“How
Moms
Socialize
Online”

               Mom
Central
Consulting
2009
Survey
Implications




Mom
Central
Consulting,
th...
and rely less on Moms for daily care and attention. Questions centering around
    “Now what?” and “What’s Next?” abound f...
•   Resurgence of Mom Cliques: Most Moms first experienced cliques somewhere
    back in the fifth grade, but for many Mom...
Key Trends for Brands and Marketers

   •   Facilitating
Mom
Connectivity
Deepens
Brand
Loyalty:
Moms

       increasingly...


    o Key
Take­Away:
By
facilitating
connectivity
and
community
on
these

      platforms,
brands
can
build
tremendous
a...
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How Moms Socialize Online - Implications for Brands

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Mom Central Consulting recently released survey results pointing to a new trend in online interactions between Moms. The survey results show that today’s Mom lives a life devoid of strong personal relationships and friends, leaving her lonely, isolated, and feeling unsupported at home.

The survey results have clear implications for brands looking to engage Moms, offering insight into their mindset and online behaviors. According to Stacy DeBroff, CEO of Mom Central Consulting, brands should use the findings on Mom isolation and how Moms socialize online to structure new campaigns that help Moms form the bonds they seek while strengthening loyalty to the brand. This document further outlines additional implications and Mom Central Consulting's recommendations.

Survey results can be found here: http://www.slideshare.net/thopeross/why-moms-socialize-online

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How Moms Socialize Online - Implications for Brands

  1. 1. “How
Moms
Socialize
Online”
 Mom
Central
Consulting
2009
Survey
Implications

 
 Mom
Central
Consulting,
the
premiere
firm
specializing
in
Marketing
to
Moms
 recently
released
results
of
a
survey
conducted
to
understand
Moms’
social
habits
 online.
More
than
1,300
Moms
answered
an
in‐depth
questionnaire
about
their
 online
and
offline
behaviors
–
specifically
focusing
on
their
attitudes
towards
 networking,
community,
and
sense
of
self.
The
data
reveal
that
Moms
of
all
ages
are
 lonely
and
are
using
the
Internet
to
form
new
friendships
based
on
shared
interests,
 life
events,
and
parenting
support.

 
 
 Key
Mom
Trends
 • Today’s
Moms
Lack
a
Best
Friend
or
Strong
Inner
Circle:
With
daily
 activities
including
meetings,
carpools,
meal
preparation
and
eldercare,
 today’s
Moms
maintain
increasingly
hectic
schedules.
Unfortunately,
this
 frenzied
pace
and
lack
of
personal
time
often
means
the
deterioration
of
 Moms’
inner
circle
and
the
lack
of
a
best
friend,
resulting
in
loneliness
and
 isolation.
Increasingly,
Moms
find
themselves
in
online
communities
–
often
 at
odd
hours
when
they
have
a
moment
alone
–
searching
for
relationships
 and
connections:
 o 40% do not have a friend with whom they feel they can share everything. o 4 out of 5 moms feel they do not have enough friends in their lives. o 70% of Moms talk to other moms online in forums or communities. o 61% have made a new friend online in the last year. o 61% want to make new friends. • Tough Transition Times for Moms with Young Kids and Moms with Teens: Loneliness and isolation peak for Moms with young kids (0 to 5) and older kids (14-18), indicating that transition times prove tough for both new and experienced Moms. For Moms with young kids, loneliness often occurs when Moms exit the traditional workforce, leave behind workplace friends, and transition to a new and potentially isolating life with infants and young children without the support of a familiar social structure. In addition, feelings of isolation combine with financial anxiety when growing families learn to live on one income in today’s shaky economy. Likewise, loneliness and isolation hit older Moms, whose role as the primary caregiver wanes as their high-school-age kids forge new independence
  2. 2. and rely less on Moms for daily care and attention. Questions centering around “Now what?” and “What’s Next?” abound from these Moms, as they identify their next chapter. Online friends and communities provide a crucial social network for both new and experienced Moms as they transition to the next phase in their lives. o 55% feel their partner does not talk enough with them. o 41% of Moms are loneliest when their child/children are 0 to 2 years, with 67% lonely during 0 to 5 years. o 61% want to make new friends. o Only 19% of Moms are raising their children in the community in which they were raised. o Less than 50% live near family members. o Lasting
Offline
Connections
with
Online
Beginnings:
While
at
first
glance,
 online
relationships
may
seem
fleeting
and
tenuous,
Moms
today
share
 another
story.
Moms
can
naturally
and
easily
find
other
Moms
online
who
 share
their
passions
and
particular
interests,
who
also
have
children
of
 similar
ages.
These
relationships
have
started
migrating
offline
and
prove
 that
virtual
friends
have
real
life
“stickiness:”
 
 o In fact, 34% of Moms say their online friends now count as lasting offline friends. o 70% of Moms talk to other moms online in forums or communities. o 61% have made a new friend online in the last year. o 1 in 3 moms who have made friends online tell their online friends things they do not share with offline friends. o 34% of moms who have made friends online have turned an online friendship into a lasting offline one. • 1950s
Mom
Isolation
Redux:
Loneliness.
Isolation.
Lack
of
support.
Sound
 familiar?
Based
on
a
geographic
distance
from
family,
deteriorating
sources
 of
everyday
support,
isolation
from
busy
neighbors
and
unsympathetic
co‐ workers,
and
perceived
lack
of
support
from
partners,
today’s
Moms
face
a
 real
challenge
in
emotional
satisfaction
not
seen
since
the
1950s.
Yet
 Millennium
Moms
have
technology
at
their
fingertips
–
social
networking
 sites,
microblogging,
SmartPhones,
–
that
offer
the
ability
online
to
forge
new
 –
and
surprisingly
lasting
–
offline
friendships.
 
 o 70% of Moms talk to other moms online in forums or communities. o 55% feel their partner does not talk enough with them. o 54% don’t feel that their spouse shares enough of the parenting responsibilities.
  3. 3. • Resurgence of Mom Cliques: Most Moms first experienced cliques somewhere back in the fifth grade, but for many Moms they are back and often result in loneliness and isolation in adulthood. Since only 19% of Moms live in the communities in which they were raised, a majority of women must forge new ground and break into established neighborhoods where all Moms seemingly know one another and have pre-set social patterns (clubs, exercise classes, playgroups, etc.). In addition, school communities often seem overwhelming to new families, since Moms with children already in the school system appear to all know one another. As a result, online communities often appear as an easier way for Moms to make friends, especially since the stakes don’t seem quite as high or as personal. o 70% of Moms talk to other moms online in forums or communities. o 61% have made a new friend online in the last year. o 1 in 3 moms want to meet other Moms in their communities. o 34% of moms who have made friends online have turned an online friendship into a lasting offline one. • Working Mom Woes: While women now hold nearly 50% of U.S. jobs, loneliness and isolation often result for Working Moms — who don’t quite fit into the social mix either at home or at work. By the very nature of their schedules, Working Moms find it difficult to take part in existing social opportunities with other neighborhood Moms — class field trips, playgroups, exercise classes, or school committee work. Yet at-work friendships prove difficult for Working Moms who must maximize office productivity in order to make day-care or after- school pick-up, and typically decline post-work socializing or networking opportunities. Moreover, more than 80% of Moms feel they do not get enough support from co-workers. While not comfortable in either the at-work or at-home social networks, the online community offers Working Moms an opportunity to socialize on their own terms, at a time that works for them. o 54% don’t feel that their spouse shares enough of the parenting responsibilities. o 40% do not have a friend with whom they feel they can share everything. o 4 out of 5 moms feel they do not have enough friends in their lives.
  4. 4. Key Trends for Brands and Marketers • Facilitating
Mom
Connectivity
Deepens
Brand
Loyalty:
Moms
 increasingly
turn
online
to
connect
with
like‐minded
Moms
–
whether
their
 passions
be
toddlers,
green
living,
twins,
organic
foods,
losing
weight,
or
 specific
products
or
services.
Moms
actively
seek
out
friendships
online
to
fill
 the
void
of
a
lack
of
best
friend
or
strong
inner
circle,
40%
of
Moms
lack
a
 best
friend
and
61%
turn
to
online
connections
for
lasting
offline
friendships.
 Brands
now
have
an
opportunity
to
pull
Moms
together
in
forums
with
 others
who
share
their
interests.
The
result?
Increasing
loyalty
to
brands
that
 facilitate
Mom‐to‐Mom
connectivity.
 
 o Key
Take­Away:
More
than
ever,
brands
should
focus
on
providing
 Moms
with
opportunities
for
connectivity,
both
online
and
offline,
 rather
than
just
information,
expertise
or
coupons.
Tactics
–
such
as
 forming
Mom
Ambassador
programs
–
offer
Moms
significant
 opportunities
to
build
relationships
and
leads
them
to
effusively
 thank
the
brand
for
bringing
them
together.
 
 
 • Geo­Targeted
Local
Gatherings:
With
the
frenzied
pace
of
today’s
Moms,
 many
women
find
that
friendships
and
relationships
often
fall
to
the
wayside.
 With
just
19%
of
Moms
living
in
the
community
where
they
grew
up,
Moms
 desperately
seek
new
connections.
Over
1
in
3
Moms
want
to
meet
more
 Moms
in
their
community.
Moms
struggle
to
make
connections
–
58%
of
 Moms
report
experiencing
loneliness
in
the
past
month,
and
4
out
of
5
Moms
 need
more
friends
in
their
lives.
Offline
events
give
Moms
the
opportunity
to
 meet
fellow
Moms
they
know
from
online
communities.
Brands
can
leverage
 this
need
–
as
well
as
extend
the
reach
of
their
national
programs
–
by
taking
 a
geo‐targeted
approach
to
programs
focused
on
Moms,
as
well
as
provide
 Moms
with
offline
opportunities
to
connect.

 
 o Key
Take­Away:
In
developing
Mom‐focused
consumer
campaigns,
 brands
have
to
think
locally
while
reaching
globally.
Robust
geo‐ targeted
programs
–
with
both
online
and
offline
components
–
enable
 Moms
to
relate
brands
to
their
daily
lives,
and
offline
events
help
 them
build
local
relationships
and
connections
with
fellow
Moms
in
 their
communities.
Brands
should
create
an
offline
component
for
all
 online
programs,
letting
Moms
know
ample
opportunities
exist
for
 interaction
and
connectivity.
Examples
could
include
blogger
retreats,
 kick‐off
receptions,
and
special
events
or
parties.
 
 
 • Rise
in
Social
Network
Participation
Due
to
Friendship
Seeking:
Millions
 of
Moms
turn
to
sites
like
Gather.com
(Mom
groups),
along
with
Twitter
 (shared
passions
or
goals),
Facebook
(reconnecting
with
old
friends
and
 keeping
new
friends
in
what
we
at
Mom
Central
call
the
“Family
Life
Loop”),
 and
Linked‐In
(business‐related)
for
connectivity.


  5. 5. 
 o Key
Take­Away:
By
facilitating
connectivity
and
community
on
these
 platforms,
brands
can
build
tremendous
and
lasting
loyalty
among
 their
Mom
brand
enthusiasts.

 
 
 For
a
copy
of
this
research
study,
please
contact
Tracey
Hope‐Ross,
VP
Social
 Media
and
Research
:

tracey@momcentral.com

or
617‐244‐3002
 
 To
find
out
how
brands
can
effectively
utilize
these
insights
please
contact
 Stacy
DeBroff,
CEO
at
stacy@momcentral.com

or
617‐244‐3002.



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