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We Can and We Should: libraries' role in open education

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We can and we should: the libraries' role in open education
Libraries around the country, and the world, are increasingly devoting time and resources to open education. But why? In what way are libraries part of this movement and how does it serve our missions and services? This presentation will describe the value that libraries’ engagement in this space can offer to our institutions, our students, and our profession; and, to outline possible ways forward for libraries that are interested in committing their limited resources to this transformative effort.

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We Can and We Should: libraries' role in open education

  1. 1. Sarah Faye Cohen Managing Director / Open Textbook Network open.umn.edu The libraries' role in open education (the holiday version!) We can and we should
  2. 2. This is about a journey.
  3. 3. Course Reserves
  4. 4. Course Reserves • Students looking for textbooks • Faculty meeting that need • The library cultivating relationships with faculty and students through reserves • Long lines • Too few copies • Too many copies for the library’s space • Desk ”traffic patterns”
  5. 5. Operationally, we “fixed” the problem. Policies Processes Communications Facilities Feedback
  6. 6. “There’s an open education conference in Vancouver, BC. You should go.”
  7. 7. “There’s an open education conference in Vancouver, BC. You should go.”
  8. 8. “There’s an open education conference in Vancouver, BC. You should go.”
  9. 9. Defining Open Educational Resources Hewlett Foundation Definition: “OER are teaching, learning, and research resources that reside in the public domain or are released under an intellectual property license that permits their free use and repurposing by others”
  10. 10. That’s where I met Dave Ernst.
  11. 11. $2,000 $3,000 $4,000 $5,000 $6,000 $7,000 $8,000 $9,000 1988 1990 1992 1994 1996 1998 2000 2002 2004 2006 2008 2010 2012 US Higher Education Funding - $/FTE State Funding Tuition Revenue http://www.sheeo.org
  12. 12. $400 $500 $600 $700 $800 $900 $1,000 $1,100 $1,200 $1,300 $1,400 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 2015 $Billions US Debt Consumer Revolving Credit Student Loan Debt Federal Reserve http://www.federalreserve.gov/releases/g19/Current/
  13. 13. 0% 100% 200% 300% 400% 500% 600% 700% 1980 1981 1982 1983 1984 1985 1986 1987 1988 1989 1990 1991 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 %Increase Increase in Textbook Prices Textbooks CPI Bureau of Labor Statistics http://www.bls.gov/cpi/
  14. 14. Open Content OER
  15. 15. How does open education fit into the libraries’ landscape?
  16. 16. The cost barrier kept 2.4 million low and moderate-income college-qualified high school graduates from completing college in the previous decade. The Advisory Committee on Student Financial Assistance http://files.eric.ed.gov/fulltext/ED529499.pdf
  17. 17. A Lens Into Libraries
  18. 18. Open is “disruptive” to libraries
  19. 19. open = permissions  free
  20. 20. open = permissions  free
  21. 21. open = permissions  free copy mix share keep edit use
  22. 22. open = permissions  free The 5 Rs: revise retain remix reuse redistribute
  23. 23. open = permissions  free
  24. 24. Library resources are not “open”, only “available” within your institution.
  25. 25. -25% 25% 75% 125% 175% 225% 275% 325% 375% 425% 1986 1989 1992 1995 1998 2001 2004 2007 2010 %ChangeSince1986 Source: ARL Statistics 2010-11 Association of Research Libraries, Washington, D.C. *Includes electronic resources from 1999-2000 onward. Graph 2 Monograph and Serial Costs in ARL Libraries, 1986-2011* Serial Expenditures (+402%) Monograph Expenditures (+71%) Monographs Purchased (10%) www.sparcopen.org
  26. 26. Libraries risk their “stamp of approval” • OER and authority, reliability, sustainability. • Information Literacy & Instruction • Research materials • Relationships • Metrics
  27. 27. How does open fit into what libraries already do?
  28. 28. How does open fit into what libraries already do? • Scholarly Communication • Institutional Repositories • Information Literacy Curriculum • Instruction and Outreach • Access Services • Interlibrary Loan • Reserves • Collection Development and Collections Management • Electronic Resources Management • Cataloging, Indexing, Metadata
  29. 29. Leverage our expertise • Organizing information and making it accessible
  30. 30. Leverage our expertise • Organizing information and making it accessible • Leverage libraries’ work thus far
  31. 31. Leverage our expertise • Organizing information and making it accessible • Leverage libraries’ work thus far • A trusted resource and bridge to faculty
  32. 32. Collaborate deeply with faculty. • Actualize librarians’ deep interest in creative and innovative pedagogy. • Realize the potential of the 5Rs. • Use OERs in the flipped classrooms, as well as inquiry based learning, problem based learning, active learning. • Stimulate tangible partnerships with Centers for Teaching and Learning, Instructional Designers, Distance Education, and more.
  33. 33. Leverage our expertise • Organizing information and making it accessible • Leverage libraries’ work thus far • A trusted resource and bridge to faculty • Surface information habits of users, especially students
  34. 34. Integrate open into current and new instruction • ACRL Framework: Threshold Concepts • Open’s potential to address many of the TCs: • Format as process • Authority as Constructed and Contextual • Information as commodity • Assessment opportunities: • Creation and modification with students using open content would allow libraries to provide direct assessment /artifacts of student learning and achievement in these TCs.
  35. 35. Build connections to: • ACRL's strategic direction for libraries: • expressing the value of libraries, student learning, and active participation in the research and scholarly environment. • Intersections in Scholarly Communication and Information Literacy • Other open initiatives (OA, open data, knowledge commons, etc).
  36. 36. There is still much to be done. • Accessibility • Discovery • Integration • Tools for editing, authoring, metadata • Metrics • Preservation • Outreach • What else?
  37. 37. Open Textbook Network The Open Textbook Network is an alliance of colleges and universities committed to access, affordability, and student academic success through the use of open textbooks.
  38. 38. Open Content OER Open Textbooks
  39. 39. Why Textbooks? • Hits a major pain point – textbook costs • Faculty understand textbooks • Faculty know how to adopt textbooks • Faculty effort (vs. alternatives) is kept at a minimum • Textbooks can provide content for a complete (or nearly complete) course
  40. 40. What are your next steps?
  41. 41. We need YOU (and your friends) • You are leaders on your campus. • You work with and support faculty on your campus. • You share resources, options, ideas, and tools with faculty.
  42. 42. -OER: email/meetings/+ -Outreach to champions (especially by liaisons). -Partnership with student government. -Online guides (instructors, students). -OER listserv/learning community. -Webinars/workshops (e.g. using and adapting). -Adopter profiles (articles, videos). -Mini-grants to encourage adoption -What else?
  43. 43. “Open education is about increasing student achievement, inspiring passion among faculty, and building better connections between students and the materials that they use to meet their educational goals.” – Quill West
  44. 44. Thank you! @thesheck @open_textbooks sfcohen@umn.edu

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