What is UX and how can it help your organisation?

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An overview of User Experience techniques. No longer just web usability testing, there's a new much more human movement in UX. This presentation outlines the key components, with examples: ethnography, and human-centred design.

Published in: Design

What is UX and how can it help your organisation?

  1. 1. AND HOW CAN IT HELP YOUR ORGANISATION? WHAT IS UX
  2. 2. INTRODUCTION: A UX PRIMER
  3. 3. In recent years the User Experience in Libraries movement (UX) has spread from the US and Scandinavia to the UK
  4. 4. Traditionally ‘UX’ has referred largely to web usability testing; but there is a very physical, human dimension to it which the library movement has focused on
  5. 5. UX has become an IBRARIANSHI PUMBRELLA term to cover a suite of techniques that can be divided roughly into two parts: ethnography and design
  6. 6. SIMPLY PUT Ethnographic techniques and observation lead to a deeper and more complex understanding of user needs and behaviour than traditional data gather methods normally allow. (Examples follow)
  7. 7. Simply put, HUMAN CENTRED D E S I G N prioritises the end user, their needs, and their behaviour, at every stage of the design process, with an aim to making several small changes to improve the user experience…
  8. 8. UX is not
  9. 9. UX is not
  10. 10. Libraries are using UX to make an IMPACT on their users’ day to day lives
  11. 11. It’s not that quantitative user data isn’t useful; it’s that qualitative user data can be incredibly rich, and can help supplement what we already have. But how?
  12. 12. PART ONE: ETHNOGRAPHY
  13. 13. 6 KEY ETHNOGRAPHIC TECHNIQUES Observation / Behavioural Mapping Unstructured and Semi-Structured Interviews Cognitive Mapping Touchstone Tours Love Letters / Breakup Letters Cultural Probes
  14. 14. 1. Observation / Behavioural Mapping Note your users as they move through and interact with the library space.
  15. 15. 1. Observation / Behavioural Mapping Note your users as they move through and interact with the library space. What are their paths? What do they see? What do they use? What do they ignore?
  16. 16. 1. Observation / Behavioural Mapping
  17. 17. 2. Unstructured / Semi-Structured Interviews Interview your subject about their working LIFE, not just the library. Ask open questions, based on what they’re saying rather than based on a pre-prepared list. For example ask not ‘what e-resources do you use?’ but ‘what’s your process when you’re set an assignment?’
  18. 18. 3. Cognitive Maps A brilliant jumping off point for the interview is the Cognitive Map. Ask your subject to draw a map from memory – of the library, or of their research process, or of completing an assignment. They have 6 minutes to do this, changing colour of pen every 2 minutes.
  19. 19. 3. Cognitive Maps Note what they put down first, what’s a last minute addition, what they leave out entirely. You can code this later. Then to introduce the unstructured or semi-structured interview, ask them to talk you through their map. Use what they tell you to inform your questions.
  20. 20. 3. Cognitive Maps
  21. 21. 3. Cognitive Maps
  22. 22. 3. Cognitive Maps
  23. 23. 4. Touchstone Tours Rather than showing your users around, let them take YOU on a tour of the library (and record what they say). Does their understanding of processes, systems and the space match your expectations?
  24. 24. 5. Love Letters / Break-up Letters Ask your users to write a letter to a library service (NOT a librarian!) – either professing their love for, or breaking up with, that service. This seems very gimmicky and won’t work with everyone, but when it does work it really allows you to understand the emotion engendered by the user experiences
  25. 25. 6. Cultural Probes Give your users the tools they need to take ethnography home with them – diary studies, a voice recorder, the chance to take pictures… Encourage them to record feelings, events and interactions.
  26. 26. These methods for feedback gathering tend to reveal very in- depth and varied views, feelings and experiences
  27. 27. The key is not to get stuck on the ethnography phase – the next step is to design changes to your service based on what you’ve learned.
  28. 28. PART TWO: DESIGN
  29. 29. The aim is to tweak the service to make the user experience better. This may mean a small number of large changes – you never know what the data will tell you – but most often this will mean a large number of small changes that positively influence the user day to day
  30. 30. The Design Thinking process first defines the problem and then implements the solutions, always with the needs of the user demographic at the core of concept development. This process focuses on needfinding, understanding, creating, thinking, and doing. At the core of this process is a bias towards action and creation: by creating and testing something, you can continue to learn and improve upon your initial ideas. “ Stanford Design School
  31. 31. (In other words: it’s iterative. Rather than saving up your design tweaks for one huge change, go for a rapid- prototyping model…)
  32. 32. Make changes early and often, monitor your users’ responses, and don’t be afraid to fail. Just make sure you record and learn from failure
  33. 33. Perhaps it’s better to make something self- righting than to aim for perfection. Can your users find their own way out of difficulties?
  34. 34. Use design techniques to help structure your thinking Examples courtesy of Modern Human
  35. 35. So there’s a whistle-stop tour of UX, ethnography and design. Try it out at your library and see what you learn.
  36. 36. GOOD LUCK! So there’s a whistle-stop tour of UX, ethnography and design. Try it out at your library and see what you learn.
  37. 37. PHOTO CREDITS
  38. 38. PHOTO CREDITS All photos are CC0 (sourced via Pixabay & Pexels) except the Touchstone Tour pic, courtesy of Georgina Cronin, and the Modern Human design cards, taken by me.
  39. 39. READ MORE ABOUT UX
  40. 40. READ MORE ABOUT UX UX at the University of York Library libinnovation.blogspot.co.uk a structured reading list: ned-potter.com chat to me on twitter: @ned_potter
  41. 41. READ MORE ABOUT UX UX at the University of York Library libinnovation.blogspot.co.uk a structured reading list: ned-potter.com chat to me on twitter: @ned_potter THANKS FOR WATCHING!

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