Identica Insight 11 Wearable Technology

1,092 views

Published on

The ‘web of things’ or ‘internet of things' simply describes the relationship between human beings and everyday objects using the internet.

A world where lighting is controlled by the genre of music being played and our fridges notifying us that we need more juice to replace the vitamins lost on the cycle commute is a very real one. The ‘web of things’ is happening.

An era of devices that intertwine with our clothing and bodies (wearable technology) is upon us.

If you are to cast your minds back to 2010 and the release of the iPad and recall the cries of ‘Why? Why would we need such a product? How does this help me in life?’

And look at us now, eagerly awaiting the next iteration and it’s accompanying accessories.

The same thing will inevitably happen when the impending wearable technologies crash over us. Google Glass, Samsung and Apple’s smart watches will change the way we consume products, socialise and work.

This week’s Identica Insight delves under the skin of the wearable tech world.

Published in: Design, Technology, Business
0 Comments
5 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

No Downloads
Views
Total views
1,092
On SlideShare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
1
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
58
Comments
0
Likes
5
Embeds 0
No embeds

No notes for slide

Identica Insight 11 Wearable Technology

  1. 1. IDENTICA INSIGHT WEARABLE TECHNOLOGY Issue 11
  2. 2. © Copyright Identica Limited 2013 2Issue 11 WEARABLE TECHNOLOGY WEB OF THINGS The ‘web of things’ or ‘internet of things’ simply describes the relationship between human beings and everyday objects using the internet. A world where lighting is controlled by the genre of music being played and our fridges notifying us that we need more juice to replace the vitamins lost on the cycle commute is a very real one. The ‘web of things’ is happening. An era of devices that intertwine with our clothing and bodies (wearable technology) is upon us. If you are to cast your minds back to 2010 and the release of the iPad and recall the cries of ‘Why? Why would we need such a product? How does this help me in life?’ And look at us now, eagerly awaiting the next iteration and it’s accompanying accessories. The same thing will inevitably happen when the impending wearable technologies crash over us. Google Glass, Samsung and Apple’s smart watches will change the way we consume products, socialise and work. This week’s Identica Insight delves under the skin of the wearable tech world. In 2003, there were 500 million devices connected to the internet. 500M Cisco predict that by 2015 there will be 25 billion devices connected to the internet and 50 billion by 2020. 25BN
  3. 3. © Copyright Identica Limited 2013 3Issue 11 CURRENT LANDSCAPE It’s true that society, and especially younger demographics are intrinsically tied to their smartphones. To the point that you could argue that those smartphones are wearable technologies themselves. Currently the wearable consumer tech market has a focus upon fitness and well-being products. There are countless fitness wristbands which are accompanied by apps that track sleep, steps and heart-rate to give consumers an understanding and analysis of their daily activity. These technologies are designed to quantify previously unknowns and motivate users to lead healthier lives. These products are increasingly designed so users have to reach daily targets, in turn encouraging activity. A game if you like. The first smartwatch, Pebble, began it’s life on crowd-sourced website, kickstarter.com where it raised over $10million to start production. The Pebble pairs with both Android and iPhone and allows users to read text messages and emails, control music, track fitness activity, view incoming calls and display weather forecasts. WEARABLE TECHNOLOGY of wearable technologies are currently attributed to sport and activity. 61% 1 2 1. Jawbone Up costs £99 and syncs with many other fitness and nutritional apps. 2. Pebble smartwatch costs $150 and due to its e-reader display has a battery life of 7 days.
  4. 4. © Copyright Identica Limited 2013 4Issue 11 IMMINENT RELEASES WEARABLE TECHNOLOGY Wearable technology can both be an input and output for the ‘internet of things’. Data can be collated from devices to inform the larger network but also filtered back once analysed to further inform. Google Glass is very shortly about to arrive in the consumer marketplace and when it does it will transform the way we access data. Of course the first iterations will be slightly bumpy but accessing maps, location information, people’s names and profiles, weather, traffic, music, media directly in front of you, whenever you want it, will be revolutionary. Of course this will also change the way we purchase products and be exposed to marketing messages. Image recognition inside retail stores to find more about products while being exposed to advertising of products and services while in the vicinity of certain environments will lead to a completely new media platform. Pebble have kickstarted the smartwatch race but now it’s the turn of the tech market leaders to create increasingly seamless products. 1. Google Glass cost ‘early adopters’ £985 but when released in Q4 2013 that price will decrease. 2. Samsung have announced the Galaxy Gear - a smartwatch that allows users to take photographs and answer incoming calls while being synced to a Samsung device. It will cost £250 and wil be shipped in September. 3. Memoto is a camera that clips onto clothing and captures images every 30 seconds. Those images are then compiled daily into a daily visual blog. £200. 1 2 3
  5. 5. © Copyright Identica Limited 2013 5Issue 11 PIRACY & PRIVACY WEARABLE TECHNOLOGY Even before its launch, many people, including US Congress have raised concerns surrounding the privacy control while using the Google Glass or any eye-wear technology. Google claim that privacy and the protection of identities is paramount but there are countless situations in which personal privacy may be compromised by Glass. Nobody could stop somebody recording a pin-code transaction. In Seattle, the 5 Point Cafe has just banned the use of Google Glass. They simply don’t want their clientele on film without their knowledge. People are also concerned about non-natural data in their line of vision inadvertently disrupting cognitive capacity. Social situation may also be compromised. Many believe wearable technology may be similar to the baseball hat. In certain situations, a hat doesn’t even register but at a wedding or at church it certainly does. We believe wearable tech will have similar socially acceptable parameters. Google haven’t put face recognition into their glass product but 3rd party developers have already placed it into the hardware while it has been out in development.
  6. 6. © Copyright Identica Limited 2013 6Issue 11 A barrier to purchase for all wearable devices will be their aesthetic short fallings. All garments and accessories that we wear are extensions of our personalities. Glasses however, are far more personable and identifiable than a watch for example. Brands that launch wearable devices need to be far more fashion conscious. Google are in talks currently with the trendy US eye wear manufacturer, Warby Parker. This collaboration could see Google’s technology marry perfectly with attractive design. There is only a small group of society that will be happy to wear the product as it currently stands. If the technology could be applied in different frame forms, we could see the product sell quicker than Google imagined. All wearable tech manufacturers need to understand that it isn’t their technology that won’t be embraced by the mainstream, it’s their form. Expect to see far more tech and fashion collaborations. FUNCTION MEETS FASHION WEARABLE TECHNOLOGY EVEN IN SAN FRANSISCO, A GUY WEARING GOOGLE GLASS LOOKS LIKE A FOOL “ “
  7. 7. © Copyright Identica Limited 2013 7Issue 11 INNOVATIONS WEARABLE TECHNOLOGY Graphene is a one atom thick layer of graphitic carbon - yet it is stronger than diamond, transparent, lightweight and has incredible conducting properties. Samsung have produced phone prototypes using the material but there are rumours surrounding Apple’s iWatch featuring graphene that have the ability to wrap around the users wrist. Graphene opens up a whole world of possibilities for wearable technologies due to its flexibility. There are huge teams of people from the world’s leading labs trailing new developments in wearable tech to gain a market advantage. A team of engineers from MIT have created the Sesame Ring. The 3D printed ring features an RFID tag that allows users to store passcodes; simply a wearable Oyster card. Students in Singapore have already been using the rings to move around their campus and MIT are to follow shortly. Japanese company Neurowear have created a range of fashion items that operate using brainwaves, including a pair of moveable cat ears. The ears are in an upward position when the user is concentrating and down when the user is relaxed with various movements in between.
  8. 8. © Copyright Identica Limited 2013 8Issue 11 Scientists at the University of California have engineered e-skin that responds to touch and even pressure. The flexible interactive skin has been created to give feeling to those who use prosthetic limbs. The skin is made from synthetic rubber and plastic which is thinner than a piece of paper. The technology is currently being combined with Biostamps. Biostamps use high- performance silicon, can stretch up to 200 per cent and can monitor temperature, hydration and strain, among other medical statistics. The creators say that the e-skin is being developed in a way which will eventually see the silicon used as smart watches and even quick finger payment. Equally as astonishing, researchers at the National Taiwan University have created a ‘wearable oral sensory system’. The system places a mouth sensor inside an artificial tooth and monitors if users are eating, drinking or smoking too much. The advancement is a further step towards healthcare and dietary tracking. INNOVATIONS WEARABLE TECHNOLOGY 1 2 1. During E-skin’s tests the technology was applied for a 24-hour period and was flexible enough to be comfortable. 2. ‘Smart Tooth’ creators are to design a new Bluetooth- enabled prototype that will be small enough to fit inside a tooth cavity and feature inductive battery recharging.
  9. 9. © Copyright Identica Limited 2013 9Issue 11 There seems to be a fair chunk of cynicism surrounding ‘intrusive’ wearable devices. There was a period in history when accessing the time was left to clock-towers and sundials. A ground-breaking innovation was to create small clock wristbands which gave everybody access to the time. In the future, devices will make intuitive decisions based upon knowledge and input from ourselves. They will communicate around us and through us to enhance and simplify our lives. Intelligent networks will mine our data to enhance our workday and social experiences. As this data collection becomes more sweeping and sophisticated, the future could see it incorporated with our medical care. Your doctor will be able to make better recommendations. Eventually, insurance companies will give customers who use a wearable device lower rates - as long as they share that data. One thing is for sure for the initial adoption of wearable tech, their use must be physically effortless as well as intuitive. WHAT DOES THIS MEAN? WEARABLE TECHNOLOGY EVERYTHING THAT IS IN THE WORLD WHEN YOU ARE BORN IS JUST NORMAL. “ Douglas Adams, Writer “
  10. 10. © Copyright Identica Limited 2013 THANK YOU FOR YOUR TIME For further information please contact: LEAH.WILLIAMS@IDENTICA.COM +44 (0) 20 3451 9717

×