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The Junction Gardens BIA 
Streetscape Master Plan Vision
STREETSCAPE MASTER PLAN VISION i 
TABLE OF CONTENTS 
1.0 INTRODUCTION........................................................
ii THE JUNCTION GARDENS BIA 
4.7 Lighting....................................................................................
STREETSCAPE MASTER PLAN VISION 1 
1.0 INTRODUCTION 
1.1 Study Area 
The Junction Gardens BIA Streetscape Master Plan Visio...
2 THE JUNCTION GARDENS BIA
STREETSCAPE MASTER PLAN VISION 3 
2.0 VISUAL INVENTORY 
2.1 Observations 
The following observations were noted during a v...
This interface with the area is unattractive and uninviting. 
Arts and Culture 
While the BIA is known as one of the more ...
Tree Pits Concrete Planters Seasonal Plantings 
STREETSCAPE MASTER PLAN VISION 5
Street Flankages 
High Park Avenue – South East Side 
High Park Avenue – South West Side 
Dundas St. W. and Medland St. – ...
STREETSCAPE MASTER PLAN VISION 7 
Keele Street Underpass 
Keele and Dundas Pacific Avenue 
BMO Parking Lot – Keele & Dunda...
8 THE JUNCTION GARDENS BIA
STREETSCAPE MASTER PLAN VISION 9 
3.0 VISION AND DESIGN PRINCIPLES 
Fundamental to the creation of a master plan is, first...
3.2 Design Principles 
The following design principles provide the foundation for 
development of this Streetscape Master ...
STREETSCAPE MASTER PLAN VISION 11 
4.0 STREETSCAPE KIT OF PARTS AND RECOMMENDATIONS 
Dundas Street W 
Quebec Ave 
Mcmurray...
4.1 Gateways to The Junction Gardens BIA 
Typically located at community entry points, gateways signal 
arrival into the c...
STREETSCAPE MASTER PLAN VISION 13 
Recommendations: 
Declutter the intersection by removing BIA signage and relocating 
do...
4.1.2 Pacific Avenue 
While it is less prominent than Dundas Street West and Keele 
Street, the intersection of Dundas Str...
STREETSCAPE MASTER PLAN VISION 15 
4.1.3 Keele Street Underpass 
While it is located outside BIA boundaries, the Keele Str...
4.2 Flankage Parkettes 
Flankages are wide setback areas located adjacent to corner 
buildings on the streets that interse...
STREETSCAPE MASTER PLAN VISION 17 
4.3 Parklets 
Parklets are small park-like spaces that often occupy parking spaces 
as ...
4.4 Street Trees 
Street trees and plantings soften and humanize the scale of the 
streetscape. Trees in particular are as...
STREETSCAPE MASTER PLAN VISION 19 
4.4.3 Tree Grilles 
Tree grilles are typically placed around the trees at the level of ...
4.5 Paving Materials 
Paving materials are important to the appearance and function of a street. They 
offer visual cues a...
STREETSCAPE MASTER PLAN VISION 21 
4.6 Streetscape Furnishings 
Street furnishings should be functional and attractive ele...
22 THE JUNCTION GARDENS BIA 
Recommendations: 
Implement furnishings from the City of 
Toronto’s Coordinated Street Furnit...
STREETSCAPE MASTER PLAN VISION 23 
4.7 Lighting 
Lighting is crucial to creating a safe and vibrant streetscape 
throughou...
4.7.2 Decorative Pedestrian Lighting 
The existing light standard along Dundas Street West is designed 
to accommodate ped...
STREETSCAPE MASTER PLAN VISION 25 
4.8 Public Art 
The Junction is known for its thriving arts and design community, 
and ...
26 THE JUNCTION GARDENS BIA 
Figure 5.3ca Examples 
of a planted parking lot 
buffer 
Figures 5.3c & d: 
Example of a mass...
Where A-frame or sandwich board signs are used, they should be 
located to avoid obstructing the path of pedestrians, whee...
APPENDIX
The Junction BIA streetscape master plan vision document
The Junction BIA streetscape master plan vision document
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The Junction BIA streetscape master plan vision document

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master plan vision document

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The Junction BIA streetscape master plan vision document

  1. 1. The Junction Gardens BIA Streetscape Master Plan Vision
  2. 2. STREETSCAPE MASTER PLAN VISION i TABLE OF CONTENTS 1.0 INTRODUCTION..........................................................................................1 1.1 Study Area.....................................................................................................1 1.2 Purpose of the Document........................................................................1 2.0 VISUAL INVENTORY....................................................................................3 2.1 Observations................................................................................................3 2.2 Existing Conditions Imagery..................................................................4 3.0 VISION AND DESIGN PRINCIPLES..........................................................9 3.1 A Vision for The Junction BIA..................................................................9 3.2 Design Principles..................................................................................... 10 4.0 STREETSCAPE KIT OF PARTS AND RECOMMENDATIONS........................................................................... 11 4.1 Gateways to the Junction Gardens BIA........................................... 12 4.1.1 Keele Street Intersection............................................................ 12 4.1.2 Pacific Avenue................................................................................ 14 4.1.3 Keele Street Underpass............................................................... 15 4.2 Flankage Parkettes.................................................................................. 16 4.3 Parklets........................................................................................................ 17 4.4 Street Trees................................................................................................ 18 4.4.1 Tree Inventory................................................................................ 18 4.4.2 Tree Guards..................................................................................... 18 4.4.3 Tree Grilles....................................................................................... 19 4.5 Paving Materials....................................................................................... 20 4.6 Streetscape Furnishings........................................................................ 21 4.6.1 City of Toronto Coordinated Street Furniture.................... 21 4.6.2 Custom-Designed Furnishings................................................ 21 4.6.3 Streetscape Demonstrations................................................... 22
  3. 3. ii THE JUNCTION GARDENS BIA 4.7 Lighting....................................................................................................... 23 4.7.1 Street Lighting............................................................................... 23 4.7.2 Decorative Pedestrian Lighting.............................................. 24 4.8 Public Art.................................................................................................... 25 4.9 Buffers and Screening............................................................................ 26 5.0 ADDITIONAL RECOMMENDATIONS.................................................. 27 5.1 Cycling Conditions.................................................................................. 27 5.2 Storefronts and Signage....................................................................... 27 APPENDIX Opportunities Plan Phasing and Costing Matrix
  4. 4. STREETSCAPE MASTER PLAN VISION 1 1.0 INTRODUCTION 1.1 Study Area The Junction Gardens BIA Streetscape Master Plan Vision covers the eight blocks along Dundas Street West from Quebec Avenue to Indian Grove. The Junction Gardens BIA represents a very active, creative and engaged community of people with a wide variety of backgrounds and interests, that makes this area of Toronto one of the most distinctive and interesting neighbourhoods to live, work and visit. The streetscape treatment along Dundas Street West should strive to capture and reflect the energy that defines this neighbourhood, as well as consider the cultural significance of its history. 1.2 Purpose of the Document The master plan is intended to provide a framework to facilitate decision-making related to present and future streetscape improvements within the Junction Gardens BIA, with a view to integrating the history and identity of the neighbourhood by enhancing business and establishing the district as a destination. The document presents the results of a visual inventory, followed by mapping of key opportunities for intervention and a ‘kit of parts’, or tool kit, of potential interventions. Lastly, the document offers some guidance with respect to phasing of projects along with estimates to help the BIA plan and budget for improvements. 1.1a: Diagram showing the study area boundary
  5. 5. 2 THE JUNCTION GARDENS BIA
  6. 6. STREETSCAPE MASTER PLAN VISION 3 2.0 VISUAL INVENTORY 2.1 Observations The following observations were noted during a visual inventory of the streets within the BIA. Landscape Elements Street Trees • Street trees are numerous in the BIA compared to other districts within the City. The greatest number of trees are found along Dundas Street West. In total, there are 133 street trees in the BIA: 61 on the north side, and 72 on the south side. • Of the BIA’s 133 street trees, 21 are growing in concrete planters, the design of which varies according to when they were installed. Tree pits are also varied in their design. (Refer to the images in Section 2.2, Existing Conditions Imagery.) • It is worth noting that trees on both sides of the street receive sunlight. Paving Sidewalks and Crosswalks • The sidewalks along Dundas Street West, where the majority of street furnishings are located, range in width between approximately 3.0 and 4.0 meters. • Sidewalk paving treatments were installed fairly recently and correspond to the standard City detail. • Crosswalks are generally not strongly demarcated, and line painting has faded. Furnishings Bus Shelters • With the exception of a few, bus shelters have for the most part been updated to the new City standard as part of the Coordinated Street Furniture Program. Litter Bins • The number of litter bins is adequate according to the BIA. However a number of bins, which correspond to the City’s coordinated street furniture program, are in disrepair. Newspaper Boxes • While generally clustered, newspaper boxes are not neatly arranged, which may cause hazards for pedestrians. Corrals would help organize the boxes and help keep them in place. Benches and Seating • Benches are found sporadically along Dundas. Amenity areas and opportunities for social interaction are lacking in the public realm. Lighting Street Lighting • Street lights along Dundas Street West were installed recently. Their design and placement creates rhythm along the street. • Along Keele Street, light standards are inconsistent in both their type and spacing. • While the current light standards along Dundas Street West allow for pedestrian lighting, there currently is none installed. Two light standards along Keele Street provide pedestrian lighting. Keele Street Underpass While the Keele Street railway bridge is located outside the limits of the BIA, the underpass serves as a point of entry into the area. However, the underpass is poorly lit, creating an unsafe condition for pedestrians and cyclists both day and night.
  7. 7. This interface with the area is unattractive and uninviting. Arts and Culture While the BIA is known as one of the more creative districts within the City, there are few public art pieces, and an overall design theme could help focus efforts to increase the presence of the arts. 2.2 Existing Conditions Imagery Pedestrian Crossings Bus Shelters 4 THE JUNCTION GARDENS BIA Litter Bin Light Standards Bench
  8. 8. Tree Pits Concrete Planters Seasonal Plantings STREETSCAPE MASTER PLAN VISION 5
  9. 9. Street Flankages High Park Avenue – South East Side High Park Avenue – South West Side Dundas St. W. and Medland St. – South West Side 6 THE JUNCTION GARDENS BIA Edges Canadian Tire Gas Bar – Keele Street Heintzman Street – South Side Heintzman Street – West Side Rear of Gas Bar
  10. 10. STREETSCAPE MASTER PLAN VISION 7 Keele Street Underpass Keele and Dundas Pacific Avenue BMO Parking Lot – Keele & Dundas Looking West Pacific Avenue – North East Side Pacific Avenue – North West Side Keele St. Underpass Looking North Keele St. Underpass Looking South Underside of Keele St. Underpass BMO Parking Lot – Keele & Dundas Image Sources: Google Earth, Junction BIA, and NAK Design Strategies
  11. 11. 8 THE JUNCTION GARDENS BIA
  12. 12. STREETSCAPE MASTER PLAN VISION 9 3.0 VISION AND DESIGN PRINCIPLES Fundamental to the creation of a master plan is, first and foremost, the establishment of a vision. In order to stimulate the interest of community members, focus efforts, leverage investment of time and money and sustain commitment over an extended period of time, the project vision needs to rally and energize the entire community. 3.1 A Vision for The Junction BIA The Junction BIA encompasses an area of the City that is rich with history, creativity and culture. Historically the intersection of two Native Canadian trading trails, and later the junction of major railway lines, today’s Junction still bears the imprint of the industrial landscape that once took shape there. Steeped in railway and industrial heritage, the neighbourhood is home to families and businesses that have contributed to the area’s renaissance and continue to spur its transformation into a hotbed of design, art and culture. Inspired by the area’s railway legacy and the unruly beauty of this post-industrial landscape, the streetscape master plan vision provides an organizing framework that further strengthens the central theme of the Junction as a point of convergence for business, culture, the arts and shared community values. KEY DESIGN THEMES Railway Heritage The Junction as Meeting Place Promote the Arts, Design and Culture PROJECT VISION Create a distinct identity within the Junction Gardens BIA, establishing the area as a destination within the City, and stimulating business and investment, for the benefit of residents and businesses alike.
  13. 13. 3.2 Design Principles The following design principles provide the foundation for development of this Streetscape Master Plan Vision. KEEP IT SIMPLE Integrate clean and contemporary materials and furnishings into the streetscape. Strive for an uncluttered approach. ENHANCE SAFETY For safety and aesthetic reasons, streetscape elements should ensure visual transparency and avoid cluttering of the street. Lighting is also crucial to safety. CELEBRATE HERITAGE To connect us to our past as we look toward the future, streetscape design elements should honour and celebrate the historic fabric and character of the area. CREATE MEETING PLACES Provide opportunities for organized and chance encounters, and where social interaction can take place spontaneously and with ease and comfort. CURATE LOCAL CULTURE Encourage the thriving art and design culture within The Junction by partnering with local creative resources to implement components of the master plan. STIMULATE BUSINESS AND INVESTMENT Streetscape enhancements should stimulate business and act as a catalyst for new investments into the public realm. 10 THE JUNCTION GARDENS BIA
  14. 14. STREETSCAPE MASTER PLAN VISION 11 4.0 STREETSCAPE KIT OF PARTS AND RECOMMENDATIONS Dundas Street W Quebec Ave Mcmurray Ave High Park Ave Pacific Ave Pacific Ave Indian Gr Medland St Mavety St Keele St Keele St Heintzman St Indian Gr Quebec Ave Dundas Street W Dundas Street W Quebec Ave Mcmurray Ave High Park Ave Pacific Ave Pacific Ave Indian Gr Medland St Mavety St Keele St Keele St Heintzman St Indian Gr Quebec Ave Dundas Street W Keele Street Underpass Keele and Dundas Street Pacific Avenue Flankage Condition Existing Flankage with Patio Hotspots Public Art or Mural This section maps a series of opportunities for streetscape interventions in various categories, and presents a ‘kit-of-parts’, or tool kit, of possible interventions. Each section is accompanied by a set of recommendations for next steps or implementation. The diagram below identifies the key opportunities, and the following pages describe potential interventions. An overall Opportunities Plan showing both opportunities and existing conditions is included in the Appendix. 4.0: Diagram showing key opportunities and areas for intervention
  15. 15. 4.1 Gateways to The Junction Gardens BIA Typically located at community entry points, gateways signal arrival into the community, creating an initial impression of the character and identity of the neighbourhood. While The Junction Gardens BIA spans the blocks between Indian Grove and Quebec Avenue, the key intersections are located at Keele Street and Pacific Avenue. Furthermore, while it is not located within BIA boundaries, the Keele Street underpass constitutes an important point of entry into The Junction, and is also part of the master plan study area. 4.1.1 Keele Street Intersection The intersection at Dundas Street West and Keele Street is considered a major gateway due to its location at the intersection of two arterial roads and the scale of surrounding buildings. This location, with three of its four corners featuring older buildings oriented towards the intersection, is ideal for creation of a major gateway experience. 12 THE JUNCTION GARDENS BIA decorative crosswalks custom gateway feature possible gathering space/ parkette potential parking lot screen 4.1.1b: Diagram showing the intersection of Keele and Dundas, with opportunities for intervention 4.1.1a: Image showing the existing intersection
  16. 16. STREETSCAPE MASTER PLAN VISION 13 Recommendations: Declutter the intersection by removing BIA signage and relocating donation boxes; Utilize a news corral to organize newspaper boxes; Consider decorative paving to define the intersection, provide traffic calming and enhance pedestrian safety; Update the old bus shelters along Keele Street to the newer model according to the City’s Coordinated Street Furniture Program; Engage the owner of the Bank of Montreal property in updating the existing feature adjacent to the bank and transforming it into an vibrant gathering space with potential to integrate a custom gateway feature such as a railway inspired clock or a custom-designed art piece, enhanced plantings, special paving, feature lighting and wayfinding elements; Consider integrating a railway-inspired gateway feature such as a clock into the proposed Bank of Montreal amenity space on the south west corner of the intersection; Consider an artful fence or screen treatment to attenuate the impact of the Bank of Montreal parking lot. 4.1.1c, d & e: Examples of a gathering space / parkette (top left), special pedestrian crosswalk treatments (top right) and an artful fence screening treatment (bottom left) 4.1.1f & g: Examples of modern and heritage railway station clocks as a potential gateway feature
  17. 17. 4.1.2 Pacific Avenue While it is less prominent than Dundas Street West and Keele Street, the intersection of Dundas Street West and Pacific Avenue is another intersection with potential for creation of a gateway. The BIA currently uses a stretch of Pacific Avenue north of Dundas as a place to host its events. There is potential to create a more pedestrian-friendly zone in this area for regular activities to take place, such as farmer’s markets, festivals, etc., through implementation of a Woonerf street. The example in figure 4.1.2a to the right shows a recently implemented Woonerf street in Toronto’s St. Lawrence Market. Woonerfs are sometimes defined as ‘living streets’ where pedestrians and cyclists have priority over motorists. They are often characterized by shared pedestrian-vehicular space, traffic calming, low speed limits, special paving and a curbless design. Recommendations: Introduce special crosswalk paving to enhance safety and define the area as a gateway; Consider transforming the portion of Pacific Avenue north of Dundas into a Woonerf street as a place to host BIA activities and events; Working with property owners, businesses and the City, design attractive side flankage treatments along Pacific Avenue, integrating permanent or temporary public art. 14 THE JUNCTION GARDENS BIA 4.1.2a: Market Street in Toronto’s St. Lawrence district features special paving and is defined by bollards; pedestrians and vehicles share the street with potential for traffic closures during events BIA event space / Woonerf street flankage parkette or other special flankage treatment decorative crosswalks to identify the area as a gateway public art opportunity expanded seating area with existing public art 4.1.2b: Diagram showing the intersection of Pacific and Dundas, with potential interventions
  18. 18. STREETSCAPE MASTER PLAN VISION 15 4.1.3 Keele Street Underpass While it is located outside BIA boundaries, the Keele Street underpass constitutes an important point of entry into The Junction, and has been included within the master plan study area. Currently, the underpass is unattractive and makes a poor impression for visitors from the north. Furthermore, it is inadequately lit and poses a safety risk for pedestrians and cyclists. There is an opportunity to transform this area into a safer and more appealing place. Recommendations: Improve lighting within the underpass, using safety lighting or an artful light display that both improves light levels and serves as a decorative feature; Consider painting the underpass bridge (on both the north and south sides, and on the underside) to create an attractive and memorable point of entry / exit; Consider murals or other art displays within the underpass to create a more engaging experience. 4.1.3a: Image showing the approach to the underpass from the south side of Keele Street 4.1.3b, c & d: Images showing possible underpass treatments, including bridge painting (top left), safety lighting and murals (top right) and decorative lighting (bottom left)
  19. 19. 4.2 Flankage Parkettes Flankages are wide setback areas located adjacent to corner buildings on the streets that intersect with Dundas, for example, Pacific Avenue or Medland Street. While some side flankages adjacent to restaurants and cafés are used to provide patio space for patrons, many of them are used as car parks or simply underutilized. These side flankages present excellent opportunities for greening or transformation into parkettes or small amenity spaces for the public to enjoy. They lend themselves to integration of amenities such as seating and bicycle or stroller parking. As gathering spaces, flankage parkettes provide opportunities for social interaction, contributing to building social capital within neighbourhoods. The diagram below identifies locations that lend themselves to the establishment of parkettes. Flankages greater than 4.0 meters from building face to edge of curb are deemed large enough for special flankage treatments. The Opportunities Plan in the Appendix also shows possible flankage locations. Recommendations: 16 THE JUNCTION GARDENS BIA Work with property owners, businesses and the City to design attractive side flankages that are compatible with adjacent businesses and support community activities; Consider introducing amenities such as bicycle or stroller parking within flankage parkettes; Integrate permanent or temporary public art into flankage parkettes. Dundas Street W Quebec Ave Mcmurray Ave High Park Ave Pacific Ave Pacific Ave Indian Gr Medland St Mavety St Keele St Keele St Heintzman St Indian Gr Quebec Ave Dundas Street W Flankage Opportunities Existing Flankage with Patio 4.2a: Diagram showing flankage locations 4.2b, c & d: Images showing examples of flankage parkettes integrating seating and greening, bike parking and public art
  20. 20. STREETSCAPE MASTER PLAN VISION 17 4.3 Parklets Parklets are small park-like spaces that often occupy parking spaces as an extension of the sidewalk, but can also be located at flankage locations. Parklets may be thought of as permanent or temporary, but are always designed to be removable if necessary. They provide amenities and green space along the street, and offer a place to stop, sit and rest or engage in street life. Like flankage parkettes, they have the potential to stimulate social interaction and help build social capital. Individually-designed parklets can be viewed as works of art in and of themselves, and present an excellent opportunity for creative expression. While they may be hosted by individual businesses, parklets should ideally be designed as public spaces that are open to all rather than business-specific amenities that represent a form of privatisation of public space. Recommendations: Work with property owners, businesses and the City to design and implement parklets, either permanently or temporarily; The BIA should consider alternative forms of funding for implementation of parklets, such as partnering with local businesses to design and install the parklets, perhaps under a sponsorship funding model. 4.3a, b, c & d: Images showing examples of parklets, which may be implemented along the street edge or at flankages
  21. 21. 4.4 Street Trees Street trees and plantings soften and humanize the scale of the streetscape. Trees in particular are assets that increase curb appeal and should be given a high degree of design consideration. While our city streets offer challenging conditions for growing trees, opportunities also exist to green the street with planters. For additional information about planters, see Section 4.6, Streetscape Furnishings. 4.4.1 Tree Inventory The BIA boasts 133 street trees, 61 of which are located on the north side of Dundas Street West, and 72 on the south side. A total of 21 trees on the north side of Dundas Street West are currently encased in concrete planters. Different types of tree pits (ranging in size from 1.1m x 1.2m to 1.1m to 2.5m) are found within the BIA (refer to page 7 for images). These variations can be seen across the City, and reflect the fact that trees have been added to the streetscape at different periods in time. Despite these differences, it is possible to achieve a consistent appearance by applying the same treatment to all tree pits, regardless of size. This can be achieved by removing unit pavers within tree pits and applying a layer of mulch as in the example on the following page. 18 THE JUNCTION GARDENS BIA Many of the trees along Dundas Street West are young trees planted relatively recently, and multiple different species are present. Because the north side of Dundas Street West receives sunlight, the trees located on the this side of the street have the potential to succeed. However the BIA reports that each year some of its trees succumb to damage. Tree protection is desirable to ensure that trees are not abused of damaged by object strikes or bicycles. 4.4.2 Tree Guards Young trees in urban conditions require protection from wind, animals, vandalism and urban traffic. In areas of high pedestrian and vehicular traffic in particular, metal tree guards offer protection and add to the appeal of the streetscape. The guards should be large enough to avoid impacting or inhibiting the growth of trees and be visually coordinated with the streetscape and street furniture. The guards are available in a variety of heights and finishes, and can also be designed to accommodate displays of flowers. Refer to page 22 for a streetscape demonstration drawing showing a custom-designed tree guard mounted with flower baskets. Refer to the following page for examples of tree guards.
  22. 22. STREETSCAPE MASTER PLAN VISION 19 4.4.3 Tree Grilles Tree grilles are typically placed around the trees at the level of the surrounding surface paving to reduce soil compaction and root zone damage caused by pedestrian traffic. Tree grilles may be employed adjacent to new residential development sites where pedestrian traffic is anticipated to be significant. The design and colour of the grille should be coordinated with that of the tree guard. Recommendations: Remove concrete planters encasing trees and place trees at grade; Achieve a more consistent tree pit look by removing unit pavers from those pits that feature them and applying a layer of mulch at the base of all trees; Implement tree guards to protect young trees from damage and ensure their health as they establish themselves and grow; In high traffic areas, such as where new, higher-density developments are planned, there is potential to apply a tree grille treatment to tree pits to prevent soil compaction and ensure tree health; Encourage business owners to participate in keeping trees looking attractive and healthy by removing debris from tree pits and watering in times of drought; Investigate opportunities for infill tree plantings in consultation with Urban Forestry. 4.4.3b: Example of tree guards and grilles 4.4.3a: Example of mulched tree pits with tree guard
  23. 23. 4.5 Paving Materials Paving materials are important to the appearance and function of a street. They offer visual cues about the function of the street, delineate different zones and even provide traffic calming. Pedestrian crossings that are demarcated with special paving signal to vehicles that they are entering a new zone, and improve pedestrian safety as a result. This master plan envisions special paving treatments to define pedestrian crosswalks in order to enhance safety, define gateways and create identity within the district. This special treatment should preferably consist of thermal plastic inlay asphalt, which is available in various colours and designs. However, should The Junction achieve heritage status, treatments such as precast unit paving may be considered. 20 THE JUNCTION GARDENS BIA 4.5b: Concrete and unit paver crosswalk 4.5c: Thermal plastic inlay crosswalk Dundas Street W Quebec Ave Mcmurray Ave High Park Ave Pacific Ave Pacific Ave Indian Gr Medland St Mavety St Keele St Keele St Heintzman St Indian Gr Quebec Ave Dundas Street W 4.5a: Diagram showing possible locations for implementation of special pedestrian crosswalk treatments 4.5d: Well-defined crosswalks enhance pedestrian safety and provide traffic calming at intersections Recommendation: Implement special paving treatments at crosswalks to enhance pedestrian safety, define intersections, emphasize gateway locations and create identity within the district.
  24. 24. STREETSCAPE MASTER PLAN VISION 21 4.6 Streetscape Furnishings Street furnishings should be functional and attractive elements of the streetscape that don’t contribute to visual clutter. Generally speaking, they should be consistent with the City’s Coordinated Street Furniture Program, with some flexibility for a unique, custom-designed pieces such as a planter or bike ring. There are two categories of furnishings: • Standard furnishings are located along the streetscape and adhere to City of Toronto guidelines for placement (refer to the Vibrant Streets Street Furniture Design and Policy Guidelines); • Custom furnishings such as a bike ring or a planter could be designed and fabricated especially for the BIA, possibly engaging local talent, and located in special areas such as at flankages or gateway locations. 4.6.1 City of Toronto Coordinated Street Furniture bus shelter bench bulletin board litter bin news corral bike ring 4.6.2 Custom-Designed Furnishings Planters offer an additional means of greening the street and bringing seasonal interest to the streetscape. The BIA may encourage its businesses to install and maintain their own storefront planters, or it may choose to design and implement a custom planter to be installed along the street edge. Custom bike rings may also represent a cost-effective means of expressing the BIA’s distinct identity. Recommendations: Should the BIA choose to implement a custom-designed planter, it should be placed along the same line and within the same zone as other street furnishings such as benches, bike rings, etc., and paired with a light standard wherever possible to create a rhythm along the street. With respect to custom bike rings, they should be located at flankage conditions or in special locations; preference should be given to the City’s standard bike rings in all other locations along the street edge. Refer to the next page for a streetscape demonstration drawing showing a custom-designed planter. 4.6.2: Example of a custom-designed planter (left) and bike ring (right)
  25. 25. 22 THE JUNCTION GARDENS BIA Recommendations: Implement furnishings from the City of Toronto’s Coordinated Street Furniture Program; When selecting new and replacement furnishings from the City’s Coordinated Street Furniture Program, choose the black options; The opportunity exists to install additional bike rings throughout the BIA. Refer to the Vibrant Streets Street Furniture Design and Policy Guidelines for information on locating bike rings. Consider pairings or groupings where space allows. Remember that locating bike rings in proximity to tree guards will deter cyclists from tying their bicycles to trees guards; Consider commissioning local talent to design and fabricate one or two signature pieces for the BIA, such as a custom bike ring or planter; Standard and custom-designed street furnishings all present opportunities for branding, either by their unique design or through use of the BIA logo. When implementing new furnishings, the BIA may consider taking advantage of the option to have its logo placed on various pieces, such as benches, litter bins, etc. 4.6.3 Streetscape Demonstrations 4.6.3a: Streetscape demonstration showing a custom-designed planter element 4.6.3b: Streetscape demonstration showing a custom-designed tree guard mounted with flower baskets.
  26. 26. STREETSCAPE MASTER PLAN VISION 23 4.7 Lighting Lighting is crucial to creating a safe and vibrant streetscape throughout the evening and night, enhance the appearance of the street, and create a strong identity within a district. 4.7.1 Street Lighting New lighting was implemented along Dundas Street West relatively recently, at the same time that utility lines were buried. The black light standards are distinctive, and create a uniform rhythm along the street. Two key areas are identified for intervention related to lighting: • Keele Street is an important arterial road that currently features different types and styles of light standards; • Pacific Avenue fulfills an important role with respect to festivals and other events for the BIA, yet lighting does not address its role or special uses. There is an opportunity to reinforce the identity along both streets by coordinating their light fixtures with those found along Dundas Street 4.7b: Light standard along Keele Street 4.7c: Light standard along Dundas Street West 4.7a: Diagram showing possible locations for intervention related to lighting Decorative Pedestrian Lighting Lighting Coordinated with Dundas Street Light Standards
  27. 27. 4.7.2 Decorative Pedestrian Lighting The existing light standard along Dundas Street West is designed to accommodate pedestrian-scaled lighting. There may also be potential to utilize these light standards to introduce a decorative pedestrian lighting fixture, creating a distinct identity for the BIA, and bringing year-round interest to the streetscape with elements that bring colour and life to the street during the cold, dark winter months. 24 THE JUNCTION GARDENS BIA Recommendations: Coordinate light standards along Keele Street and Pacific Avenue with the black standards currently found along Dundas Street West; Rather than lighting trees, which is costly and can damage the trees over time, consider implementing a signature light fixture which can be mounted directly onto existing light standards at pedestrian level. This will allow the BIA to eliminate the electrical outlets currently mounted to the trees; The BIA should consider engaging local designers in developing a signature decorative pedestrian light fixture for the BIA. 4.7.2a, b & c: Examples of light standards mounted with a decorative pedestrian fixture
  28. 28. STREETSCAPE MASTER PLAN VISION 25 4.8 Public Art The Junction is known for its thriving arts and design community, and the BIA should consider engaging local talent to help curate arts and culture in the area. The Streetscape Master Plan Vision identifies key opportunities for public art installations within the community. Public art may be permanent or temporary, and consideration should be given to contemporary art forms. Refer to the Opportunities Plan in the Appendix for proposed locations. A number of art forms lend themselves well to implementation within the BIA: • Murals are a familiar art form within Toronto that add interest to the streetscape; • Sculptures are an excellent way of commemorating important places or events, and can be combined with plaques or interpretive features; • Urban or street projections are an emerging form of expression in Europe and many North American cities that involve projecting an image onto a building wall or façade. Projections may consist of artwork, or the BIA could consider using this technology to advertise events or communicate messages to the community without having to install signs. Even short films could be projected in this manner. Similar to murals, blank walls and even building façades are suitable canvases for urban projections. However, care must be taken to avoid locations that impact residents when projecting directly onto building façades or near windows. 4.8a, b & c: Examples of street projections, which can be curated to be ever-changing features of the landscape Recommendations: The BIA should continue to pursue opportunities to implement sculptures and murals within the BIA; As much as possible, the BIA should engage local artists to design and implement art pieces and installations; The BIA should explore street projections as a way to distinguish itself from other neighbourhoods in the City and further integrate the arts into BIA programming. 4.8d, e & f: Examples of murals (top left), paving inlays (bottom left) and a railway inspired sculpture (above)
  29. 29. 26 THE JUNCTION GARDENS BIA Figure 5.3ca Examples of a planted parking lot buffer Figures 5.3c & d: Example of a mass planting of grasses and perennials 4.9 Buffers and Screening Within the BIA, there are locations along the street that would lend themselves to implementation of buffers or screening, either to screen land uses or to create a continuous street edge. Screening may consist of plantings alone or in combination with fencing, or perhaps even fencing embellished with decorative elements. Well-placed buffers or screening can enhance the appeal of the streetscape and create attractive views from various vantage points. The Opportunities Plan in the appendix identifies potential locations for implementation of buffer or screening elements. Figure 5.3b: Example of a screen consisting of fencing embellished with decorative elements Recommendations: The BIA should consider engaging property owners to explore the potential to screen those locations that contribute to an unattractive streetscape; In locations that don’t lend themselves to planted buffers, such as when light conditions are inadequate or there is insufficient space to accommodate them, the BIA should consider other methods of screening such as fencing embellished with decorative elements; When selecting species for planted buffers, preference should be given to drought and salt tolerant species with an emphasis on natives. Consideration should also be given to plant species that maintain structure and provide interest during the winter months. The use of mass plantings is particularly appropriate to the established design theme, as they evoke the meadow and forest landscapes often found along railway lines.
  30. 30. Where A-frame or sandwich board signs are used, they should be located to avoid obstructing the path of pedestrians, wheelchairs and strollers; Encourage businesses and property owners to enhance the architectural aspects of their properties, such as brickwork, windows and entrances; Where compatible with business activity, encourage café or outdoor seating that extends the indoors out, animating and enlivening the streetscape; Encourage property owners to allow window-dressing of vacant store fronts, for advertising by local businesses or for temporary art installations; To contribute to greening of the street, encourage businesses to install and maintain storefront planters. STREETSCAPE MASTER PLAN VISION 27 5.0 ADDITIONAL RECOMMENDATIONS 5.1 Cycling Conditions BIA residents and business owners alike have expressed the desire to see cycling conditions improved within the neighbourhood. While a pedestrian and cycling study was outside the scope of this master plan vision exercize, the BIA should actively involve itself in efforts to improve conditions for cyclists, working with the City as well as local residents and cycling advocacy groups. 5.2 Storefront and Signage The shops, businesses and residents located along Dundas Street West and intersecting streets are vital to the success of The Junction Gardens BIA. They draw people to the area and generate activities that enliven the neighbourhood. Storefront and residential entrances and signage are critical elements of the streetscape, and it is incumbent upon all businesses and property owners to take part in creating attractive storefronts and entrances, and maintaining the streetscape outside their front door. Recommendations: Assist businesses in taking advantage of the City of Toronto Commercial Façade Improvement Program for help in redesigning, renovating or restoring commercial building façades; Consider developing signage guidelines to help harmonize signage without curtailing originality; Encourage business owners to create engaging window displays to highlight the BIA’s unique array of goods and services; Encourage pedestrian-oriented signs that are mounted perpendicular to the sidewalk or placed at pedestrian eye level; 5.1a Example of a storefront that reflects the aesthetics of the business while being respectful of the overall building architecture.
  31. 31. APPENDIX

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