FEWER MOBILE TOWERS  =MORE RADIATION
Introduction    Radiation scare is leading to a clampdown on    mobile tower installations    The most discernible fallo...
ButWeaker signals are forcing mobile handsets to   compensate by ramping up transmission                      power This r...
    In September 2012, Rajasthan High Court    ordered banning the deployment of cell towers    atop schools and hospital...
    In Jaipur, around 350-400 towers are    estimated to have been shut down, while    in Mumbai around 100 towers have ...
   The ministry lowered the EMF radiation levels    for mobile tower antennas by one-tenth of the    existing ICNIRP (Int...
    In India, the Specific Absorption Rate (the rate    at which radio frequency energy is absorbed in    the human body ...
Conclusion    Opposition to towers by residents in an area is    a bigger concern, as this may lead to towers    going of...
Conclusion    India depends almost exclusively on wireless    technologies like cell phones for connectivity    and lacks...
Conclusion    Companies are also trying to find a solution to    the problem of towers being installed on    buildings  ...
Thank Youwww.theradiationdoctor.wordpress.com
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Fewer mobile towers, more radiation

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Is bringing down cell towers really an end to the radiation problem? Or are we putting ourselves into more trouble?

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Fewer mobile towers, more radiation

  1. 1. FEWER MOBILE TOWERS =MORE RADIATION
  2. 2. Introduction Radiation scare is leading to a clampdown on mobile tower installations The most discernible fallout is the rising incidence of call drops in cities such as Delhi and Mumbai.
  3. 3. ButWeaker signals are forcing mobile handsets to compensate by ramping up transmission power This results in higher radiation exposure for users from the phone itself
  4. 4.  In September 2012, Rajasthan High Court ordered banning the deployment of cell towers atop schools and hospitals Ever since, the crackdown on them has intensified Jaipur, Mumbai and Delhi being the three worst-affected cities.
  5. 5.  In Jaipur, around 350-400 towers are estimated to have been shut down, while in Mumbai around 100 towers have been shut In Delhi, around 100 towers now estimated to be shut
  6. 6.  The ministry lowered the EMF radiation levels for mobile tower antennas by one-tenth of the existing ICNIRP (International Commission on Non-Ionising Radiation Protection) exposure level, effective September 1, 2012. Indian standards are now effectively 10 times more stringent than more than 90 per cent of the countries, according to the Department of Telecom.
  7. 7.  In India, the Specific Absorption Rate (the rate at which radio frequency energy is absorbed in the human body over a given time) prescribed for cellphones is 1.6 watt/ kg averaged over one gram of human tissue. From September 2013, all mobile handsets have to carry the respective SAR limit.
  8. 8. Conclusion Opposition to towers by residents in an area is a bigger concern, as this may lead to towers going off colonies, which will impact the overall service
  9. 9. Conclusion India depends almost exclusively on wireless technologies like cell phones for connectivity and lacks an adequate fixed line (copper wire) or optical fibre network to fall back on This again means that to manage adequate connectivity with a lesser number of towers, there would be the need to radiate more power, thus exacerbating the very harm that towers reportedly cause.
  10. 10. Conclusion Companies are also trying to find a solution to the problem of towers being installed on buildings They are now trying to bunch their requirements on to common towers to reduce their footprint
  11. 11. Thank Youwww.theradiationdoctor.wordpress.com

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