Jordan Rules 1 of 5

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Trouble viewing? Re-upload: http://bit.ly/WVMtA This is presentation 1 of 5; it goes over all 9 rules I created to help agencies create great user experiences. Rules 1 & 2 will be further explained in their own presentations. I'll also be going further in-depth on the other rules during presentations 4 & 5.

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Jordan Rules 1 of 5

  1. 1. The Jordan Rules <ul><li>9 Rules to ensure a good user experience </li></ul>v1.0
  2. 2. Rule 9 Test and adapt
  3. 3. 5 elements to test Layout Technology Messaging Interaction Audio
  4. 4. Layout button button V.S.
  5. 5. Technology V.S.
  6. 6. Messaging Submit V.S. Enter
  7. 7. Interaction button V.S. button
  8. 8. Interaction button V.S. button
  9. 9. Testing is a competency It’s important to follow best practices for testing. If you follow a sound methodology , you’ll derive great insights ; if you don’t, you’ll end up with misinterpreted insights.
  10. 10. Rule 8 Teach the user what he needs to know
  11. 11. Direct and Indirect Teaching Direct teaching: when you provide obvious instruction to the user. Indirect teaching: when you allow the user to learn through trial and error.
  12. 12. Direct Teaching
  13. 13. Indirect Teaching
  14. 14. Your approach depends on your audience Depending on who you expect to interact with your site, and the goals of your site; you’ll want to adapt your teaching approach to make the site easy to use and engaging .
  15. 15. Rule 7 Spend more time on IA and UX when using new technology
  16. 16. 5 types of new ‘technology’ New channel New media New platform New technique
  17. 17. New Channel or
  18. 18. New Media or
  19. 19. New Platform or
  20. 20. New Technique or
  21. 21. Plan to spend more time It’s important to allow more time for all stages of a project that makes use of new technology. Because UX planning and IA set the foundation for your project, it’s even more important to spend additional time in those areas.
  22. 22. Rule 6 Look at supporting visuals from a psychological perspective
  23. 23. Where is your eye drawn?
  24. 24. Where is your eye drawn?
  25. 25. Supporting visuals should support Visuals need to be on brand , interesting and relevant , but they also need to SUPPORT your message, and your goals . If your visuals aren’t helping to guide the user to a goal, they’re being under-used.
  26. 26. Rule 5 Prioritize user flows over information
  27. 27. Many web designers look at each page separately and create a hierarchy of information for each page. Creating a hierarchy for your user flows, looks at the objectives of the site and prioritizes information across the entire site.
  28. 28. By prioritizing your user flows, you’ll prioritize page content as a side-effect.
  29. 29. Rule 4 Write copy for skimming
  30. 30. 6 Spiderman Movie Facts James Franco originally auditioned for the role of Peter Parker, but director Sam Raimi decided to cast him as Harry Osborn instead. The hand sketching Peter Parker’s different costumes during the montage in the first “Spider-Man” movie in reality belongs to Infinite Crisis artist Phil Jimenez. Eliza Dushku, who co-starred with Kirsten Dunst in “Bring It On,” auditioned for the role of Mary Jane Watson and on the original “Spider-Man” DVD, during Tobey Maguire’s screen test, the actress reading Mary Jane’s lines was Dushku. The name of Peter’s landlord in “Spider-Man 2,” Mr. Ditkovitch, is a reference to Spider-Man co-creator Steve Ditko. The Spider-Man costumes cost upwards of $100,000 each to produce. Four of the valued costumes were stolen from the set of the original film and never recovered. Even a $25,000 reward for their recovery turned up no clues to the costumes’ whereabouts. Now a highly prized collectable, the original teaser poster for the first film featured the New York City skyline—including the World Trade Center—reflected in Spider-Man’s eye. Sony Pictures recalled all of the posters after the events of Sept. 11, 2001.
  31. 31. <ul><li>James Franco originally auditioned for the role of Peter Parker , but director Sam Raimi decided to cast him as Harry Osborn instead. </li></ul><ul><li>The hand sketching Peter Parker’s different costumes during the montage in the first “Spider-Man” movie in reality belongs to Infinite Crisis artist Phil Jimenez. </li></ul><ul><li>Eliza Dushku , who co-starred with Kirsten Dunst in “Bring It On,” auditioned for the role of Mary Jane Watson and on the original “Spider-Man” DVD, during Tobey Maguire’s screen test, the actress reading Mary Jane’s lines was Dushku. </li></ul><ul><li>The name of Peter’s landlord in “Spider-Man 2,” Mr. Ditkovitch , is a reference to Spider-Man co-creator Steve Ditko. </li></ul><ul><li>The Spider-Man costumes cost upwards of $100,000 each to produce. Four of the valued costumes were stolen from the set of the original film and never recovered. Even a $25,000 reward for their recovery turned up no clues to the costumes’ whereabouts. </li></ul><ul><li>Now a highly prized collectable, the original teaser poster for the first film featured the New York City skyline—including the World Trade Cente r—reflected in Spider-Man’s eye. Sony Pictures recalled all of the posters after the events of Sept. 11, 2001. </li></ul>6 Spiderman Movie Facts
  32. 32. Rule 3 Set expectations
  33. 33. Sign-up Sign-up Name Email Phone Number Address Sign-up Gender Country Credit Card # Occupation Sign-up Upload Photo Employer Employer Contact Marital Status Where would you drop off?
  34. 34. Sign-up Continue Name Email Phone Number Address Continue Gender Country Credit Card # (optional) Occupation Activate Upload Photo (optional) Employer Employer Contact (optional) Marital Status What about now? 3 Steps Step 1 Step 2 Step 3
  35. 35. What would you expect? Visuals need to be on brand , interesting and relevant , but they also need to SUPPORT your message, and your goals . If your visuals aren’t helping to guide the user to a goal, they’re being under-used.
  36. 36. Rule 2 Help the user find what he’s looking for *Note: Dedicated Presentation Required
  37. 37. Findability There is enough information on best practices, and examples of findability to create a separate presentation. In the interest of keeping this presentation to an hour; I’m not covering this rule completely.
  38. 38. How users find stuff <ul><li>Users generally find things in one of two ways: </li></ul><ul><li>Using a search tool </li></ul><ul><li>Browsing through links </li></ul>links search tool
  39. 39. Using a Search Tool The most important page to get ‘right’ for users who find stuff using a search tool is the SEARCH RESULTS PAGE (SRP, or SERP)
  40. 40. Browsing through links Setting up the proper user flows is key for users who browse the site through links.
  41. 41. Rule 1 Help the user figure out what he’s looking for *Note: Dedicated Presentation Required
  42. 42. What am I looking for? There are enough best practices, and examples of navigation hierarchy, types of navigation, and user flows to create a separate presentation. In the interest of keeping this presentation to an hour; I’m not covering this rule completely.
  43. 43. Next Steps I’m providing you with a checklist of the rules to use on your next project. I’ll be back next Wednesday with a dedicated presentation on Rule 2; and then the following Wednesday with one on Rule 1. - I’ll make those presentations available on SlideShare

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