Project 02

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Project 02

  1. 1. [September 24] [Project 02] [2009] Andrew Wise [Solid 34745237 Modeling MAE 377 Assignment]
  2. 2. Table of Contents 1 Introduction .......................................................................................................................................... 3 2 Problem Statement ............................................................................................................................... 3 3 Results ................................................................................................................................................... 4 3.1 Part A............................................................................................................................................. 4 3.1.1 Figure 1.................................................................................................................................. 4 3.2 Part B ............................................................................................................................................. 5 3.2.1 Figure 2.................................................................................................................................. 5 3.3 Part C ............................................................................................................................................. 6 3.3.1 Figure 3.................................................................................................................................. 6 3.4 The Pulley ...................................................................................................................................... 7 3.4.1 Figure 4.................................................................................................................................. 7 3.4.2 Figure 5.................................................................................................................................. 8 3.5 The Bolt ......................................................................................................................................... 9 3.5.1 Figure 6.................................................................................................................................. 9 3.6 The Bracket ................................................................................................................................. 10 3.6.1 Figure 7................................................................................................................................ 10 3.7 The Bushing & the Washer ......................................................................................................... 11 3.7.1 Figure 8................................................................................................................................ 11 3.7.2 Figure 9................................................................................................................................ 11 3.8 The Slotted Bolt........................................................................................................................... 12 3.8.1 Figure 10 ............................................................................................................................. 12 3.9 The Base Plate ............................................................................................................................. 13 3.9.1 Figure 11 ............................................................................................................................. 13 3.10 The Assembly .............................................................................................................................. 14 3.10.1 Figure 12 ............................................................................................................................. 14 4 Discussion............................................................................................................................................ 14 2|Page
  3. 3. 5 Conclusion ........................................................................................................................................... 15 6 References .......................................................................................................................................... 15 1 Introduction Solid Modeling Assignment 02 is the next step in the class’s education in Pro Engineer Wildfire 4.0. The task was broken into two parts. The first part essentially had the class take what it had learned from Project 01 and use it to model more sophisticated parts. The second part required the class to do this also but the additional requirement of learning new techniques and features such as 2-D drawings and assembly drawings. 2 Problem Statement Project 02 required the follow drawings from the text be completed: Figure #7 on Page 3-32, the screw from Page 5-22, a spring, and the Assembly Drawing on the cover of the textbook. The assembly drawing requires the class to model each individual component. As an added task, the class is expect to create a two-dimensional drawing from the pulley wheel from the assembly. 3|Page
  4. 4. 3 Results The following is the result of the Project 02. 3.1 Part A Part A was simple. It was done only with one solid protrusion and one cut. Compared to the rest of what would come, Part A was fairly tame. 3.1.1 Figure 1 (a) (b) Figure 1 (a) ProE model of Part A; and (b) the same ProE model of Part A from the back. Note that Part A is in fact symmetrical. Part A can be done in only one cut and one protrusion because it is symmetrical. One only needs to draw two sketches to get a handle on the object. 4|Page
  5. 5. 3.2 Part B Part B is a “threadless” screw. Such detail is at current still out of reach of the class. However, the class did make use of familiar commands such as pattern and revolve cut. 3.2.1 Figure 2 (a) (b) Figure 2(a) is a screw; Figure2(b) shows the cross pattern in the head. 5|Page
  6. 6. 3.3 Part C Part C is a spring. This is a new topic for the class. It requires the use of the helical sweep command. 3.3.1 Figure 3 (a) (b) Figure3(a) is spring; Figure 3(b)is another view of the same spring. 6|Page
  7. 7. 3.4 The Pulley The pulley wheel was the first part completed for the assembly drawing. All in all, it was a good review of what the class had learned from Project 01. There were protrusions, patterns, holes, rounds, and multiple cuts. 3.4.1 Figure 4 (a) (b) Figure 4(a) is the pulley wheel; Figure 4(b) is a side view of the same wheel. Compare this orthographical projection to the one shown in Figure 5. The pulley is the only part of the assembly that had to be drawn in two dimensions as a project requirement. 7|Page
  8. 8. 3.4.2 Figure 5 Figure 5 is a 2-D orthographic projection of the pulley wheel. From this drawing, the part could actually be manufactured. The nice part about this process is that ProE does not make its user draw anything. If a part has already been modeled, the user only needs to reference the model in the new drawing and ProE will do everything except for some dimensions. 8|Page
  9. 9. 3.5 The Bolt The hexagonal bolt was deceptively simple. One could easily draw the hexagon cut with six lines. However, the class learned that the palette feature in the sketch sidebar has many different polygons already program into ProE. 3.5.1 Figure 6 (a) (b) Figure 6(a) is a look at the bolt model from ProE; Figure 6(b) is a different angle. Note the hexagonal head. This bolt is also “threadless.” The class is anxious to learn when threads will appear on an upcoming homework assignment. 9|Page
  10. 10. 3.6 The Bracket The bracket was good review. It required rounds, holes, and protrusions. 3.6.1 Figure 7 (a) (b) Figure 7(a) is a look at the front side of the bracket; Figure7(b) is the rear look. Not the smooth edges at the joint. The hardest part of this piece was the correct dimensions. The books used several sets for this piece. 10 | P a g e
  11. 11. 3.7 The Bushing & the Washer The bushing and the washer are the exact same model on ProE. The only thing different about the two is the dimensions. The bushing is both bigger and thicker than the washer. 3.7.1 Figure 8 (a) (b) Figure 8(a) is a bushing; Figure 8(b) is another look at a bushing; One could model a roll of duct tape similarly. 3.7.2 Figure 9 (a) (b) Figure 9(a) is a view of the washer; Figure 9(b) is another view. Note the similar to the bushing. 11 | P a g e
  12. 12. Both pieces required one sketch with two circles (one inside the other) and an extrusion. The only difference was the dimensioning. 3.8 The Slotted Bolt The slotted blot acts as an axle in the pulley assembly. Its creation required tools the class had already learned and perfected several times before. 3.8.1 Figure 10 (a) (b) Figure 10(a) is a slotted bolt. The slot on the top side of the shaft is what gives the model its name; Figure 10(b) shows the bolt’s hexagonal cut into the top of the head. The bolt is very similar to the hexagonal bolt in Figure 6. 12 | P a g e
  13. 13. 3.9 The Base Plate The base plate is where the entire assembly will ultimately be mounted. Despite being the largest piece, its construction was relatively easy. 3.9.1 Figure 11 (a) (b) Figure 11(a) is the base plate; Figure 11(b) is the reverse side of the base plate; It was symmetrical so nothing really changed as one may notice. 13 | P a g e
  14. 14. 3.10 The Assembly The Assembly Drawing was a really test of the class’s ProE proficiency. The class learned how to make and assembly drawing, add parts to an assembly drawing, properly align said parts, and produced an explode view of an assembly. 3.10.1 Figure 12 (a) (b) Figure 12(a) is a picture of the assembly; Figure 12(b) is a look from another angle. By far, the assembly was the most challenging part of the assignment. 4 Discussion Unlike last time, most of the actually CAD modeling in ProE went off without a hitch. The class seemed much more prepared and competent in this use of the ProE software. Additionally, most of the parts were of less than exotic pieces. Also noted in the Results, the bushing and the washer were really even the same part. The model was not a problem this time. What was a problem, however, was the assembly drawing. The first problem that I encountered was the disproportionate size of my parts. Apparently I had accidently forgotten to change the default template for some drawings and wound up with some drawings in millimeters and some in inches. My bracket appeared to be mountain to comparison to my washer. It was disconcerting, frustrating, time- consuming. I estimate I lost an hour trying to figure out what was wrong. 14 | P a g e
  15. 15. The actual alignment in the exploded view was actually difficult as well. The mating and aligning for the complete draw came to me relatively quickly, but the exploded view stuff was very counter intuitive. I was actually disappointed that ProE’s “explosions” are not better regulated by the computer. I spent at least half an hour trying to move each piece into an appropriate place. 5 Conclusion The class learned many different new features on ProE. We can now see that ProE can do more than model simple parts; It can also represent entire, assembled machines. This will be invaluable for our final project and in the real world. 6 References Toogood, Roger. Pro Engineer Wildfire 4.0. Edmonton, Alberta: ProCAD Books Ltd, 2006. 15 | P a g e

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