Structure of HRD Departments  Depends on company size, industry and maturity  No single structure used  Depends in large part on how well the HRD manager becomes an institutional part of the company – i.e., a revenue contributor, not just a revenue user Werner, J. M., & DeSimone, R. L. (2006). Human Resource Development (4th Edition). Mason, Ohio: Thomson South-Western. 23
  23. 23. HRD Organization in a Large Company Werner, J. M., & DeSimone, R. L. (2006). Human Resource Development (4th Edition). Mason, Ohio: Thomson South-Western. 24
  24. 24. Sample HRD Jobs/Roles  Executive/Manager  HR Strategic Advisor  HR Systems Designer/Developer  Organization Change Agent  Organization Design Consultant  Learning Program Specialist Werner, J. M., & DeSimone, R. L. (2006). Human Resource Development (4th Edition). Mason, Ohio: Thomson South-Western. 25
  25. 25. Sample HRD Jobs/Roles – 2  Instructor/Facilitator  Individual Development and Career Counselor  Performance Consultant (Coach)  Researcher Werner, J. M., & DeSimone, R. L. (2006). Human Resource Development (4th Edition). Mason, Ohio: Thomson South-Western. 26
  26. 26. HR Manager Role  Integrates HRD with organizational goals and strategies  Promotes HRD as a profit enhancer  Tailors HRD to corporate needs and budget  Institutionalizes performance enhancement Werner, J. M., & DeSimone, R. L. (2006). Human Resource Development (4th Edition). Mason, Ohio: Thomson South-Western. 27
  27. 27. HR Systems Designer/Developer  Assists HR manager in the design and development of HR systems  Designs HR programs  Develops intervention strategies  Plans HR implementation actions 28 Werner, J. M., & DeSimone, R. L. (2006). Human Resource Development (4th Edition). Mason, Ohio: Thomson South-Western.
  28. 28. ACTIVITIES OF HR Michael J. Kavanagh, Mohan Thite, and Richard D. Johnson - Human Resource Information Systems: Basics, Applications, and Future Directions, 2e © 2012 SAGE Publications, Inc. 29 Transactional Traditional Transformational
  29. 29. HR ACTIVITIES & TIME SPENT  Transactional (65-75%)  Benefits administration, record keeping, employee services  Traditional (15-30%)  Recruitment, selection, training, performance management, compensation, employee relations  Transformational (5-15%)  Knowledge management, strategic redirection and renewal, cultural change, management development  Added value Michael J. Kavanagh, Mohan Thite, and Richard D. Johnson - Human Resource Information Systems: Basics, Applications, and Future Directions, 2e © 2012 SAGE Publications, Inc. 30 Wright, McMahan, Snell, & Gerhart, 1998
  30. 30. HRIS  The effective management of human resources to gain a competitive advantage in the market place requires timely and accurate information on current employees.  With the evolution of computer technology, meeting this information requirement has been greatly enhanced through the creation of Human Resource Information Systems (HRIS) (Thite & Kavanagh, 2012) Michael J. Kavanagh, Mohan Thite, and Richard D. Johnson - Human Resource Information Systems: Basics, Applications, and Future Directions, 2e © 2012 SAGE Publications, Inc. 31
  31. 31. E-HRM & HRIS  Electronic human resource management (e-HRM)  Information technology (E.G., Web)central component  Application and HR-function focused  HRIS  Technology and processes (E.G., Databases, enterprise resources planning (ERP) architecture, smart phones, etc.) that support employee access to HR data and the move to e-HRM. Michael J. Kavanagh, Mohan Thite, and Richard D. Johnson - Human Resource Information Systems: Basics, Applications, and Future Directions, 2e © 2012 SAGE Publications, Inc. 32
  32. 32. BIGGEST ADVANTAGES OF HRIS Reduced manual handling and paperwork Or Enables greater impact of paperwork on business operation  Reports  Analysis  Negotiations  Communications Michael J. Kavanagh, Mohan Thite, and Richard D. Johnson - Human Resource Information Systems: Basics, Applications, and Future Directions, 2e © 2012 SAGE Publications, Inc. 33
  33. 33. INFORMATION SYSTEMS PROVIDING SUPPORT FOR HRM (Table 1.1) Michael J. Kavanagh, Mohan Thite, and Richard D. Johnson - Human Resource Information Systems: Basics, Applications, and Future Directions, 2e © 2012 SAGE Publications, Inc. 34 Organizational Level Type of System Major Goal and Focus HRM Example Operational Transaction Processing System Improved transaction speed and accuracy Improved efficiency in the processing of daily business transactions Automation of routine transactions Reduced transaction costs Payroll processing Time and attendance entry Managerial Management Information System Provides key data to managers Supports regular and ongoing decisions Provides defined and ad- hoc reporting Producing EE03 reports Calculating yield ratios for recruiting Calculating per-capita merit increases Executive Executive Information System Provides aggregate, high- level data Helps managers with long- range planning Supports strategic direction and decisions Succession planning Aggregate data on balanced scorecard
  34. 34. INFORMATION SYSTEMS PROVIDING SUPPORT FOR HRM (Table 1.1 Cont.) Michael J. Kavanagh, Mohan Thite, and Richard D. Johnson - Human Resource Information Systems: Basics, Applications, and Future Directions, 2e © 2012 SAGE Publications, Inc. 35 Organizational Level Type of System Major Goal and Focus HRM Example Boundary Spanning Decision Support System Interactive and iterative managerial decision-making Supports forecasting and “what-if” analysis Supports business simulations Staffing needs assessment Labor market analysis Employee skills assessment Expert System Embed human knowledge into information systems Automate decisions with technology Résumé keyword searches Office Automation Systems Designing documents Scheduling shared resources Communication E-mail training room scheduling Collaboration Technologies Supports electronic communication and collaboration between employees Supports virtual teams Communication support for e- learning Online meetings and shared documents HR departmental wikis Enterprise Resources Planning System Integration and centralization of corporate data Share data across functional boundaries Single data source and common technology architecture Orangery Oracle/PeopleSoft Lawson HRM SAP
  35. 35. 2010 HR Service Delivery Survey Report (Towers Watson, Aug. 2010) http://www.towerswatson.com/assets/pdf/2247/2247.pdf  456 organisations; 51% global  Focus on value of talent management systems  Updating/implementing systems – long-term effort to streamline HR processes and delivery  Shift from siloed ‘solutions’ to integration  More emphasis on change management  Metrics – trend analysis  Manager self-service
  36. 36. http://www.towerswatson.com/assets/pdf/2247/2247.pdf
  37. 37. CORPORATE CULTURE HR PROGRAMS Planning Recruiting & Selecting Training Performance Management Compensation Quality Of Life & Safety Employee & Labor Relations STRATEGIC MANAGEMENT SYSTEM HR PROGRAMS EVALUATION HR metrics HR Scorecard Value Added ROI FEEDBACK STRATEGIC HUMAN RESOURCES MANAGEME NT BUSINESS PLAN AND GOALS HR GOALS Retention Climate/Morale Productivity Accident Rate Absenteeism HUMAN RESOURCES INFORMATION SYSTEM IT KNOWLEDGE HR KNOWLEDGE FEEDBACK NATIONAL CULTURE EXTERNAL ENVIRONMENT GOVERNMENT REGULATIONS LABOR MARKET SOCIETAL CONCERNS TECHNOLOGY HRM RESEARCH COMPETITION Figure 1.2 Michael J. Kavanagh, Mohan Thite, and Richard D. Johnson - Human Resource Information Systems: Basics, Applications, and Future Directions, 2e © 2012 SAGE Publications, Inc. 38
  38. 38. A MODEL OF ORGANIZATIONAL FUNCTIONING  Organic model  HRIS is critical to the efficient operation of an organization  Interrelatedness between the strategic management system, the strategic HRM system, and the performance goals, business and HR are generated during the strategic planning process. Michael J. Kavanagh, Mohan Thite, and Richard D. Johnson - Human Resource Information Systems: Basics, Applications, and Future Directions, 2e © 2012 SAGE Publications, Inc. 39
  39. 39. A MODEL OF ORGANIZATIONAL FUNCTIONING  The HR goals drive the HR programs that provide management the tools for the efficient and effective use of employees  The HRIS has become increasingly important in supporting the HR management system as well as in strategic planning  HR metrics and cost-benefit results (value added and return on investment - ROI), are in continual interaction Michael J. Kavanagh, Mohan Thite, and Richard D. Johnson - Human Resource Information Systems: Basics, Applications, and Future Directions, 2e © 2012 SAGE Publications, Inc. 40
  40. 40. A MODEL OF ORGANIZATIONAL FUNCTIONING  National culture impacts entire model through strong effects on external environment  External environment influences internal functioning of organization  Interaction between strategic management system and strategic HRM will improve the functioning of the organization Michael J. Kavanagh, Mohan Thite, and Richard D. Johnson - Human Resource Information Systems: Basics, Applications, and Future Directions, 2e © 2012 SAGE Publications, Inc. 41
  41. 41. Example HRIS  SAP HCM  Chris 21- Australian Payroll  Talent 2  Intelligent Workforce Management (Mitrefinch Australia )
  42. 42. HRIS improvement through SAP Cloud
  43. 43. Web task  Visit http://www.successfactors.com/en_us.html a web site SAP. Get to know various SAP solutions for HR management:  What does the product aim to do?  What are the special features and limitations of this product?  Which organisations might be most likely to use this product?

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