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kelly Global workforce index® 
Career 
Development
INTEREST IN 
ACQUIRING 
NEW SKILLS 
51% APAC 
62% GLOBAL 
67% EMEA 
VS 
INTEREST IN 
ADVANCING TO 
A HIGHER LEVEL 
49% APA...
contents 
4 Introduction 
5 Increasing employee 
sentiment 
10 Balancing skills with 
advancement 
15 Engaging employees i...
Introduction 
Employee attraction, retention and 
management are some of the key 
functions of CEOs and managers. 
Yet get...
Increasing employee 
sentiment 
The latest KGWI survey shows that employers are continuing to confront a 
challenging work...
Employee 
Commitment 
Less than a third (31%) of 
respondents say they are “totally 
committed” to their current employers...
Employee 
Loyalty 
It is a similar picture with regard to 
the question of employees’ loyalty 
to their employers. Globall...
Intention to 
Switch Jobs 
Globally, 61% of workers say they 
intend to look for a job with 
another organization within t...
Intention to 
Switch Jobs 
Across the EMEA and APAC 
regions, the intention to switch 
jobs is highest in Denmark, Italy, ...
Balancing skills with advancement 
The task of attracting, nurturing and retaining quality staff is common among 
all empl...
Immediate 
Career Goals 
When considering what is best for 
their career development, the 
majority of employees say they ...
Immediate 
Career Goals 
Among the main generations 
in the workforce, there is 
widespread recognition that skills 
devel...
Willingness 
to trade pay 
for skills 
Not only are skills of critical 
importance to employees, but 
there is even a will...
Immediate 
Careeer Goals 
One of the more interesting 
findings of the survey is that the 
prioritization of skills develo...
Engaging employees 
in career discussions 
A key element of talent development is ensuring that employees are aware of wha...
Career 
Development 
Discussions 
Career discussions should be 
an integral and routine part 
of sound career management, ...
Career 
Development 
Discussions 
The likelihood of an employee 
engaging in a career 
development discussion with their 
...
Career 
Development 
Discussions 
There is wide disparity in the 
incidence of career development 
discussion across the r...
Career 
Development 
Discussions 
There is a significant variation among 
professionals in the extent to which 
they have ...
Career 
Development 
Discussions and 
New Skills 
The intention behind any career 
development discussion is primarily 
to...
Career 
Development 
Discussions and 
New Skills 
Career development discussions 
seem to produce more 
beneficial skills ...
Career 
Development 
Discussions and 
New Skills 
Across professional occupations 
there is a marked variation 
in the ext...
Career 
Development 
Discussions and 
Advancement 
There is also some cynicism 
about the value of career 
development dis...
Career 
Development 
Discussions and 
Advancement 
Career development discussions 
appear to have the greatest 
value amon...
Employees’ views on 
their career prospects 
Some of the earlier survey findings in relation to employee 
commitment and l...
Opportunities to 
Advance/Grow 
with Current 
Employer 
Only approximately a third of 
employees (35%) believe 
that they ...
To what degree do you agree or disagree that you have opportunities to grow/advance your career 
with your current employe...
Oil/Gas Business Services Automotive Energy TrHanigshp oTertc/hD: iIsnttreibrnuetito Snervices/SHoifgthw Taerec hD: eMvaen...
career Paths 
with Current 
Employer 
Akey element of career 
advancement in any given 
workplace is the availability of a...
career Paths 
with Current 
Employer 
It is worth understanding the extent 
to which career options diminish 
with age. Ol...
career Paths 
with Current 
Employer 
The most defined career path 
options with existing employers 
are reported by profe...
Resourcing careers 
As part of the career development process, employees utilize 
a range of different resources to fulfil...
Resources 
used in Career 
Advancement 
The most commonly used career 
development resource is employer-provided 
training...
Resources 
used in Career 
Advancement 
Generationally, significantly more 
Gen Y workers (48%) helped 
themselves to empl...
Resources 
used in Career 
Advancement 
Among professional occupations, 
there are some important 
choices being made betw...
Satisfaction 
with Career 
Development 
Resources 
It is particularly troubling that 
many employees feel only 
marginally...
Satisfaction 
with Career 
Development 
Resources 
There is a marked decline with 
age in employee perceptions of 
quality...
Satisfaction 
with Career 
Development 
Resources 
Across industry, the Oil/Gas sector 
stands out with a relatively 
high...
Conclusion 
Making career development a ‘win-win’ 
Ageneration of more empowered 
employees is looking to take 
charge of ...
About the kelly global workforce index 
The Kelly Global Workforce Index (KGWI) is an annual global survey revealing opini...
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Career Development in Europe and Asia

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Latest Trends about Career Development in Europe and Asia

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Career Development in Europe and Asia

  1. 1. kelly Global workforce index® Career Development
  2. 2. INTEREST IN ACQUIRING NEW SKILLS 51% APAC 62% GLOBAL 67% EMEA VS INTEREST IN ADVANCING TO A HIGHER LEVEL 49% APAC 38% GLOBAL 33% EMEA 57% OF EMPLOYEES ARE WILLING TO SACRIFICE HIGHER PAY FOR THE OPPORTUNITY TO ACQUIRE NEW SKILLS 57% AGREE THAT CAREER DEVELOPMENT DISCUSSIONS ARE BENEFICIAL IN TERMS OF THE OPPORTUNITY TO ACQUIRE NEW SKILLS BUT ONLY 38% HAD THESE DISCUSSIONS WITH THEIR EMPLOYER IN THE PAST YEAR ONLY 29% ARE SATISFIED WITH THE CAREER DEVELOPMENT RESOURCES PROVIDED BY THEIR EMPLOYERS Kelly Global Workforce Index® 2 2
  3. 3. contents 4 Introduction 5 Increasing employee sentiment 10 Balancing skills with advancement 15 Engaging employees in career discussions 25 Employees’ views on their career prospects 32 Resourcing careers 39 Conclusion: Making career development a ‘win-win’ The Kelly Global Workforce Index 2014 The Kelly Global Workforce Index® (KGWI) is an annual global survey revealing opinions about work and the workplace. Almost 230,000 people across the Americas; Europe, the Middle East and Africa (EMEA); and Asia-Pacific (APAC) regions responded to the 2014 survey. The topics covered in the 2014 KGWI survey include: • Engaging Active and Passive Job Seekers • Career Development • The Candidate Experience from Hiring to On-boarding • Worker Preferences and Workplace Agility. Workers from a total of 31 countries participated in the survey, responding in 20 different languages. Results span workplace generations, as well as key industries and occupations. This second installment, on the topic of Career Development, looks across the EMEA and APAC regions to learn what workers are thinking about their careers and the skills that underpin them. The report takes an in-depth look at employee career aspirations, including the drivers of career goals and the factors that matter most in keeping employees engaged and productive. It also provides a glimpse into the world of career management, with insights on what the best employers are doing to invest in personnel, and the particular importance that workers attach to career development activities such as training, mentoring and skills development. Kelly Global Workforce Index® 3
  4. 4. Introduction Employee attraction, retention and management are some of the key functions of CEOs and managers. Yet getting the right formula for a smooth and productive workplace is never easy. Humans can be notoriously difficult to understand and manage, let alone forge into well-oiled, high-performing units. The topic of Career Development seeks to unravel some of the big questions that are occupying the minds of employees as they think about the ongoing process of managing life, learning and work. What is it that employees really want from their employers? Where do they want to be in the next five to 10 years? Will the skills they currently have be sufficient to get them to the next rung of their careers? What are the best employers doing to help advance employees’ careers? The responses to these questions reveal much about the workforce, and the way that people are planning and making informed decisions about career choices. Kelly Global Workforce Index® 4
  5. 5. Increasing employee sentiment The latest KGWI survey shows that employers are continuing to confront a challenging workplace, characterized by relatively weak levels of employee engagement and commitment to work. The mood of the labor market remains difficult for many employers, with job creation slow, economic recovery uneven, and a restless sentiment among much of the workforce. As most employers recognize, levels of engagement and loyalty have a direct bearing on such issues as employee attraction, retention, morale and business performance, so they are an important reflection on the health of a workforce. Firms with poor engagement and loyalty need to understand and address these shortcomings. Firms that are able to harness the skills and capabilities of their workforce will be in a better position to weather these conditions. As will become clear in the following pages, there is a desire among employees for skills enhancement, and an opportunity for employers to invest in personnel in a way that will benefit both enterprises and individuals. Kelly Global Workforce Index® 5
  6. 6. Employee Commitment Less than a third (31%) of respondents say they are “totally committed” to their current employers, down slightly on the previous year. Just 26% of workers in EMEA and 29% in APAC reported feeling “totally committed” in 2014. How committed or ‘engaged’ do you feel with your current employer? (% “totally committed,” by region) 40% 30% 20% 10% 0% 2011 2012 2013 2014 EMEA APAC Global Kelly Global Workforce Index® 6
  7. 7. Employee Loyalty It is a similar picture with regard to the question of employees’ loyalty to their employers. Globally, just 29% of employees say that they feel “more loyal” to their employers in 2014 than they did a year ago, a level that has been largely steady since 2011. In EMEA, 22% report feeling more loyal to their employers in 2014, representing a slight improvement over the past year. In APAC, 32% say they feel more loyal, continuing the downward trend that has taken place over the past two years. Compared with a year ago, do you feel more or less loyal to your employer? (% “more loyal,” by region) 40% 30% 20% 10% 0% 2011 2012 2013 2014 EMEA APAC Global Kelly Global Workforce Index® 7
  8. 8. Intention to Switch Jobs Globally, 61% of workers say they intend to look for a job with another organization within the next year, reflecting the steady decline in this measure of employment volatility over recent years. In EMEA, 68% of workers intend to switch jobs, a level that has been largely stable over the past four years. In APAC, 64% say they intend to look for another job within a year, a figure that has increased slightly over the four-year period. The global decline is largely explained by a significant fall in the Americas that outweighs the increase in EMEA and APAC. Do you intend to look for a job with another organization within the next year? (% “yes,” by region) 80% 70% 60% 50% 40% 2011 2012 2013 2014 EMEA APAC Global Kelly Global Workforce Index® 8
  9. 9. Intention to Switch Jobs Across the EMEA and APAC regions, the intention to switch jobs is highest in Denmark, Italy, Portugal, France, Australia, Sweden and India, where more than 70% of workers plan to change jobs. At the other extreme, Russia, Germany, China, Singapore and Switzerland are all below the global average. Denmark Italy Portugal France Australia Sweden India New ZealandNetherlands UK Hungary Indonesia Norway Thailand Poland Malaysia Switzerland Singapore China Germany Russia Global Do you intend to look for a job with another organization within the next year? (% “yes,” by country) EMEA AVERAGE: 68% APAC AVERAGE: 64% GLOBAL AVERAGE: 61% 100% 80% 60% 40% 20% 0% AUSTRALIA CHINA DENMARK FRANCE GERMANY HUNGARY INDIA INDONESIA ITALY MALAYSIA THE NETHERLANDS NEW ZEALAND NORWAY POLAND PORTUGAL RUSSIA SINGAPORE SWEDEN SWITZERLAND THAILAND THE UNITED KINGDOM Denmark Italy Portugal France Australia Sweden India New ZealandNetherlands UK Hungary Indonesia Norway Thailand Poland Malaysia Switzerland Singapore China Germany Russia Kelly Global Workforce Index® 9
  10. 10. Balancing skills with advancement The task of attracting, nurturing and retaining quality staff is common among all employers. Providing opportunities for employee promotion is obviously an important part of this, but it is not as important as some employers might think. There is a firmly held view among many survey respondents that acquiring skills is more important than advancing up the corporate hierarchy. Employees place a premium on skills development, and understand the importance of skills to future job security and career progression. For employers, this suggests that promoting employees is not always a sound retention strategy, particularly if the promotion is not accompanied by measures to ensure that employees have the appropriate skills for the future. It is often easy to overlook the degree of volatility that businesses and employees have endured in the economic upheaval of recent years. In this environment, skills provide people with the knowledge and capacity to perform not only their current jobs, but the adaptability and flexibility to take on the jobs of the future – jobs that may be very different. Skills development needs to be a high priority for firms wanting to improve employee commitment, retention and productivity. Kelly Global Workforce Index® 10
  11. 11. Immediate Career Goals When considering what is best for their career development, the majority of employees say they are more interested in skills development than advancing up the corporate ladder. Globally, 62% are more interested in acquiring new skills than in reaching a higher level in their organization (38%). There is a very strong focus on skills development among employees in EMEA, where 67% see skills acquisition as the priority. It is a somewhat different picture in APAC, where respondents are split more evenly between prioritizing skills (51%) and prioritizing advancement (49%). When considering career advancement opportunities, which statement best describes your immediate career goal? (%, by region) GLOBAL EMEA APAC I am more interested in acquiring new skills I am more interested in advancing to a higher level 62% 38% 67% 33% 51% 49% Kelly Global Workforce Index® 11
  12. 12. Immediate Career Goals Among the main generations in the workforce, there is widespread recognition that skills development is the best option for career advancement, with older workers more likely to embrace that choice. Among Baby Boomers, 69% favor skills acquisition over corporate advancement as the best means of achieving their career goals – more than Gen Y (61%) and Gen X (60%). When considering career advancement opportunities, which statement best describes your immediate career goal? (%, by generation) GEN Y GEN X BABY BOOMERS I am more interested in acquiring new skills I am more interested in advancing to a higher level 61% 39% 60% 40% 69% 31% Kelly Global Workforce Index® 12
  13. 13. Willingness to trade pay for skills Not only are skills of critical importance to employees, but there is even a willingness to sacrifice higher pay and career growth for the opportunity to acquire new skills. The idea of learning new skills at work is worth more than higher pay and/ or career growth or advancement for more than half (57%) of employees. Perhaps sensing that skill development is a “golden ticket” to a better future, APAC employees are far more willing to forego pay and/or advancement (66%) than those in EMEA (57%). How likely would you be to give up higher pay and/or career growth or advancement for opportunity to learn new skills? (% “definitely would” and “would,” by region) 57% EMEA 66% APAC 57% GLOBAL Kelly Global Workforce Index® 13
  14. 14. Immediate Careeer Goals One of the more interesting findings of the survey is that the prioritization of skills development ahead of promotion is not confined to professional and technical employees, who might typically be expected to prioritize skills advancement. In fact, skills development is a slightly higher priority among Non- Professional/Technical employees (64%) compared with Professional/ Technical staff members (61%). When considering career advancement opportunities, which statement best describes your immediate career goal? (%) PROFESSIONAL/TECHNICAL NON-PROFESSIONAL/TECHNICAL I am more interested in acquiring new skills I am more interested in advancing to a higher level 61% 39% 64% 36% Kelly Global Workforce Index® 14
  15. 15. Engaging employees in career discussions A key element of talent development is ensuring that employees are aware of what is being done to manage and develop their skills for the future. Structured career discussions between employers and employees are essential for effective talent management. Career discussions tap into a desire for new capabilities, and are an important avenue for employer–employee engagement. However, often the career interactions that take place do not necessarily meet the needs of employees in terms of new skills development and career growth, suggesting that some firms are misdirecting their efforts in this area. It’s important for employers to recognize the premium that employees place on individual skills development. It’s good for business, but it is also an investment in employees’ futures. Skills and career development go hand in hand. Employees want their managers and leaders to engage with them about their careers. They want direction, assurance and guidance. Career development interactions need to be carefully thought out so that they are structured and targeted, and so that there is a genuine and open exchange about individual career opportunities, challenges and limitations. Kelly Global Workforce Index® 15
  16. 16. Career Development Discussions Career discussions should be an integral and routine part of sound career management, but frequently they do not occur. Globally, 38% of employees say they have had a career development discussion in the past year. Significantly more employees in APAC have had career development discussions in the past year (50%) than those in EMEA (41%). Within the last year, have you had a career development discussion with your employer? (% “yes,” by region) 38% 41% 50% GLOBAL EMEA APAC Kelly Global Workforce Index® 16
  17. 17. Career Development Discussions The likelihood of an employee engaging in a career development discussion with their employer declines with age. Many more Gen Y workers discussed their career development with their employer (42%) compared to 40% of Gen X and 29% of Baby Boomers. Within the last year, have you had a career development discussion with your employer? (% “yes,” by generation) Baby Boomers 29% Gen Y 42% Gen X 40% Kelly Global Workforce Index® 17
  18. 18. Career Development Discussions There is wide disparity in the incidence of career development discussion across the regions. The highest rates are in China (61%), Indonesia (59%), Russia (57%), Malaysia (57%), Thailand (57%) and Germany (56%). The lowest are in Hungary (18%), Portugal (31%), and Australia and Sweden (both 33%). China Indonesia Russia Malaysia Thailand Germany India Switzerland France Singapore Netherlands Norway Poland Denmark Italy UK New Zealand Sweden Australia Portugal Hungary Global Within the last year, have you had a career development discussion with your employer? (% “yes,” by country) APAC AVERAGE: 50% EMEA AVERAGE: 41% GLOBAL AVERAGE: 38% 70% 60% 50% 40% 30% 20% 10% 0% AUSTRALIA CHINA DENMARK FRANCE GERMANY HUNGARY INDIA INDONESIA ITALY MALAYSIA THE NETHERLANDS NEW ZEALAND NORWAY POLAND PORTUGAL RUSSIA SINGAPORE SWEDEN SWITZERLAND THAILAND THE UNITED KINGDOM China Indonesia Russia Malaysia Thailand Germany India Switzerland France Singapore Netherlands Norway Poland Denmark Italy UK New Zealand Sweden Australia Portugal Hungary Kelly Global Workforce Index® 18
  19. 19. Career Development Discussions There is a significant variation among professionals in the extent to which they have had career development conversations with their employers. More than half of those in Marketing (54%) and Sales (51%) have had such discussions in the past year, but only 21% of those in Education, 34% of those in Math and 38% of those in Healthcare. Within the last year, have you had a career development discussion with your employer? (% “yes,” by occupation) MARKETING SALES IT ENGINEERING SCIENCE SECURITY CLEARANCE LAW HEALTHCARE MATH EDUCATION 0% 10% 20% 30% 40% 50% 60% Kelly Global Workforce Index® 19
  20. 20. Career Development Discussions and New Skills The intention behind any career development discussion is primarily to assist employees to acquire the skills and capabilities that are appropriate for the next stage of their careers. But not all career development discussions produce these outcomes. Globally, 57% of workers felt that the career development discussions they had helped them in terms of new skills. Significantly more workers in APAC believe these conversations led to the opportunity to acquire new skills (61%) compared to those in EMEA (52%). Among those who had a career development discussion in the last year, to what degree do you agree or disagree that the career development discussion was beneficial in terms of providing you with the opportunity to acquire new skills? (% “strongly agree” and “agree,” by region) 52% EMEA 61% APAC 57% GLOBAL Kelly Global Workforce Index® 20
  21. 21. Career Development Discussions and New Skills Career development discussions seem to produce more beneficial skills development outcomes for younger employees. Among those who had career development discussions in the past year, 61% of Gen Y workers found these discussions beneficial in acquiring new skills. In contrast, fewer Gen X workers found these discussions beneficial to their skills development (54%), and this fell to 49% among Baby Boomers. Among those who had a career development discussion in the last year, to what degree do you agree or disagree that the career development discussion was beneficial in terms of providing you with the opportunity to acquire new skills? (% “strongly agree” and “agree,” by generation) Gen Y 61% Gen X 54% Baby Boomers 49% Kelly Global Workforce Index® 21
  22. 22. Career Development Discussions and New Skills Across professional occupations there is a marked variation in the extent to which career development discussions result in new skills development. Those in Math (71%) and Education (61%) appear to derive the greatest benefit. More professionals in Engineering and IT say these discussions were beneficial in acquiring new skills (58% each), compared to those in Finance/Accounting (54%), Science (50%) and Law (49%). Among those who had a career development discussion in the last year, to what degree do you agree or disagree that the career development discussion was beneficial in terms of providing you with the opportunity to acquire new skills? (% “strongly agree” and “agree,” by occupation) MATH EDUCATION ENGINEERING IT SALES MARKETING SECURITY CLEARANCE HEALTHCARE FINANCE/ACCOUNTING SCIENCE LAW 30% 40% 50% 60% 70% 80% Kelly Global Workforce Index® 22
  23. 23. Career Development Discussions and Advancement There is also some cynicism about the value of career development discussions in terms of career advancement. Among the 38% of workers globally who had career development discussions with their employers, almost half (48%) agreed that they were beneficial in terms of future advancement opportunities. But the results vary considerably across the regions. There were significantly more workers in APAC who found that these discussions helped them in future advancement opportunities (57%), compared to 42% in EMEA. Among those who had a career development discussion in the last year, to what degree do you agree or disagree that the career development discussion was beneficial to you in terms of potential/future advancement opportunities? (% “strongly agree” and “agree,” by region) 42% EMEA 57% APAC 48% GLOBAL Kelly Global Workforce Index® 23
  24. 24. Career Development Discussions and Advancement Career development discussions appear to have the greatest value among younger workers. Among the 38% who had career development discussions in the past year, 52% of Gen Y workers agreed that these conversations had been beneficial in terms of potential or future advancement opportunities. Fewer Gen X (46%) reported the same benefits, and only 39% of Baby Boomers felt these discussions had been beneficial. Among those who had a career development discussion in the last year, to what degree do you agree or disagree that the career development discussion was beneficial to you in terms of potential/future advancement opportunities? (% “strongly agree” and “agree,” by generation) Gen Y 52% Gen X 46% Baby Boomers 39% Kelly Global Workforce Index® 24
  25. 25. Employees’ views on their career prospects Some of the earlier survey findings in relation to employee commitment and loyalty come into sharper focus when looking at employees’ views about their immediate career prospects. What is clear is that employees attach considerable value to their career prospects and trajectory, since it is their own assurance of job security and prosperity. Employees also look to their employers to help advance their careers, and they will look elsewhere if they see their careers hitting a roadblock. Employers who take active steps to help build their employees’ careers reap the benefits of both a more engaged and committed workforce, as well as a more productive workforce. Kelly Global Workforce Index® 25
  26. 26. Opportunities to Advance/Grow with Current Employer Only approximately a third of employees (35%) believe that they will have the opportunity to advance their careers with their current employers. Significantly more workers in APAC (40%) are confident about their advancement opportunities than those in EMEA, at just 32%. To what degree do you agree or disagree that you have opportunities to grow/advance your career with your current employer? (% “strongly agree” and “agree,” by region) 32% EMEA 40% APAC 35% GLOBAL Kelly Global Workforce Index® 26
  27. 27. To what degree do you agree or disagree that you have opportunities to grow/advance your career with your current employer? (% “strongly agree” and “agree,” by generation) Opportunities to Advance/Grow with Current Employer A s employees age, they progressively lose confidence in their advancement opportunities. While 39% of Gen Y are confident about growing their careers with their current employer, this falls to 36% among Gen X and just 28% among Baby Boomers. Gen Y 39% Gen X 36% Baby Boomers 28% Kelly Global Workforce Index® 27
  28. 28. Oil/Gas Business Services Automotive Energy TrHanigshp oTertc/hD: iIsnttreibrnuetito Snervices/SHoifgthw Taerec hD: eMvaenloupfmacetuFnortiondg & Beverage GovernmFineannt cial Services & InsurancReetail Hospitality/TraveCl/hLemisuicrael/PetrochemciaElducation Life Sciences Utilities To what degree do you agree or disagree that you have opportunities to grow/advance your career with your current employer? (% “strongly agree” and “agree,” by industry) Opportunities to Advance/Grow with Current Employer By industry sector, the best prospects for career advancement with existing employers are in Oil/Gas (43%), Business Services (42%), Automotive and Energy (both 40%). The least favorable prospects are in Utilities (29%) and Life Sciences (33%). 45% 40% 35% 30% 25% 20% UTILITIES LIFE SCIENCES EDUCATION CHEMICAL/PETROCHEMCIAL HOSPITALITY/TRAVEL/LEISURE RETAIL FINANCIAL SERVICES & INSURANCE GOVERNMENT FOOD & BEVERAGE HIGH TECH: MANUFACTURING SOFTWARE DEVELOPMENT HIGH TECH: INTERNET SERVICES/ TRANSPORT/DISTRIBUTION ENERGY AUTOMOTIVE BUSINESS SERVICES OIL/GAS Kelly Global Workforce Index® 28
  29. 29. career Paths with Current Employer Akey element of career advancement in any given workplace is the availability of a defined pathway along which employees can progress, in keeping with their knowledge, skills and experience. Globally, 29% of respondents say that their employers provide a career path that would afford career advancement. Significantly more workers in APAC (37%) say their employers provide clear career path options, compared with just 23% in EMEA. To what degree do you have clear career path options available with your current employer? (% “very clear” and “clear,” by region) 23% EMEA 37% APAC 29% GLOBAL Kelly Global Workforce Index® 29
  30. 30. career Paths with Current Employer It is worth understanding the extent to which career options diminish with age. Older workers clearly believe they have fewer choices than younger workers in choosing between various career options. Almost a third of Gen Y (32%) and more than a quarter of Gen X (29%) say they have clear career path options, compared to less than a quarter (23%) of Baby Boomers. To what degree do you have clear career path options available with your current employer? (% “very clear” and “clear,” by generation) Baby Boomers 23% Gen Y 32% Gen X 29% Kelly Global Workforce Index® 30
  31. 31. career Paths with Current Employer The most defined career path options with existing employers are reported by professionals in Math and Sales (both 33%). At the other end of the scale, there are less clear career paths for those professionals in Science (22%) and Law (26%). To what degree do you have clear career path options available with your current employer? (% “very clear” and “clear,” by occupation) MATH SALES EDUCATION ENGINEERING IT MARKETING SECURITY CLEARANCE FINANCE/ACCOUNTING HEALTHCARE LAW SCIENCE 0% 5% 10% 15% 20% 25% 30% 35% Kelly Global Workforce Index® 31
  32. 32. Resourcing careers As part of the career development process, employees utilize a range of different resources to fulfill their career ambitions, including training, mentoring, coaching and assessments. These resources may be provided by the employer, the employee or both. With a new wave of empowered employees taking greater control over their careers, there is a fresh focus on the effectiveness of these tools and resources. What is perhaps most problematic is that well-intentioned employers are wasting some of the investment in career development resources. Employees identify both the good and the bad in terms of money spent on developing their careers. Also, we see that while employees attach considerable value to those employers who do a good job in nurturing and developing talent, they are also prepared to seek out and pay for their own training or leave for organizations with a reputation for talent development. Kelly Global Workforce Index® 32
  33. 33. Resources used in Career Advancement The most commonly used career development resource is employer-provided training, utilized by 46% globally, but with higher rates in APAC (49%) than in EMEA (40%). The second most used resource was training that is sought out or paid for by the employee, utilized by 32% globally – 36% in EMEA and 32% in APAC. Other commonly used resources are mentoring (27% globally), career tests (25%) and professional career coaching (20%). When preparing for career development/advancement opportunities, which of the following resources have you utilized within the last year to realize your strengths? (% by region, multiple responses allowed) 60% 40% 20% 0% Professional career coaching Training sought out/ Mentoring Career tests paid for myself Employer-provided training EMEA APAC Global Kelly Global Workforce Index® 33
  34. 34. Resources used in Career Advancement Generationally, significantly more Gen Y workers (48%) helped themselves to employer-provided training within the last year to realize career strengths, compared to Gen X (45%) and Baby Boomers (43%). The reliance on self-sought/self-paid training is most prevalent among Gen X (35%) and Baby Boomers (34%) and less among Gen Y (28%). Mentoring is considerably more sought after by Gen Y (31%) than Gen X (26%) and Baby Boomers (23%). When preparing for career development/advancement opportunities, which of the following resources have you utilized within the last year to realize your strengths? (% by generation, multiple responses allowed) 60% 40% 20% 0% Professional career coaching Training sought out/ Mentoring Career tests paid for myself Employer-provided training Gen Y Gen X Baby Boomers Kelly Global Workforce Index® 34
  35. 35. Resources used in Career Advancement Among professional occupations, there are some important choices being made between employer-provided training and self-sought/self-paid training. Healthcare and Sales have the highest rates of employer-provided training (both 49%). Law has the lowest rate of employer-provided training (38%), but one of the highest rates of self-sought/ self-paid training (38%). At just 31%, Science has the lowest rate of self-sought/self-paid training. For employers, this raises the important question of what is the right balance between employer-provided training and self-sought/paid training and, in each case, whether the training provided is meeting the needs of employees and the business. When preparing for career development/advancement opportunities, which of the following resources have you utilized within the last year to realize your strengths? (%, top two resources, by profession) 60% 40% 20% 0% Finance/ Marketing Education Math Law Accounting Security/ Engineering IT Science Clearance Healthcare Sales Employer-provided training Training sought out/ paid for myself Kelly Global Workforce Index® 35
  36. 36. Satisfaction with Career Development Resources It is particularly troubling that many employees feel only marginally satisfied with the career development resources that their employers are making available. Just over a quarter of workers across the globe (29%) are satisfied with their employer-provided career development resources. Significantly more workers in APAC feel satisfied with their employers’ resource offerings (30%), compared to only 21% in EMEA. The satisfaction rates point to a mismatch between employers and employees on this issue and suggest that much of the employer investment is probably being wasted. What is your overall level of satisfaction with the career development resources offered by your current employer? (% “very satisfied” and “satisfied,” by region) 21% 30% EMEA APAC 29% GLOBAL Kelly Global Workforce Index® 36
  37. 37. Satisfaction with Career Development Resources There is a marked decline with age in employee perceptions of quality in regard to employer-provided career development services. Among Gen Y workers, almost a third (31%) are satisfied with the employer-provided services on offer, but this declines to just 26% of Gen X and 24% of Baby Boomers. What is your overall level of satisfaction with the career development resources offered by your current employer? (% “very satisfied” and “satisfied,” by generation) Baby Boomers 24% Gen Y 31% Gen X 26% Kelly Global Workforce Index® 37
  38. 38. Satisfaction with Career Development Resources Across industry, the Oil/Gas sector stands out with a relatively high level of employee satisfaction with the employer-provided career development resources on offer (34%). Automotive, Business Services, Education, Financial Services & Insurance, High Tech: Manufacturing, and High Tech: Internet Services/ Software Development are all above the global average, while Utilities (24%) is well below the global average. Oil/Gas Automotive Business Services EducatFiionnancial Services &H iIgnHhsu itgrehacn htce: ecMha: nInutfearcnteutr iSnegrvices/SCofhtewmaricea dl/ePveetlroopcmheemntical Energy Food & Beverage Life Sciences GovernmenTtransport/distrihboustpioitnality/travel/leisure retail utilities What is your overall level of satisfaction with the career development resources offered by your current employer? (% “very satisfied” and “satisfied,” by industry) 36% 34% 32% 30% 28% 26% 24% 22% 20% UTILITIES RETAIL HOSPITALITY/TRAVEL/LEISURE TRANSPORT/DISTRIBUTION GOVERNMENT LIFE SCIENCES FOOD & BEVERAGE ENERGY CHEMICAL/PETROCHEMICAL SOFTWARE DEVELOPMENT HIGH TECH: INTERNET SERVICES/ HIGH TECH: MANUFACTURING FINANCIAL SERVICES & INSURANCE EDUCATION BUSINESS SERVICES AUTOMOTIVE OIL/GAS Kelly Global Workforce Index® 38
  39. 39. Conclusion Making career development a ‘win-win’ Ageneration of more empowered employees is looking to take charge of their careers and, with that, utilize a full suite of tools and resources that will help them to prosper. Skills formation and development is more important than ever. The economic recession and the slow recovery of labor markets have reminded employees of the need for optimum capability and adaptability. Many of the lessons that have emerged from this study are simple yet often overlooked. Promotion at the expense of skills may meet a short-term goal, but employees typically value deepening long-term skills. Career discussions with employees meet a real need. They help forge career direction and structure, and they are an important avenue for employer–employee engagement. Empowered and autonomous workers build their strengths primarily through employer-provided training. They also seek out and pay for their own training to continue to build their toolkit so they are well positioned for the future. Employers who take the initiative of helping employees to better understand their career paths need to ensure that the resources they deploy are properly suited to those they intend to help. There are a few steps employers can take: • Fully evaluate existing career development initiatives to test their suitability to employees’ needs and their fit with the organization’s human capital needs. • Approach career development in a structured way as part of regular performance reviews. • Consider a career ‘future-proofing’ exercise to encourage employees to consider how their industry and their jobs will evolve, and the skills, qualifications and training that will be required. • Develop a knowledge-capture program to harness the skills and expertise of gifted, expert and longstanding employees so that this intellectual property can be retained in the firm and passed on to newer and less experienced staff. Kelly Global Workforce Index® 39
  40. 40. About the kelly global workforce index The Kelly Global Workforce Index (KGWI) is an annual global survey revealing opinions about work and the workplace. Approximately 230,000 people across the Americas, EMEA and APAC regions responded to the survey. The survey was conducted online by RDA Group on behalf of Kelly Services. EXIT About Kelly Services® Kelly Services, Inc. (NASDAQ: KELYA, KELYB) is a leader in providing workforce solutions. Kelly® offers a comprehensive array of outsourcing and consulting services as well as world-class staffing on a temporary, temporary-to-hire and direct-hire basis. Serving clients around the globe, Kelly provided employment to approximately 540,000 employees in 2013. Revenue in 2013 was $5.4 billion. Visit kellyservices.com and connect with us on Facebook, LinkedIn and Twitter. Download The Talent Project, a free iPad® app by Kelly Services. An Equal Opportunity Employer. © 2014 Kelly Services kellyservices.com Kelly Global Workforce Index™ 40

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