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The Holography Times, June 2013, Volume 7, Issue no 21

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Dear Reader,

Welcome to the 21st edition of The Holography Times.

Today, in India more than 300 State level industry-trade association exist representing more than 7,00,000* companies.

Each and every product has an industry trade association formed with an aim to facilitate the business environment for its member companies.

While they are playing an important role in modern and global economies, there are various hindrances which affect their industry / sector growth. Product counterfeiting is one of them. It is affecting all categories of products, but the impact is very high in sectors / product categories like fast moving consumer goods (FMCG), pharmaceuticals, electronics, automobile and aircraft parts, music, publishing, software, telecom, cosmetics, personal care, beverages, etc.

To fight this menace, a few of trade associations have come forwarded and have started playing a proactive role. Although, the number is very low, we are hopeful that other industry association will follow up the examples.

Our current issue highlights the Role of Industry Association in Curbing Counterfeiting. Apart from this, the issue also covers, industry updates including news, patents, financial analysis and much more.

Do send us your feedback / critics at info@aspaglobal.com

With Regards,
C S Jeena
Editor

Published in: Government & Nonprofit
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The Holography Times, June 2013, Volume 7, Issue no 21

  1. 1. The Holography Times The Holography Times Vol. 7, Issue 21 Apr-Jun 2013 | Volume 7 | Issue 21 Endeavour to protect products and people combating counterfeiting ABMA American Bearing Manufacturers Association counterfeitscounterfeits counterfeitscounterfeits counterfeitscounterfeits counterfeitscounterfeits counterfeits SILK MARK counterfeitscounterfeits counterfeitscounterfeits counterfeitscounterfeits counterfeitscounterfeits counterfeits oppi WBA World Bearing Association International Electronics Manufacturing Initiative counterfeitscounterfeits counterfeitscounterfeits counterfeitscounterfeits counterfeitscounterfeits counterfeits SIA SEMICONDUCTOR INDUSTRY ASSOCIATION ICC Commercial Crime Services Helping business stay in business counterfeitscounterfeits counterfeitscounterfeits counterfeitscounterfeits counterfeitscounterfeits counterfeits trade associations become proactive HoMAI quarterly newsletter www.homai.org www.homai.org 1
  2. 2. The Holography Times Vol. 7, Issue 21 News Bytes 2 www.homai.org
  3. 3. The Holography Times Vol. 7, Issue 21 Viewpoint Dear Reader, Welcome to the 21st edition of The Holography Times. Today, in India more than 300 State level industry-trade association exist representing more than 7,00,000* companies of various sectors and trade. Each and every product has an industry trade association formed with an aim to facilitate the business environment for its member companies. While they are playing an important role in modern and global economies, there are various hindrances which affect their industry / sector growth. Product counterfeiting is one of them. It is affecting all categories of products, but the impact is very high in sectors / product categories like fast moving consumer goods (FMCG), pharmaceuticals, electronics, automobile, aircraft parts, beverages, etc. To fi ght this menace, a few of trade associations have come forwarded and have started playing a proactive role. It’s a good initiative and we are hopeful that more and more other industry association will follow up the examples. Our current issue highlights the “How industry associations helps in curbing counterfeits”. Apart from this, the issue also covers, industry updates including news, patents, fi nancial analysis and much more. Do send us your feedback / critics at info@homai.org. With Regards, C S Jeena Editor * Ministry of Corporate Affairs In this issue 4 News Bytes ABMA American Bearing Manufacturers Association oppi WBA World Bearing Association SILK MARK SIA SEMICONDUCTOR INDUSTRY ASSOCIATION International Electronics Manufacturing Initiative ICC Commercial Crime Services Helping business stay in business Combating counterfeiting: Trade associations become proactive 8 by C S Jeena Industry Updates Global Patents 14 Upcoming Events 15 www.homai.org 3
  4. 4. The Holography Times Vol. 7, Issue 21 News Bytes Maharashtra to introduce security holograms to curb illicit liquor Maharashtra: Excise department of Maharashtra is going to introduce security hologram on all liquor bottles manufactured in State by May. According to oficials, the department has decided to introduce security hologram as this will help them in certifying the originality of liquor, as well to deter and check duplication and adulteration of liquor. The state has been witnessing a growing number of issues related to duplication, adulteration and sale of illicit liquor. Since the past few years, the state has become an easy target for bootleggers bringing liquor in illegally from Goa, Daman and other neighboring states. With a surge in such activities showing a spike and liquor prices skyrocketing over the past two years, the concerned department has been mulling ways to curb the menace. “The security hologram will act as a tamper-proof seal and will be pasted on the bottle at the manufacturing facility itself” said Sanjay Mukherjee, Excise Commissioner. According to oficial of HOMAI (Hologram Manufacturers Association of India), “We appreciate the steps undertaken by the State excise department in their drive against illicit liquor. Security hologram are a mark of authentication that may be recognised by the public and in our opinion the common man in Maharashtra would have beneitted by the presence of a consumer veriiable tool like the hologram. In India more than 17 States UT are already using security hologram on liquor bottles. Mandated usage of security hologram in states like Uttar Pradesh, Tamil Nadu, Uttrakhand, Madhya Pradesh, Puducherry, Chhattisgarh, Kerala, etc. has not only minimized the tragedies due to spurious liquor but have also substantially increased the excise revenue collection by more than 25-30 per cent”. * # Figure: Holographic tax stamp used by various states and UT in India * State excise department stopped the usage of HEAL since November 2010. # Liquor prohibited states. Table 1: Comparison of state excise revenue receipts of maharashtra with few other states using holograms State 2002-03 (Accounts) 2012-13 Increase in turnover Population of (million) (Budget Estimates) over last 10 year State (2011) in Maharashtra 19386 94500 75114 112.3 Uttar Pradesh 25550 100682 75132 199.5 Tamil Nadu 21136 114739 93603 72.1 Karnataka 20941 107750 86809 61.1 Andhra Pradesh 18564 108200 89636 84.6 Source: www.mid-day.com HoMAI study on role of holographic excise adhesive label Reserve Bank of India: State Finances a Study of Budgets of 2012-13 (million) (million) (million) 4 www.homai.org
  5. 5. The Holography Times Vol. 7, Issue 21 News Bytes Zambia: Hologram arrival to boost piracy ight ZAMBIA: The holograms which will be afixed on audio-visual products are scheduled to arrive in the country next week. This came to light when Information and Broadcasting Services Permanent Secretary Amos Malupenga led a delegation to OPSEC, a UK based global company specialised in providing anti-counterfeit and brand solutions. OPSEC which has now completed the works was engaged by the Zambian Government to supply ive million holograms. The delegation was in Newcastle to undertake a pre - inspection of the hologrammes before shipment to Zambia. Mr Malupenga said Government was delighted that the problem of piracy that has been a perpetual issue will now be dealt with by the force it deserves. “Piracy continues to be a key challenge in the country and has been a major reason for the losses that the music and video production industry have continued to suffer on the market,” he said. He said the holograms will not only help enforcement agencies to check duplication and adulteration but will also help consumers in identifying original products. The permanent secretary said soon after the arrival of the holograms, the Government will set up a taskforce to oversee the implementation process of the security tags. Mr Malupenga further said that Government will launch an anti - piracy awareness campaign to sensitise the public on what the hologram is and how it works. Intellectual Property Specialist Kingsley Nkonde thanked the Patriotic Front (PF) government for inally bringing the hologram in the country. He said the hologram project was embarked on eight years ago by the previous administration, adding that he was glad that the PF government chose to priorities the project and complete it within a short period of time. OPSEC Marketing Manager Trevor Willis assured the delegation that the hologram was tamper proof. He explained that once afixed on audio-visual products and if a person attempted to remove it, it denigrates into pieces. Government announced plans in 2005 to afix a hologram, a security feature on audio-visual products in a bid to certify the originality of the works and curb the problem of piracy. – ZANIS. Source: www.allafrica.com Holopack-Holoprint becomes Holography The new name for Holopack-Holoprint UK: Holo-pack•Holo-print will open in Delhi with a new name: ‘Holography 2013’. According to Ian “ we are delighted to conirm that The Holography Conference will take place 7-9 November 2013 in Delhi, the irst time the event has been hosted in India. This is the only global conference for the commercial holography industry - and under its previous name of Holo-pack•Holo-print®, the conference has tracked every new development in holography since 1990. To relect the changing diversity in the holography industry, the event now becomes ‘The Holography Conference’ (or Holography 2013). Holography 2013 will examine and discuss all aspects of commercial holography and holographic technologies, in particular their traditional use in authentication and security, packaging and printing. Source: www.reconnaissance-intl.com www.homai.org 5
  6. 6. The Holography Times Vol. 7, Issue 21 News Bytes Payne introduced holosense A range of holographic inish range to enhances brand values UK: Payne has launched a range of holographic effect label inishes that offer a high impact and cost-effective means to integrate a high end inish to labels. The new HoloSense effects enable eye-catching holographic-type patterns to be added to label designs, enhancing on-shelf presence and consumer appeal. They help to achieve added depth to colours and create a sense of movement that attracts attention on crowded retail shelves. Part of Payne’s Inform product range, the HoloSense technology can be incorporated into existing labels or included as part of a new design. Five distinctive patterns are available for the surface inish - Diagonal Stripe, Raindrops, Kaleidoscope, Mini Lens and Checkerboard and these special effects can be used either as an all-over design or on selective areas of the label. HoloSense is the irst in a number of initiatives that Payne is taking in the development of label print technology which stimulates senses such as sight, touch and smell. It has been recognised that the incorporation of these types of enhancements can help to increase a brand’s impact by 70 per cent - crucial in highly competitive retail environments where consumers make more than half of their buying decisions at the point of purchase. As Payne’s managing director, Martin Dallas explains: “A label’s key role is to inform but this does not just mean practical information about a product. It is equally important that the label helps to create or relect brand image, raise consumer expectations and encourage purchase. It is for this reason that many of our customers are asking more of their packaging and looking at additional ways to create value and meaning for the consumer.” Source: www.payne-worldwide.com JDSU sees hike in currencies using anti-counterfeiting SPARK JDS Uniphase says it has doubled the number of currencies using its next generation anti-counterfeiting technology in the past year. At an analyst day last week, JDSU executives said 38 countries are using SPARK to protect their currencies, up from 17 one-year ago. JDSU views the use of SPARK by the recently redesigned €5 note as particularly signiicant. “It’s the lowest value note in the series, and it has adopted the latest generation technology. And what’s relevant about that is that today, the Euro only uses OVI on a €50 note and higher,” Luke Scrivanich, general manager of optical security and performance products at JDSU, said. OVI is the technology SPARK supersedes. South Africa previously used OVI for its three biggest bank notes, but has now incorporated SPARK into these bills. OVI is now used for the two lower denominations. SPARK is an optically variable pigment orientated by magnets for overt security. JDSU is looking to expand its anti-counterfeiting business beyond currency, with pharmaceuticals a possible target. Additional technology is needed to grow the pharmaceutical business, and an acquisition is one possibility. Source: www.jdsu.com 6 www.homai.org
  7. 7. The Holography Times Vol. 7, Issue 21 DeLaRue Time Line 6th Thomas De La Rue’s fi rst commercial venture was in 1813, February when he published the fi rst edition of le miroirPolitique 1813 newspaper in Guernsey. 1821 Thomas De La Rue moved to London and in 1821 set up as Printer, stationer and fancy goods manufacturer. 1831 De La Rue’s was formed in 1831 by Thomas De La Rue when it registered the ace of spades playing card produced using a revolutionary new typographical process ensuring uniformity in card manufacturing. 1840 De La Rue produced its fi rst adhesive postage stamp and in 1846 registered its patent for the fi rst envelope folding machine. 1853 Delarue awarded the contract to print adhesive fi scal stamp for the UK’s Board of Inland Revenue. The fi rst stamps to be surface printed. 1860 Secured its fi rst contract to print banknotes in Mauritius in 1860 for the Mauritius 10 shilling, £1 and £5 notes. 1914 De La Rue was commissioned to produce the £1 and 10 shilling notes for HM Treasury, the Company’s fi rst connection with the printing of sterling notes. However, De La Rue’s subsidiary, Portals Limited, fi rst produced currency paper for the Bank of England in 1724. 1947 By 1947 the Group was operating in over 60 countries worldwide and was listed on the London Stock Exchange. 1967 Jointly developed and installed the world’s fi rst ATM at Barclay’s De La Rue’s Chief Executive Oficer Mr Tim Cobbold said;“For any company to reach its 200th year anniversary is a signiicant achievement and we are particularly grateful to all the customers that have supported us over the past 200 years.De La Rue has a long history of innovation and as a part of continuing this rich tradition I was delighted that in December when the irst De La Rue polymer banknote was launched in Fiji, which is due to go into circulation in March.” Source: www.delarue.com Bank, in Enfi eld, London. 2003 Awarded the contract to print UK Sterling which was extended in 2009. 2011 Working on a tight timescale, De La Rue designed and printed currency for South Sudan, the world’s newest country, ahead of its independence later that year. 2012 Produced the 10 millionth new UK ePassport in November 2012. Member’s News DeLaRue celebrates its 200th anniversary Founded by Thomas De La Rue in Guernsey on 6th February 1813 One of world’s largest integrated commercial banknote printer, De La Rue celebrated its 200th anniversary on 6th February 2013. The Group involved in the design or production of over 150 national currenciesalso produces a wide range of security documents including passports, driving licences, authentication labels and tax stamps. In addition, the Group manufactures sophisticated, high speed cash sorting and inspection equipment. www.homai.org 7
  8. 8. The Holography Times Vol. 7, Issue 21 Cover Story Combating counterfeiting: Trade associations become proactive By C S Jeena Each and every product from a pencil to aircraft has a trade association formed with an aim to facilitate the business environment for its member companies. Today, in India more than 300 State level industry-trade association exist representing more than 7,00,000* companies. While they are playing an important role in modern and global economies, there are various hindrances which affect their industry / sector growth. Product counterfeiting is one of them. It is affecting all categories of products, but the impact is very high in sectors / product categories like fast moving consumer goods (FMCG), pharmaceuticals, electronics, automobile, aircraft parts, beverages, etc. To address this issue, various trade associations have come forward and are playing a proactive role in curbing this menace. This article highlights their activities and the role trade association can play in curbing this menace to a large extent. * Ministry of Corporate Affairs Introduction: Brand counterfeiting in India is not a new phenomenon. Brands are under attack in various forms such as counterfeiting,piracy, duplication, pilfering, tampering and adulteration of product. These attempts are nothing but an attack on the brand and hence a major risk to the value of the company. Brand attack has many ill effects, the key ones being; a) Reduces the brand value, customer’s conidence, market share and proitability of a company. b) The brand attacker, who supplies a duplicate or counterfeit product, does not pay any taxes. It is a loss to the collection of taxes for various governments. c) There are reports in the press mentioning that proits from suchil legal activities are going to terrorists and banned organisations. d) Counterfeiting also sometimes results in the unfortunate loss of human lives. Risk to the Brand must be taken with all seriousness The Government of India is doing its best in developing suitable laws, educating police force and judiciary to deal with litigation arising out of brand attack. However, legal process takes its own time and the attacks on the brand continue. As brands are amongst the most valuable assets of companies, industry association can play a vital role in providing effective information and advising proper anti-counterfeiting strategies to their members. 8 www.homai.org
  9. 9. Vol. 7, Issue 21 Cover Story The Holography Times Well, fi rst off all a trade association is a medium. A way to get in contact with companies in a certain industry. But also trade associations can advise their members, and play a role on behalf of their members towards governments. The ideal situation is when membership to an association is a guarantee to the quality and origin of a product. In that way, associations need to check and verify memberships. Director at Active Intelligent Packaging Industry Association Importance of industry association in curbing counterfeiting According to Eef de Ferrante, Director at Active Intelligent Packaging Industry Association, Well, irst off all a trade association is a medium. A way to get in contact with companies in a certain industry. But also trade associations can advise their members, and play a role on behalf of their members towards governments. The ideal situation is when membership to an association is a guarantee to the quality and origin of a product. In that way, associations need to check and verify memberships. Big trade associations such as FICCI, CII and ASSOCHAM have discussed and taken up the ight against the menace of counterfeit at various forums highlighting the loss to the brand owner, government, society and to consumers. There have been seminars and meeting with government for law enforcement. These are all useful initiatives, but, it is now imperative that the work done so far is taken up to a new level, keeping mind the fact, that in this ight there is also a need to continuously look for new innovative solutions and approach by each Brand owner/ company. Proactive steps Rather than wait and watch and then a reactionary step in ighting the menace, the associations ought to educate their members - Eef de Ferrante that Prevention is better than Cure, and they could consider taking the undernoted proactive steps to help their members protect themselves against the onslaught of counterfeiting. 1. Educating members about menace Association website can play vital role in educating its members through their website. For example, National Electrical manufacturers Association (NEMA) , USA has taken the menace very seriously and considered anti-counterfeiting as a matter of public policy and classiied an special section on anti-counterfeiting at their website. http://www.nema.org/ Policy/Anti-Counterfeiting/Pages/ default.aspx. Through this NEMA have started various services for its members such as anti-counterfeiting news, assistance to members, useful links etc. In India, FICCI, which is one of biggest industry associations, is working on same line and has recently formed a forum called Committee Against Smuggling and Counterfeiting Activities Destroying Economy (CASCADE) with an aim to generate awareness on the impact of these menace amongst consumers and citizens. The forum has launched a website www.icci-cascade.com (see igure1) which clariies various issues on counterfeiting. The website educates its member and consumer via industry news, awareness brochure, and discussion forum. The www.homai.org 9
  10. 10. The Holography Times Vol. 7, Issue 21 Cover Story website also updates latest and articles and best practices adopted by companies around the world against counterfeiting. According to Anil Rajput, Chairman FICCI CASCADE, “Counterfeiting and Smuggling are increasingly becoming a hugely lucrative business causing not only a great loss of revenue to the industry but also posing a serious threat to the security of the nation. As a result huge amount of investments goes in dealing with anti- social elements that is neither good for legitimate industry, for government nor for consumers. Efforts to counter this menace needs highest priority and calls for robust actions from all stakeholders”. 2. Educating consumers While educating the member companies lies under the responsibility of trade association, mass consumers can be educated in similar with the help of consumer’s organisation / associations. 3. Assistance to members in adopting authentication technologies Today, there are over 100 product security technologies (holograms, digital watermarks, DNA taggants, security inks, serialisation etc.) used by manufacturer to combat counterfeiting. Such solutions can be applied on the primary or secondary packaging. For an individual manufacturing company, it is challenging to understand the scope and eficacy of each of these technologies. The technology has to be understood, the right features have to be identiied, the cost of adopting the solution has to be looked as also the logistics affecting the deployment of the solution all across the markets that the brand is present in. Trade association can provide guidelines to their members in order to reduce this burden. For example, Association such as Organisation of Pharmaceutical Producers of India (OPPI) have prepared and uploaded anti-counterfeiting Fig1: Screenshot picture of FICCI website “Efforts to counter this menace needs highest priority and calls for robust actions from all stakeholders” 10 www.homai.org
  11. 11. Vol. 7, Issue 21 Cover Story The Holography Times guidelines for their members in order to help their members in establishing requirements that facilitate authentication and discourage counterfeiting (www. indiaoppi.com/publication.asp). Similar guidelines are also being provided by National Electrical manufacturers Association (NEMA), in USA (www.nema. org/Policy/Anti-Counterfeiting/ Pages/default.aspx) see igure2. 4. Sharing of best practices against counterfeiting Trade Association can provide and update best practices amongst each other as it is easier for them to collect information in comparison with member individual member companies. 5. Encourage member to consider brand protection as CSR They can ask each member to report to them and/ or in their annual reports to share holder, actions taken by them to mitigate risk to their brand that will also protect their consumers. This will be a good corporate governance practice and an excellent CSR. Such reports will strengthen Trade Association’s case for stricter law enforcement, as Trade Association can now irst show what their members have done and what they expect in turn from the law enforcement agencies. The excellent example set by GlaxoSmithKline can be seen at www.gsk.com/responsibility/. 6. Seminar / Exhibitions The Trade association can arrange seminars on counterfeiting and corporate responsibility. The target audience for this seminar should be CEOs, Heads of the companies and Brand Managers. Alongwith the conference there can be an exhibition of anti-counter feiting/anti-piracy technologies. Trade associations can take help of authentication technologies association in this regard. Fig2: Screenshot picture of NEMA website “Trade Association can provide and update best practices amongst each other” www.homai.org 11
  12. 12. The Holography Times Vol. 7, Issue 21 Cover Story S.no Name of Trade Association Country Initiative 01. National Electronics Manufacturers Association USA Anti-counterfeiting guidelines issued on their website for (NEMA) members. 02. Federation of Indian Chambers of Commerce India Portal launched on sensitising consumers against counterfeiting. 03. Organisation of Pharmaceutical Producers of India Anti-Counterfeiting guidelines issued on their website for India (OPPI) members. 04. Indian Cellular Association India Adopted anauthentication technology on their handsets and educated the consumers about the same through their website and mass media campaigns. 05. Silk Mark Organisation of India India Adopted an authentication technology on the products and educated the consumers about the same through their website and mass media campaigns. 06. Electronic Retailing Association USA Updating member on counterfeiting news. 07. European Semiconductor Industry Association Belgium Awareness against counterfeit products. 08. International Electro technical Commission Switzerland Anti-Counterfeiting guidelines issued at website for members. 09. International Electronic Manufacturing Initiative Global Investigating possible projects related to counterfeit (iNEMI) components. 10. Semi-Conductors Industry Association USA The SIA Anti-Counterfeiting Task Force (ACTF) is working on a variety of fronts to stop counterfeits from entering the market place. 11. Counterfeit Intelligence Bureau UK Developed the innovative counterfeiting seizure maps, the live seizure report, the news archive and the case study database. Table: Anti-counterfeiting initiative taken by some trade association 7. ISO Standards The International Standards Organisation has recently introduced a new standard, ISO 12931 titled ‘Performance criteria for authentication solutions used to combat counterfeiting of material goods’. This standard sets out the overall strategya brand owner should adopt to ight the menace of counterfeiting. These days ISO 9001 and ISO 14000 implementation are widely adopted. Associations of Industries that are prone to counterfeiting should take a lead in helping their members understand this standard and also implement this for the overall beneit of the industry. As a further initiative, the industry associations should also build an environment that respects intellectual property. Members should be encouraged to Patent their innovations so that they are able to reap the beneits of their research and development. In conclusions, it would be apt to say that an industry association is formed to serve the cause of its members at large and one of the greatest threats today to any successful products is the counterfeits and lookalike products. An industry association should look within and decide whether it is doing all that it can to protect its members. In case any industry association feels that it needs some additional information and advice, the Hologram Manufacturers Association of India will be more than happy to help in their endeavours to ight counterfeiting. Please feel free to write to us at info@homai.org. and Industries (FICCI) 12 www.homai.org
  13. 13. The Holography Times Vol. 7, Issue 21 ighting counterfeiting Established in 1926, National Electrical Manufacturers Association (NEMA), headquarter in Arlington, Virginia is world leading association of electrical equipment manufacturers. Representing more than 450 members the worldwide annual sales of NEMA-scope products exceed USD 120 billion. Its mission is “ As the voice for the electrical and medical imaging industries, NEMA is a pacesetting champion for safety, innovation, interoperability, environment, and market enhancement through advocacy, business information, and standards for products, systems, and technologies.” IN 2002, Several NEMA member companies began to recognize the growing presence of counterfeitelectrical products in markets around the world. These counterfeit products bear the unauthorizedtrademark of a genuine electrical manufacturer and the unauthorized mark of a certiication or testorganization. Some of them incorporate unauthorized, patented technology of NEMA members. NEMA’s anti-counterfeiting program helps its member companies understand and exercisetheir intellectual property rights. Because counterfeiting is a global problem that affects certiicationmarks as well as manufacturer brand names and trademarks, NEMA includes in its programsuch certiication organizations as Underwriters Laboratories and the Canadian StandardsAssociation. NEMA secured the participation of Canadian and Mexican tradeorganizations representing electrical manufacturers and carries on a dialogue with European counterparts as well. The NEMA Anti-Counterfeiting Coalition program has three main components: Education and training: This involves developing best practices to assist members in protectingtheir intellectual property and enforcing their legal rights, including working with customs and otherlaw enforcement authorities. It also requires networking with manufacturers and other trade groupsmutually interested in the counterfeiting problem. Documenting and publicizing the problem: NEMA prepares reports and press releases for distribution toinform the public about counterfeit electrical products. Public policy advocacy: Counterfeiting is an internationally recognized crime. It has been documented that counterfeitelectrical products present substantial health and safety concerns. NEMA is an advocate for greater publicresources devoted to combatting this crime, keeping counterfeit goods out of the marketplace, improving coordinationamong state and national governments, and strengthening law enforcement programs. For more visit www.nema.org Effective Efforts Figure : Ad campaign by NEMA www.homai.org 13
  14. 14. The Holography Times Vol. 7, Issue 21 Industry Updates Global Patents - Authentication Publication Title Int. Application Applicant / Inventor DD.MM.YYYY Class Number 13.03.2013 2567270 – Otpical authentication GO2B 5/18 11722750 Hologram industries component and method of fabricating said component Brief Abstract: According to one aspect, the invention relates to an optical authentication component visible in relection comprising an etched structure (23) on a support (20) of index n0, a thin layer (60) of a dielectric material of optical index ni different from n0 deposited on said structure (23), a layer (50) of a material of index n2 close to n0 encapsulating the structure (23) coated with the thin layer (60). The structure (23) exhibits a irst pattern (22) modulated by a second pattern, the irst pattern (22) being a bas-relief comprising a set of facets (24) whose shapes are determined so as to simulate a relief image of a relief object (10), and the second pattern (26) being a periodic grating determined so as to modulate the irst pattern (22) in order to produce, after deposition of the thin layer (60) and encapsulation of said structure (23), a irst colour according to a irst orientation of observation and a second different colour according to a second orientation of observation obtained by an azimuthal rotation of the component. 07.03.2013 WO/2013/030586- HOLOGRAM G03H 1/04 PCT/GB2012/052138 The secretary of state for business, innovation skills of her majesty’s britannic government Brief Abstract: A substrate includes a diffracting structure providing a hologram (20, 6). The diffracting structure encodes a holographic image so that thatholographic image is produced in response to reference light being incident on a major surface of the substrate at an angle of incidence with respect to the said major surface of the substrate, wherein the angle of incidence is no more than 20°. 14.03.2013 WO/2013/034603 - method and G07D 7/12 PCT/EP2012/067336 Bundesdruckerei gmbh arrangement for verifying a security document having a security feature in the form of a luorescent printing element and use of such an arrangement Brief Abstract: The invention relates to a method and an arrangement for verifying a security document having a security feature in the form of at least one pigment-like conversion phosphor which can be excited in a irst wavelength range of electromagnetic radiation to emit electromagnetic radiation in a second wavelength range, wherein the irst and the second wavelength ranges lie in the visible spectral range. The arrangement comprises a freely programmable mobile telephone having a light source for irradiating a check region of the security document with visible light in a irst wavelength range and have a photosensor for picking up visible light. The mobile telephone is conigured to compare the radiation emitted by the conversion phosphor in the second wavelength range and picked up by the photosensor with predeined data and to signal correspondence. 14.03.2013 WO/2013/033742 - method for B41M 3/10 PCT/AT2012/050125 Durst phototechnik increasing the counterfeit protection for digital technology an article gmbh Brief Abstract: The invention relates to a method for increasing the counterfeit protection for an article having a latent security feature, which article contains a substrate having at least one absorbent surface having a irst and a second area, wherein the irst area contains printing based on a irst printing scheme and optionally the second area contains printing based on a second printing scheme and the areas, if necessary, are handled on the basis of a method of handling, wherein the irst area does not differ visually from the second area, which means that the security feature does not appear, wherein the irst area differs from the second area such that when a liquid is put onto the areas the irst area differs visually from the second area even without a chemical reaction, which means that the latent security feature appears so as to be visible to the eye and, as the evaporation of the liquid increases, the visual differences become increasingly smaller until the two areas no longer differ visually from one another, which means that the latent security feature becomes invisible again. 14 www.homai.org
  15. 15. The Holography Times Vol. 7, Issue 21 Industry Updates Upcoming Events Date Event Name / Place / Website May 07-08 Asian Packaging Summit Singapore www.asiapackagingsummit.com May 21-23 Security Document World (SDW) 2013 Queen Elizabeth II Conference Centre, London, UK www.sdw2012.com June 03-05 4th Tax Stamp Forum Austria Trend Hotel Savoyen, Vienna, Austria, www.taxstampforum.com June 04-06 Total Processing Packaging Exhibition NEC, Birmingham, UK www.totalexhibition.com June 21-23 Print Expo 2013 Chennai Trade Centre, Chennai, India www.intelexpo.com July 05-08 Pack Plus South 2012 Hitex International Exhibition Centre, Hyderabad, India, www.packplussouth.in July 08-10 2nd Latin American High Security Printing Conference Bogota, Colombia www.cross-conferences.com August 28-30 Pack Print International 2013 Bangkok International Trade Exhibition Centre, Bangkok, Thailand, www.pack-print.de August 30-September 2 IPEX India 2013 Bombay Exhibition Centre, Goregaon (E), Mumbai www.ipexindia.com September 24-27 Label Expo Europe 2013 Brussels Expo, Belgium www.labelexpo-europe.com October 06-09 Pack Plus 2013 India Expo Centre, Greater Noida, New Delhi NCR, India www.packplus.in November 7-9 Holography 2013 The holography Conference Delhi, India 7-9 November 2013 December 03-06 Label Expo Asia 2013 Shanghai www.labelexpo-asia.com About HoMAI The Hologram Manufacturers Association of India (HoMAI) is the world’s 2nd and Asia only association representing hologram industry. PUBLISHED BY Hologram Manufacturer Association of India (HoMAI) EDITORIAL TEAM Issue Editor : C S Jeena Advisor : Mr. Pradip H Shroff Mr. Manoj Kochar Consultant : Mr. Sanjiv Singh PR Mantra sanjiv@prmantra.com Designed by : EYEDEA Advertising 1250/13, Govindpuri, Kalkaji, New Delhi-19 (India) eyedeaadvertising@gmail.com Printed by : Om Offset T-19, Okhla Industrial Area Phase-II, New Delhi-20 (India) The Holography Times is a quarterly newsletter published by HOMAI with an aim to provide latest developments, research, articles, patents and industry news to a wide audience related to Holography in Indian and World. The editorial team welcomes your news, contributions and comments. Please send your product updates, press releases, conference announcements or other contributions to HoMAI: 21-Ground Floor, Devika Tower 6 Nehru Place, New Delhi 110019, India Telfax: +91 (11) 41617369 Email: info@homai.org, Website: www.homai.org Disclaimer: The data used here are from various published and electronically available primary and secondary sources. Despite due diligence the source data may contain occasional errors. In such instances, HoMAI would not be responsible for such errors. Cover: Cover graphics displays the role of various trade association taking proactive steps to ight counterfeiting. www.homai.org 15
  16. 16. The Holography Times Vol. 7, Issue 21 16 www.homai.org

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