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THE FUTURE OF WORK
STARTS WITH CULTURE
A conversation about flexibility and remote work
... and the cultures that support ...
The Business Learning Institute | 1
Table of Contents
Executive summary......................................................
Culture, in
fact, drives
growth in every
corner of our
organizations.
The Business Learning Institute | 3
Executive Summary
Changes in the ways we work — from workplace redesigns and flexible ...
4 | The Future of Work Starts With Culture
Background
Great minds really do think alike.
In 2016, the Maryland Association...
The Business Learning Institute | 5
Maryland North Carolina Virginia
1. Expand value-
added services
Create a workforce to...
6 | The Future of Work Starts With Culture
Flexibility is meaningless without
a culture to support it
With that end in min...
The Business Learning Institute | 7
That, however, is as far as the conversation about remote work went. In one sentence,
...
8 | The Future of Work Starts With Culture
Corporate culture
is defined as the
shared values,
attitudes,
standards,
and be...
The Business Learning Institute | 9
The characteristics of a great culture
Opinions differ, of course, but most experts ag...
10 | The Future of Work Starts With Culture
Dan Pink, one of the world’s foremost business thinkers and best-selling autho...
The Business Learning Institute | 11
The best corporate
cultures are geared
toward many of these
traits, including vision,...
12 | The Future of Work Starts With Culture
Using lists like these as a starting point, the Leadership Academy graduates b...
The Business Learning Institute | 13
The benefits of a great culture
Organizations that are intentional about building str...
14 | The Future of Work Starts With Culture
There’s nothing easy about any of this, of course. If it were easy, every orga...
The Business Learning Institute | 15
On their surface, challenges look like bad things. They’re not. Lurking just beneath ...
16 | The Future of Work Starts With Culture
After years of working with many of the nation’s top 300 CPA firms and public-...
The Business Learning Institute | 17
The 200-plus CPA firms we
surveyed in the past year
connected on only
68 percent of t...
18 | The Future of Work Starts With Culture
New tools help build
future-focused cultures
Video conferencing, remote
collab...
The Business Learning Institute | 19
•	 Apple iCloud
Apple.com/iCloud
Shared calendars
•	 Google Calendar
Google.com/calen...
20 | The Future of Work Starts With Culture
The bottom line
Building a mobile-ready and flexible work
environment is a nob...
The Business Learning Institute | 21
Resources
What Got You Here Won’t Get You There: Maryland’s Young CPAs Create a Visio...
22 | The Future of Work Starts With Culture
Roster of participants
Erica Beaumont, CPA		 Arthur F. Bell Jr. and Associates...
The Business Learning Institute | 23
Bill Sheridan is a knowledge hunter, content curator, lifelong
learner, and the Maryl...
24 | The Future of Work Starts With Culture
ABOUT THE BUSINESS LEARNING INSTITUTE
The Business Learning Institute is the l...
The Business Learning Institute | 25
© 2017 Maryland Association of CPAs, Inc.
All rights reserved. Published 2017
Printed...
The Future of Work Starts with Culture - a BLI Report
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The Future of Work Starts with Culture - a BLI Report

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Peter Drucker famously said, "Culture eats Strategy for Breakfast." Tom Peters said that "Hard is Soft and Soft his Hard" referencing his research that the intangibles of culture always beat the hard stuff of strategy and metrics.

What follows is a report from 2017 BLI-MACPA and AICPA Leadership Academies about the perspectives of emerging leaders on what makes a great culture. While our conversation started with a common pattern that showed up in every leadership academy class over the past five years - leading the remote workforce and flexibility, it quickly morphed when Barrett Young made this profound observation, "To successfully implement remote, flexible, and collaborative work strategies, we must first ensure that such strategies are aligned with our cultures."

That changed the entire conversation to answer questions like what defines a great culture, what are the barriers that get in the way, and what are some tools and techniques that can help shape and accelerate a future that people want to work in.

Special Thanks to our task force of Leadership Academy Alumni who made this paper possible:

Erica Beaumont, CPA
Samantha Bowling, CPA
Kelly DeRose, CPA
Jason Friedman, CPA Lauri Funk, CPA
Evan Hacker, CPA
Alina Korsak, CPA
Diane Mason, CPA
Adam Meier, CPA
Aaron Michael, CPA
Christa Hood, CPA
Norma Richmond, CPA
Timothy Samuel, CPA
William Thomas, CPA
Susanne Wolfe, CPA
Barrett Young, CPA

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The Future of Work Starts with Culture - a BLI Report

  1. 1. THE FUTURE OF WORK STARTS WITH CULTURE A conversation about flexibility and remote work ... and the cultures that support them A report from the 2017 MACPA / BLI / AICPA Leadership Academies
  2. 2. The Business Learning Institute | 1 Table of Contents Executive summary............................................................................................................................. 3 Background......................................................................................................................................... 4 Flexibility is meaningless without a culture to support it.................................................................... 6 The characteristics of a great culture.................................................................................................. 9 The benefits of a great culture.......................................................................................................... 13 Obstacles and challenges................................................................................................................. 14 Turning challenges into opportunities.............................................................................................. 15 Creating a ‘magnetic organization’................................................................................................... 16 New tools help build future-focused cultures................................................................................... 18 The bottom line................................................................................................................................. 20 Resources.......................................................................................................................................... 21 Roster of participants........................................................................................................................ 22 About Bill Sheridan, Report Author.................................................................................................. 23 MACPA & BLI.................................................................................................................................... 24 A conversation about flexibility and remote work ... and the cultures that support them THE FUTURE OF WORK STARTS WITH CULTURE
  3. 3. Culture, in fact, drives growth in every corner of our organizations.
  4. 4. The Business Learning Institute | 3 Executive Summary Changes in the ways we work — from workplace redesigns and flexible schedules to remote working and collaborative strategies — must be top-of-mind and happen quickly if business leaders hope to attract and retain the best and brightest talent available, next-generation CPA leaders say. Implementing those changes, though, requires more than new policies and open-office blueprints. It requires a fundamental re-examination of our organizations' cultures. What do we, as organizations, believe? Why do we do what we do? What is our purpose and passion? To successfully implement remote, flexible, and collaborative work strategies, we must first ensure that such strategies are aligned with our cultures. “Characteristics of a good remote environment and office culture will expose the flaws that are present in your existing culture,” said Barrett Young, founder of the advisory firm The Green Abacus and a former member of the Maryland Association of CPAs’ Board of Directors. Conversely, the right culture will drive your success as a remote, flexible, collaborative organization. The bottom line: Building a remote and flexible strategy that works means building the right culture. Culture, in fact, drives growth in every corner of our organizations.
  5. 5. 4 | The Future of Work Starts With Culture Background Great minds really do think alike. In 2016, the Maryland Association of CPAs and the Business Learning Institute facilitated three separate CPA Leadership Academies — in Maryland, in Virginia on behalf of the Virginia Society of CPAs, and in North Carolina on behalf of the American Institute of CPAs. The Academies are designed to teach young professionals the skills they will need to lead their organizations and the profession into the future. The facilitated discussions at each Leadership Academy included an exercise in which participants collaborated to identify the biggest trends that will impact the CPA profession in years to come. The results from the three Academies were striking, with each group listing mobile / remote work strategies at or near the top of its list of top trends in the profession. Maryland North Carolina Virginia 1. Remote workforce Mobile workforce / generational changes Cybersecurity 2. Artificial intelligence Big Data / predictive analytics Redefined workplace / flexibility and collaboration 3. Presidential election Increase in on-demand and real-time data for customers Changes in customer behaviors toward e-commerce 4. Social media “Uber-ization” and DIY mentality in customers Baby boomers retiring / succession issues 5. Globalization / convergence of international standards Political uncertainty / changes in regulatory environment Shift to value-added services / moving up the value chain 6. Cloud / data security Automation in finance (AI and cognitive computing) 7. Need for proactive advisors Global competition and connectivity Top future trends for the CPA profession
  6. 6. The Business Learning Institute | 5 Maryland North Carolina Virginia 1. Expand value- added services Create a workforce toolkit to support professional adaptation and acceptance of progressive policies and thinking. Take advantage of increasing automation, from efficiency to AI. 2. Leverage technology for efficiency and insight Shift focus to putting employees first. Support workplace flexibility and work-life balance. 3. Become a talent magnet Create alternate billing practices. Create dynamic workplaces that support custom careers and development. 4. Build the bridge for succession planning Educate accountants on the importance of relationships. Focus on succession and leadership transition. 5. Develop competency, career- path, and promotion plans. Focus on becoming “the employer of choice.” 6. Support the blending of IT and CPA functions. As employers, commit ourselves to understanding generational needs. 7. Expand value-added services. High-leverage opportunities for the CPA profession Each group then identified the top opportunities embedded in these future trends — in other words, ways in which CPAs can use these trends to position their organizations for future growth. Again, the results among the three groups were strikingly similar. As shown in gray above, many of the opportunities identified by these three groups focused sharply on workplace strategies, flexibility, talent recruitment, and career development, serving as further evidence of the importance that future CPA leaders place on people and relationships. Clearly, the time had come to have some extended conversations about how to create effective, non-traditional workplace strategies and build mobile / remote workforces.
  7. 7. 6 | The Future of Work Starts With Culture Flexibility is meaningless without a culture to support it With that end in mind, the MACPA invited participants from each of the 2016 Leadership Academies to take part in a day-long discussion about the future of work. Seventeen Leadership Academy graduates accepted the invitation, including two MACPA board members. The discussion was facilitated by the MACPA’s Tom Hood, Bill Sheridan, Rebekah Brown, and Jackie Brown. From the beginning, it was clear the participants had come to share and gather ideas about flexible work arrangements. During introductions, participants were asked why they had agreed to participate. Their answers told the story: • “Stealing good ideas for remote and virtual working.” • “Reducing the stigma around remote working.” • “Catching up and setting policy around remote work.” • “Making sure that firms and companies get this.” • “Addressing the concerns of partners and finding ideas for scheduling and how to execute.”
  8. 8. The Business Learning Institute | 7 That, however, is as far as the conversation about remote work went. In one sentence, Leadership Academy graduate and former MACPA board member Barrett Young steered the conversation in a new direction: “Characteristics of a good remote environment and office culture will expose the flaws that are present in your existing culture.” In other words, Young said, all of the flexibility in the world won’t matter if your culture isn’t built to support it. A recent study from Columbia Business School and Duke University supports that notion. Led by Columbia University accounting professor Shiva Rajgopal, the study solicited responses from more than 1,400 CEOs and CFOs in North America over a 13-month period ending in October 2015. “Overwhelmingly,” writes Forbes reporter Susan Adams, “the executives said that healthy corporate culture is essential for a company to thrive.” Among the study’s findings: • More than 90 percent of executives surveyed say culture is important at their organizations. • More than 90 percent believe that improving their corporate cultures will improve their organizations’ value. • More than half say corporate culture “influences productivity, creativity, profitability, firm value, and growth rates,” writes Adams. • And yet only 15 percent say their organization’s culture is where it needs to be. Clearly, corporate culture offers huge potential for organizations that get it right. Equally clear is the fact that very few organizations have cultures that work... if they have a culture at all. From that point on, the conversation among the Leadership Academy participants was geared toward answering three fundamental questions: 1. What are the characteristics of a great corporate culture? 2. What are the obstacles and challenges that stand in the way of our efforts to build a great culture? 3. What opportunities do those obstacles and challenges present to us?
  9. 9. 8 | The Future of Work Starts With Culture Corporate culture is defined as the shared values, attitudes, standards, and beliefs that characterize an organization and guide its practices.
  10. 10. The Business Learning Institute | 9 The characteristics of a great culture Opinions differ, of course, but most experts agree on one thing: “Culture” doesn’t mean free snacks and foosball. To borrow from a couple of different sources, corporate culture is defined as the shared values, attitudes, standards, and beliefs that characterize an organization and guide its practices. But what does a truly great corporate culture look like? John Coleman, a Harvard Business Review contributor and co-author of the book Passion and Purpose: Stories from the Best and Brightest Young Business Leaders, says the best corporate cultures share six key characteristics: 1. Vision: “A great culture starts with a vision or mission statement,” Coleman writes. “These simple turns of phrase guide a company’s values and provide it with purpose. That purpose, in turn, orients every decision employees make.” 2. Values: “While a vision articulates a company’s purpose, values offer a set of guidelines on the behaviors and mindsets needed to achieve that vision,” Coleman writes. “...The originality of those values is less important than their authenticity." 3. Practices: Says Coleman: “Values are of little importance unless they are enshrined in a company’s practices. If an organization professes, ‘people are our greatest asset,’ it should also be ready to invest in people in visible ways.” 4. People: “No company can build a coherent culture without people who either share its core values or possess the willingness and ability to embrace those values,” writes Coleman. 5. Narrative: “Any organization has a unique history — a unique story,” Coleman says. “And the ability to unearth that history and craft it into a narrative is a core element of culture creation.” 6. Place: “Place shapes culture,” Coleman writes. “Open architecture is more conducive to certain office behaviors, like collaboration. Certain cities and countries have local cultures that may reinforce or contradict the culture a firm is trying to create. Place — whether geography, architecture, or aesthetic design — impacts the values and behaviors of people in a workplace.”
  11. 11. 10 | The Future of Work Starts With Culture Dan Pink, one of the world’s foremost business thinkers and best-selling author of A Whole New Mind and Drive, ties culture directly to employee engagement. According to Pink, organizations with great cultures engage their employees by providing them with three key elements of personal satisfaction and growth: 1. Autonomy: Great cultures give their people space to do their work on their own terms. Most people want to do great work, Pink says. Give them a job to do, get out of their way, and let them do it. 2. Mastery: Your people want to learn new skills. They want to improve. They want to stay relevant and get better at what they do. Give them the opportunities to do so. Give them access to the resources that will help them learn new skills so they can grow. 3. Purpose: More than anything else, employees say they want to do work that has meaning and is important. That purpose has to be about more than just making money; it has to affect some change in the world.
  12. 12. The Business Learning Institute | 11 The best corporate cultures are geared toward many of these traits, including vision, values, leadership, and especially people -- staff members in particular and, to a lesser extent, to clients and customers. Indeed, the best corporate cultures are geared toward many of these traits, including vision, values, leadership, and especially people -- staff members in particular and, to a lesser extent, to clients and customers. Consider these quotes from employees who work for the companies on Business Insider’s list of the 25 best corporate cultures: • From NetApp: “Supportive management. Company culture is great. Good ideas and work are appreciated.” • From Walt Disney Company: “Fantastic heritage, pride and culture, wonderful community, amazing growth opportunities, creative atmosphere.” • From Procter and Gamble: “Procter and Gamble gives fantastic training and truly wants you to succeed as an individual.” • From Citrix: “Culture and good values define who we are as a company. There is an ongoing commitment to improve the customer journey and ensure our product strategy is well defined.” From Apple: “Everyone shares a common goal to make the best products for the consumer, and it shows in most every conversation you have.” • From Intuit: “Top leaders show by decisions and actions that they believe in the top value of ‘integrity without compromise.’ ” • From Twitter: “I love how the 10 core values drive the company to always be better.”
  13. 13. 12 | The Future of Work Starts With Culture Using lists like these as a starting point, the Leadership Academy graduates brainstormed their own list of cultural characteristics. Here are the traits they say define a great corporate culture: 1. Vision: A direction that is shared by all members of the team, one that is defined by clear values, a common understanding, and consistency of words and actions. 2. A focus on the future: All team members are intentional about identifying future trends and looking for opportunities to take advantage of them. The more future- focused we are, the more we can help our clients become future-focused as well. 3. Transparency: Communication is clear, open, and honest at all levels. 4. Collaboration and teamwork: Everyone’s ideas are valued, and everyone is expected to contribute. Inclusion and diversity of thought are the ultimate goals. 5. Career development: Each team member follows a clearly defined career path. Those career paths identify the skills needed for growth and a structured curriculum of continuous learning that will teach those skills at every level. 6. Adaptability and flexibility: The organization’s strategies — and even its business model — are fluid and easily adaptable to a rapidly changing business environment. 7. A focus on results: The ultimate goal is exceptional work that pleases the clients. Where you do that work or how much time you spend doing it doesn’t matter. 8. Wellness: Taking care of our organization and our clients starts with taking care of ourselves. We can’t do good work unless our minds and bodies are well. Vision A focus on the future TransparencyCollaboration and teamwork Career development Adaptability and flexibility A focus on resultsWellness
  14. 14. The Business Learning Institute | 13 The benefits of a great culture Organizations that are intentional about building strong cultures that feature the traits above will enjoy a number of advantages over their competitors, according to the Leadership Academy participants. Those benefits include: • Greater profitability and, as a result, greater sustainability. • Excellent customer and client service. • Increased ability to recruit and retain top talent. • Increased employee engagement. • Increased innovation. • The ability to build intellectual property and capital. Such benefits dovetail with research from some of the business world’s most renowned thought leaders. According to Jim Collins, organizations that align their strategies with culture and purpose outperform their competition by an estimated 1,500 percent. Indeed, there’s nothing touchy-feeling about corporate culture at all. There are real bottom-line consequences at play here, and the organizations that get it right will have a decided advantage over those that don’t.
  15. 15. 14 | The Future of Work Starts With Culture There’s nothing easy about any of this, of course. If it were easy, every organization would have a great culture. With that in mind, the Leadership Academy participants outlined some of the most significant obstacles and challenges that organizations face as they try to build great corporate cultures. They include: • SALY: That’s CPA talk for “same as last year.” It’s a mindset that says, “We’ve always done it this way, so why change?” It signifies a fear or unwillingness to change. • Time: We’re busier than ever … or at least we believe we are. Our challenge is finding the capacity to do this important work. • Follow-through: Organizations are notorious for spending a lot of time and effort brainstorming ideas for how to do important work like this ... and then doing nothing. The challenge is follow-through. Whether it’s lack of a blueprint, fear of failure, or the gravity of “busy-ness,” implementing the changes we want to make is easier said than done. • Financial costs: Money is always an easy excuse for not doing new things. • No support from leadership: Without support from the top, important new initiatives rarely succeed. Seventy percent of executives who took part in the Columbia Business School / Duke study on culture agree with the statement, “Leadership needs to spend more time to develop the culture.” Cultural initiatives have little chance of succeeding without the support of leadership. • Staffing issues: Not everyone on your team will fit the culture you want to create. There are real time and financial burdens involved in replacing disengaged staff members. • Encouragement / rewards: Organizations that fail in this type of work often fail to encourage team members to join them on this journey. If there is no encouragement or reward for self-development, there will likely be little buy-in from staff. If it were easy, every organization would have a great culture. Obstacles and challenges
  16. 16. The Business Learning Institute | 15 On their surface, challenges look like bad things. They’re not. Lurking just beneath each challenge’s surface are scores of opportunities — opportunities to solve big problems, to better serve our clients, and to set ourselves apart from our competition. Corporate culture is no different. Building a great culture isn’t easy, but every challenge that stands in our way also presents opportunities to thrive amid the chaos, differentiate ourselves, and help our organizations grow. After identifying the challenges that keep us from building great cultures, the Leadership Academy graduates spent time searching for the opportunities that those challenges present. Here’s what they found: Turning challenges into opportunities SALY / unwillingness to change Explain and understand the importance of this change, and help your team understand the importance as well. Buy-in from your entire team will make them want to change. Time Hire or retrain a leader to be a champion of change. Leadership-driven change helps convince our teams of what’s important … and what we need to spend our time on. Follow-through Empowerment and accountability. Give your team permission to work on the things that will build a great culture, and then hold them accountable for doing that important work. Financial costs Focus not on ROI, but rather on RONI — the risk of not investing. And budget for culture. Spend the money that great cultures demand. No support from leadership Look to other industries for guidance; share success stories from other firms; and start below the leadership level — get buy-in from the rest of the staff first and let them convince leadership. Staffing issues Hire for culture first — you can teach new team members the technical skills they need to do their jobs, but you can’t teach them to be good cultural fits. Constantly evaluate how your team promotes your culture. And adopt an “always in beta” mindset. Continually try new things and reward those who do. Encouragement / rewards Make use of frameworks and tools like surveys, team strengths and values, and Net Promoter Scores, which gauge the likelihood that people will recommend your organization’s culture to others. And be sure to reward the good work of your culture’s evangelists. Challenges Opportunities
  17. 17. 16 | The Future of Work Starts With Culture After years of working with many of the nation’s top 300 CPA firms and public-company finance teams, the Business Learning Institute has created a “Magnetic Organization Framework” — a matrix of the 16 most crucial characteristics for recruiting, retaining, and engaging top talent within the accounting and finance profession. This four-by- four matrix lists these characteristics under four key headings — purpose, leadership, culture, and inspiration. According to our BLI research, these characteristics are most likely to distinguish high- performing finance teams from their competitors — and are the most difficult to obtain. In fact, the 200-plus CPA firms we surveyed in the past year connected on only 68 percent of these characteristics. If this were high school, that would barely earn them a passing grade. Obviously, more work must be done. Here are the characteristics that separate “magnetic” accounting and finance teams from the rest of the pack. Creating a ‘magnetic organization’ Purpose-driven Great leadership Culture of growth Inspiring workplace Vision-, purpose- and values-based; based on mutual respect Transparent and inspirational leadership Learning culture — self and formal development Flexible and open work environment Focus on strengths and positivity Build consensus, commitment and trust Career and growth orientation — career paths Work / life integration Inclusive and diverse Leadership development at all levels Customer and relationship focused Accountability, coaching and feedback High performance / insights to action Anticipatory and proactive Collaborative and team-based Effective technology tools / mobile Creating the magnetic accounting and finance team
  18. 18. The Business Learning Institute | 17 The 200-plus CPA firms we surveyed in the past year connected on only 68 percent of these characteristics.
  19. 19. 18 | The Future of Work Starts With Culture New tools help build future-focused cultures Video conferencing, remote collaboration, and virtual meetings: • Skype for Business Skype.com/en/business/skype-for- business • Google Hangouts Hangouts.google.com • Zoom Zoom.us • GoToMeeting Gotomeeting.com • JoinMe Join.me Online document sharing and collaboration • Office365 Products.office.com/Microsoft/ Business • G Suite by Google Gsuite.google.com/apps • Dropbox DropBox.com • Box Box.com • Microsoft OneDrive Onedrive.live.com Building a vibrant, future-focused, magnetic culture starts with leadership, people, and strategy, but the right tools can be a huge help as well. Leadership Academy participants shared some of their favorite tools for boosting productivity, collaboration, and innovation within their organizations. Among those tools are the following:
  20. 20. The Business Learning Institute | 19 • Apple iCloud Apple.com/iCloud Shared calendars • Google Calendar Google.com/calendar • Microsoft Outlook Outlook.Live.com Appointment scheduling software • YouCanBookMe YouCanBook.me • Calendly Calendly.com • SimplyBook.me SimplyBook.me • Appointlet Appointlet.com Virtualization • Citrix Citrix.com Integrated messaging • Slack Slack.com • Yammer Yammer.com • Workplace by Facebook Workplace.fb.com • Internal blogs Collaborative notes • Evernote Evernote.com • Microsoft OneNote OneNote.com • Microsoft Sharepoint products.office.com/en-us/ sharepoint/collaboration Project / practice management • Practice CS tax.thomsonreuters.com/cs- professional-suite/practice-cs/ • Karbon KarbonHQ.com • Asana Asana.com • Sprint.ly Sprint.ly • Workboard Workboard.com • Basecamp Basecamp.com Single sign-on / password managers • LastPass LastPass.com • OnePass Onepass.thomsonreuters.com
  21. 21. 20 | The Future of Work Starts With Culture The bottom line Building a mobile-ready and flexible work environment is a noble cause, and one that will serve your people and your organization well. But building that environment and making it work is more complicated than setting up a couple of remote offices and finding the best teleconferencing solution. It means building a culture that supports a flexible environment for your entire team -- a culture that is fluid enough to change as work itself changes. Building a culture like that requires strategic thinking, anticipation, and early-adopter mindset, and a willingness to accept that change is the only constant. Flexible work is the byproduct of a culture that makes it possible. Culture comes first. Build the right culture, and your work environment will meet the needs of all of your employees. Flexible work is the byproduct of a culture that makes it possible.
  22. 22. The Business Learning Institute | 21 Resources What Got You Here Won’t Get You There: Maryland’s Young CPAs Create a Vision of the Profession’s Future (2011 MACPA whitepaper) http://www.slideshare.net/thoodcpa/cpa-leadership-in-the-future Six Components of a Great Corporate Culture (Harvard Business Review) https://hbr.org/2013/05/six-components-of-culture Corporate Culture Matters A Lot, Says New Study (Forbes) http://www.forbes.com/sites/susanadams/2015/11/12/corporate-culture-matters-says- new-study/#337ee7e6d806 Corporate Culture: It’s More Than Free Beer and Pizza (Forbes) http://www.forbes.com/sites/lizryan/2016/12/15/corporate-culture-its-more-than-free- beer-and-pizza/ The 25 Most Enjoyable Companies To Work For (Business Insider) http://www.businessinsider.com/25-best-corporate-cultures-2014-8 Corporate Culture (Inc.com) http://www.inc.com/encyclopedia/corporate-culture.html What is corporate culture? (WhatIs.com) http://whatis.techtarget.com/definition/corporate-culture
  23. 23. 22 | The Future of Work Starts With Culture Roster of participants Erica Beaumont, CPA Arthur F. Bell Jr. and Associates Samantha Bowling, CPA Garbelman Winslow, CPAs Kelly DeRose, CPA Gary R. Bozel and Associates Jason Friedman, CPA Arthur F. Bell Jr. and Associates Lauri Funk, CPA Arthur F. Bell Jr. and Associates Evan Hacker, CPA OH Partners CPAs Alina Korsak, CPA Melanson Heath Diane Mason, CPA Exelon Generation Adam Meier, CPA PBMares CPAs and Consultants Aaron Michael, CPA Arthur F. Bell Jr. and Associates Christa Hood, CPA Askey, Askey & Associates, CPAs Norma Richmond, CPA Arthur F. Bell Jr. and Associates Timothy Samuel, CPA Bridgeway Community Church William Thomas, CPA Bond Beebe Accountants and Advisors Susanne Wolfe, CPA Arthur F. Bell Jr. and Associates Barrett Young, CPA The Green Abacus Tom Hood, CPA Executive Director Jackie Brown Deputy Executive Director Bill Sheridan Chief Communications Officer Rebekah Brown, CPA Manager, Membership Development Edith Orenstein Associate Editor MACPA / BLI STAFF
  24. 24. The Business Learning Institute | 23 Bill Sheridan is a knowledge hunter, content curator, lifelong learner, and the Maryland Association of CPAs’ chief communications officer, editor, and resident social media cheerleader. He is the creator and co-author of the association’s acclaimed blog, CPA Success. Mr. Sheridan also writes and produces the MACPA’s podcast, CPA Spotlight, and manages the association’s numerous social networks. All of that socializing is paying off. CPA Success has appeared on numerous “top accounting blogs” lists, and Mr. Sheridan’s Klout score has earned him the No. 2 spot on SavvySME’s list of the top accounting influ- encers in the world. Mr. Sheridan speaks regularly to CPAs and association groups on the strategic uses of social media and the future of communication, collaboration and education. He has presented at the National Association of State Boards of Accountancy’s 2011 CPE Conference and its 2011 International Conference; the AICPA’s inaugural Digital CPA Conference in 2012; and the first-ever CCH Small Firms Conference, also in 2012. He delivers frequent presentations on behalf of the Business Learning Institute and is a certified Insights to Action facilitator. A journalist by trade, Mr. Sheridan oversees the MACPA’s online and print content. His articles about the MACPA and the CPA profession have appeared in the Journal of Accountancy, Associations Now and SmartCEO. He is a graduate of the State University of New York at Buffalo. In 2010, he earned the Certified Association Executive designation from the American Society of Association Executives. Mr. Sheridan is inspired by and in awe of his wife, Alison, and their daughter, Molly. They live in St. Louis, Mo. About Bill Sheridan, Report Author ABOUT BILL SHERIDAN, REPORT AUTHOR
  25. 25. 24 | The Future of Work Starts With Culture ABOUT THE BUSINESS LEARNING INSTITUTE The Business Learning Institute is the leading talent-development organization for CPAs, finance, and accounting professionals in the United States. It provides customized, competency-based curriculums and a portfolio of “success skills” and technical programs designed for the finance and accounting profession. Founded in 1999 by the Maryland Association of CPAs, the BLI is an innovation and learning center that facilitates the development and sharing of competencies and strategic knowledge required for leadership in today's rapidly changing business environment. For more information, visit www.BLIonline.org. Follow the BLI on Twitter at www.Twitter.com/BLIonline. ABOUT THE MARYLAND ASSOCIATION OF CPAs The Maryland Association of CPAs exists to help CPAs connect with each other in strategic ways, to protect our members’ interests, and to help them achieve greater success. We provide the resources and services that CPAs need to excel in their profession. Since 1901, the MACPA has been a national leader in the CPA profession. We are honored that the Baltimore Business Journal and Washington Business Journal have named the MACPA among the largest networking organizations in Baltimore and Washington, D.C., for each of the past five years. For details, visit www.MACPA.org. Follow the MACPA on Twitter at www.Twitter.com/MACPA. STRATEGIC LEARNING POWERED BY MACPA & BLI
  26. 26. The Business Learning Institute | 25 © 2017 Maryland Association of CPAs, Inc. All rights reserved. Published 2017 Printed in the United States of America Maryland Association of CPAs / Business Learning Institute 901 Dulaney Valley Road, Suite 800 Towson, Md. 21204 MACPA.org blionline.org THE FUTURE OF WORK STARTS WITH CULTURE A conversation about flexibility and remote work ... and the cultures that support them STRATEGIC LEARNING POWERED BY

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