Getting started with
programming
University of Brighton, School of Education
– Purpose of study, computing programmes of study
“A high-quality computing education equips
pupils to use computational t...
– Purpose of study, computing programmes of study
“The core of computing is computer science, in
which pupils are taught t...
– Jan Cuny, Larry Snyder, and Jeannette Wing
“Computational thinking is the thought
processes involved in formulating prob...
– Jan Cuny, Larry Snyder, and Jeannette Wing
“Computational thinking enables you to bend
computation to your needs. It is ...
Computational thinking and programming
key stage 1
Subject content for KS1
Pupils should be taught to:
• understand what algorithms are; how they are
implemented as programs...
Algorithms
“understand what algorithms are; how they are
implemented as programs on digital devices; and that
programs exe...
Activity #1 Jam Sandwich Robot
In pairs, write an algorithm to program a robot to
make a jam sandwich.
Try to ensure your ...
Activity #2 Program a partner
One child ‘programs’ another child (who could be
blindfolded) to safely navigate an obstacle...
Debugging
“create and debug simple programs” - Subject content
KS1	

!
Debugging is the process of finding and correcting
e...
Logical reasoning
“use logical reasoning to predict the behaviour of
simple programs” - Subject content KS1
“Logical reaso...
Activity #3 A Simple Program
Program Roamer to draw a T shape. Plan the
sequence of instructions first using your cards. Wh...
Activity #4 Which program?
Which of the 3
programs will
produce the picture
shown here?
Activity #5 Using Repetition
What is the most efficient program that you can write
that will produce a rectangle? Use your ...
Subject content for KS1
Pupils should be taught to:
• understand what algorithms are; how they are
implemented as programs...
Computational thinking and programming
key stage 2
Subject content for KS2
Pupils should be taught to:
• design, write and debug programs that accomplish
specific goals, incl...
Decomposing problems
“solve problems by decomposing them into smaller
parts” - Subject content KS2!
Decomposition is the p...
Sequence, repetition &
selection
“use sequence, selection, and repetition in programs” - Subject
content KS2!
Sequence: pu...
Activity #1 Hour of Code
Working in pairs, follow the Hour of Code beginners
tutorial. Your challenge is to complete this ...
Debugging at KS2
“design, write and debug programs that accomplish
specific goals” - Subject content KS2!
This builds upon ...
Activity #2 Hungry Monkey 1
http://scratch.mit.edu/projects/23390939/
Can you make the monkey sprite move left and right
w...
Activity #3 Hungry Monkey 2
http://scratch.mit.edu/projects/23390750/
Can you make the monkey jump to catch the
bananas?
Variables
“work with variables” - Subject content KS2!
Variables are containers for data. They enable us to
store, retriev...
Activity #4 Hungry Monkey 3
http://scratch.mit.edu/projects/23390032/
Can you make the score board work to keep track of
t...
Inputs & Outputs
“work with […] various forms of input and output” -
Subject content KS2!
Hardware such as a keyboard, a m...
Activity #5 Inputs & Outputs
Can you make a controller for the Hungry Monkey
game using a MaKey MaKey and some playdough?
...
Controlling or simulating
physical systems
“design, write and debug programs that accomplish
specific goals, including cont...
Subject content for KS2
Pupils should be taught to:
• design, write and debug programs that accomplish
specific goals, incl...
Resources
There is a list of further learning
resources on the password
protected page on theSLATE.org
Evaluation
Please take a couple of minutes to complete our
simple online evaluation form:
http://goo.gl/DW8YPt
Thanks :)
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Getting started with programming

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Getting started with programming

  1. 1. Getting started with programming University of Brighton, School of Education
  2. 2. – Purpose of study, computing programmes of study “A high-quality computing education equips pupils to use computational thinking and creativity to understand and change the world.”
  3. 3. – Purpose of study, computing programmes of study “The core of computing is computer science, in which pupils are taught the principles of information and computation, how digital systems work, and how to put this knowledge to use through programming.”
  4. 4. – Jan Cuny, Larry Snyder, and Jeannette Wing “Computational thinking is the thought processes involved in formulating problems and their solutions so that the solutions are represented in a form that can effectively be carried out by an information-processing agent.”
  5. 5. – Jan Cuny, Larry Snyder, and Jeannette Wing “Computational thinking enables you to bend computation to your needs. It is becoming the new literacy of the 21st century.”
  6. 6. Computational thinking and programming key stage 1
  7. 7. Subject content for KS1 Pupils should be taught to: • understand what algorithms are; how they are implemented as programs on digital devices; and that programs execute by following precise and unambiguous instructions • create and debug simple programs • use logical reasoning to predict the behaviour of simple programs
  8. 8. Algorithms “understand what algorithms are; how they are implemented as programs on digital devices; and that programs execute by following precise and unambiguous instructions” - Subject content KS1! An algorithm is a sequence of precise and unambiguous instructions that are followed in order to achieve a specific outcome.
  9. 9. Activity #1 Jam Sandwich Robot In pairs, write an algorithm to program a robot to make a jam sandwich. Try to ensure your instructions are precise and unambiguous.
  10. 10. Activity #2 Program a partner One child ‘programs’ another child (who could be blindfolded) to safely navigate an obstacle course. This encourages the children to use precise, unambiguous instructions.
  11. 11. Debugging “create and debug simple programs” - Subject content KS1 ! Debugging is the process of finding and correcting errors in a computer program.
  12. 12. Logical reasoning “use logical reasoning to predict the behaviour of simple programs” - Subject content KS1 “Logical reasoning: a systematic approach to solving problems or deducing information using a set of universally applicable and totally reliable rules.”
  13. 13. Activity #3 A Simple Program Program Roamer to draw a T shape. Plan the sequence of instructions first using your cards. When you’re happy with your instructions, try them out on Roamer. If it isn’t right first time, debug your program by using logical reasoning. Extension: Can you program Roamer to draw an N?
  14. 14. Activity #4 Which program? Which of the 3 programs will produce the picture shown here?
  15. 15. Activity #5 Using Repetition What is the most efficient program that you can write that will produce a rectangle? Use your cards to plan your sequence and then test it out. Tip: You need to use a repeat command
  16. 16. Subject content for KS1 Pupils should be taught to: • understand what algorithms are; how they are implemented as programs on digital devices; and that programs execute by following precise and unambiguous instructions • create and debug simple programs • use logical reasoning to predict the behaviour of simple programs
  17. 17. Computational thinking and programming key stage 2
  18. 18. Subject content for KS2 Pupils should be taught to: • design, write and debug programs that accomplish specific goals, including controlling or simulating physical systems; solve problems by decomposing them into smaller parts • use sequence, selection, and repetition in programs; work with variables and various forms of input and output • use logical reasoning to explain how some simple algorithms work and to detect and correct errors in algorithms and programs
  19. 19. Decomposing problems “solve problems by decomposing them into smaller parts” - Subject content KS2! Decomposition is the process of breaking a problem down into smaller problems so that ultimately the bigger problem can be solved (and explained clearly to someone else or to a computer).
  20. 20. Sequence, repetition & selection “use sequence, selection, and repetition in programs” - Subject content KS2! Sequence: putting instructions in an order where each one is executed one after the other Repetition: one or more instructions are repeated a number of times or until a condition is met or the program is stopped Selection: instructions are executed depending on whether a particular condition is met Selection lies at the heart of the ‘intelligence’ of a computer program.
  21. 21. Activity #1 Hour of Code Working in pairs, follow the Hour of Code beginners tutorial. Your challenge is to complete this in 30 mins! http://learn.code.org/hoc/1 NB: This tutorial introduces the key programming concepts of sequence, repetition and selection
  22. 22. Debugging at KS2 “design, write and debug programs that accomplish specific goals” - Subject content KS2! This builds upon children’s experience of debugging at KS1. As their programs become more sophisticated the debugging becomes more challenging.
  23. 23. Activity #2 Hungry Monkey 1 http://scratch.mit.edu/projects/23390939/ Can you make the monkey sprite move left and right when the left and right arrow keys are pressed?
  24. 24. Activity #3 Hungry Monkey 2 http://scratch.mit.edu/projects/23390750/ Can you make the monkey jump to catch the bananas?
  25. 25. Variables “work with variables” - Subject content KS2! Variables are containers for data. They enable us to store, retrieve or change data. A variable could be used in a game to keep track of a user’s score or to remember a player’s name.
  26. 26. Activity #4 Hungry Monkey 3 http://scratch.mit.edu/projects/23390032/ Can you make the score board work to keep track of the number of bananas monkey has caught?
  27. 27. Inputs & Outputs “work with […] various forms of input and output” - Subject content KS2! Hardware such as a keyboard, a mouse, a camera or a sensor is used to input data to a computer. Outputs are the information produced by a computer system for the user. This information can be output via hardware such as a screen, a printer, speakers or a motor driven robot.
  28. 28. Activity #5 Inputs & Outputs Can you make a controller for the Hungry Monkey game using a MaKey MaKey and some playdough? If you weren’t able to complete the last Hungry Monkey challenge you can find a fully working version here: http://scratch.mit.edu/projects/23389956/
  29. 29. Controlling or simulating physical systems “design, write and debug programs that accomplish specific goals, including controlling or simulating physical systems” - Subject content KS2! Controlling physical systems could be explored through the use of kits such as LEGO WeDo. The Hungry Monkey game is an example of a simulation of a physical system.
  30. 30. Subject content for KS2 Pupils should be taught to: • design, write and debug programs that accomplish specific goals, including controlling or simulating physical systems; solve problems by decomposing them into smaller parts • use sequence, selection, and repetition in programs; work with variables and various forms of input and output • use logical reasoning to explain how some simple algorithms work and to detect and correct errors in algorithms and programs
  31. 31. Resources There is a list of further learning resources on the password protected page on theSLATE.org
  32. 32. Evaluation Please take a couple of minutes to complete our simple online evaluation form: http://goo.gl/DW8YPt Thanks :)

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