Woman Warrior Oral Presentation

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Woman Warrior Oral Presentation

  1. 1. A Song for a Barbarian Reed PipeTheme<br />May 17th, 2010<br />
  2. 2. Preview<br />What is the theme<br />How is it demonstrated<br />Why Kingston chose this theme<br />How is it related to book title<br />How is it related to chapter title<br />
  3. 3. A Song for a Barbarian Reed PipeTheme<br />May 17th, 2010<br />
  4. 4. Theme<br />
  5. 5. a person should find his/her identity<br />Identity<br />
  6. 6. Theme<br />Identity<br />
  7. 7. Identity<br />a dilemma of Chinese-American who had “double identities”<br />
  8. 8. Identity<br />a dilemma of Chinese-American who had “double identities”<br />
  9. 9. Identity<br />a dilemma of Chinese-American who had “double identities”<br />Who you are with<br />Who you are<br />
  10. 10. Identity<br />a dilemma of Chinese-American who had “double identities”<br />Identity Crisis<br />
  11. 11. Comparison<br />
  12. 12. Some facts about Ts’ai Yen<br />She had actually been used to the life in barbarians.<br />She had two children there.<br />The Hsiung-nu leader really loved her and treated her well.<br />She actually had complicated feelings when she was told that she could leave, since she had been with her family for 12 years.<br />
  13. 13. Comparison<br />Kingston<br />
  14. 14. Comparison<br />Kingston<br />Ts’ai Yen<br />
  15. 15. Comparison<br />Kingston<br />double identities -> identity crisis<br />(loss of identity) <br />Ts’ai Yen<br />
  16. 16. Example 1 – Speaking<br />Kingston<br />
  17. 17. Loud<br />The boys who were so well behaved in the American school played tricks on them and talked back to them [in Chinese school]. The girls were not mute. They screamed and yelled during recess, when there were no rules; they had fist fights.<br />Kingston, 167<br />
  18. 18. Soft <br />Normal Chinese women’s voices are strong and bossy. We American-Chinese girls had to whisper to make ourselves American feminine. Apparently we whispered even more softly than the Americans.<br />Kingston, 172<br />
  19. 19. Example 2 – Language<br />Kingston<br />
  20. 20. Example 2 – Language (Culture)<br />Kingston<br />
  21. 21. Literary Feature—mixed language<br />I could not understand “I”. The Chinese “I” has seven strokes, intricacies. How could the American “I,” assuredly wearing a hat like the Chinese, have only three strokes, the middle so straight? Was it out of politeness that this writer left off strokes the way a Chinese has to write her own name small and crooked? No , it was not politeness; “I” is a capital and “you” is lower-case.<br />Kingston, 166-167<br />
  22. 22. Literary Feature—mixed language<br />The word for “eclipse” is frog-swallowing-the-moon.<br />Kingston, 169<br />
  23. 23. Literary Feature—mixed language<br />…or you had eaten moon cakes or long noodles for long life (which is a pun).<br />Kingston, 185<br />
  24. 24. Literary Feature—mixed language<br />That’s what we’re supposed to say. That’s what Chinese say. We like to say the opposite.<br />Kingston, 203<br />
  25. 25. Literary Feature—mixed language<br />It was more complicated (and therefore worse) than “dog,” which they say affectionately, mostly to boys. … The river-pirate great-uncle called even my middle brother Ho Chi Kuei, and he seemed to like him best.<br />Kingston, 204<br />
  26. 26. Literary Feature—mixed language<br />“You get reparation candy,” she said. “You say, ‘You have tainted my house with sick medicine and must remove the curse with sweetness.’ He’ll understand”<br />“See?” said our mother. “They understand. You kids just aren’t very brave.” But I knew they did not understand. They thought we were beggars without a home who lived in back of the laundry.<br />Kingston, 170-171<br />
  27. 27. Identity<br />Kingston<br />Comparison, Examples<br />Ts’ai Yen<br />
  28. 28. Why this theme<br />
  29. 29. Exemplify the consequence ofloss of identity<br />Crazy Mary<br />
  30. 30. Exemplify the consequence ofloss of identity<br />Crazy Mary<br />
  31. 31. Exemplify the consequence ofloss of identity<br />Crazy Mary<br />Pee-A-Nah<br />
  32. 32. Exemplify the consequence ofloss of identity<br />Crazy Mary<br />Pee-A-Nah<br />Kingston<br />
  33. 33. Quotation<br />I put on my shoes with the open flaps and flapped about like a Wino Ghost. From then on, I wore those shoes to parties, whenever the mothers gathered to talk about marriages.<br />Kingston, 194<br />
  34. 34. Exemplify the consequence ofloss of identity<br />If a person cannot solve his/her identity crisis, he/she might become a “crazy” person shaped by society.<br />
  35. 35. paronomasia<br />Insane people were the ones who couldn’t explain themselves.<br />Kingston, 186<br />
  36. 36. How related to woman<br />
  37. 37. Kingston emphasizes mainly Chinese-American girls.<br />How related to woman<br />
  38. 38. Kingston emphasizes mainly Chinese-American girls.<br />In ancient China, women are more likely to have identity crisis.<br />How related to woman<br />
  39. 39. Kingston emphasizes mainly Chinese-American girls.<br />In ancient China, women are more likely to have identity crisis.<br />How related to woman<br />
  40. 40. “A Song for a Barbarian Reed Pipe” symbolizes Kingston’s own writing, as Kingston and Ts’ai Yen face similar dilemma.<br />Title<br />
  41. 41. “the ending”<br />Here is a story my mother told me, not when I was young, but recently,…, the ending, mine.<br />Kingston, 186<br />
  42. 42. Summary<br />
  43. 43. Kingston used her own “tragic” experience as a Chinese-American female to show how hard the life will be if a person has double identities.<br />Summary<br />
  44. 44. Kingston used her own “tragic” experience as a Chinese-American female to show how hard the life will be if a person has double identities.<br />Kingston suggests that people, especially women, take identity crisis seriously and find their own identities, instead of only being driven by relation or society.<br />Summary<br />
  45. 45. Find out<br />who we are<br />
  46. 46. Source<br />Work cited: Kingston, Maxine Hong. The Woman Warrior. New York: Random, 1976. Print.<br />Book cover image: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Cover_womanwarrior.jpg<br />

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