Healthy Families: Immunization

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health education program custom designed for health plan client, presentation with speaker's notes

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Healthy Families: Immunization

  1. 1. A Blue Cross and Blue Shield Federal Employee Program Health Education and Disease Prevention Initiative Flu and Pneumonia Prevention through Immunization The Healthy Families Program is a new BCBS Federal Employee Program Health Education and Disease Prevention Initiative. It will contain several topics that we believe will be relevant to you in managing your health and taking care of yourself. Immunization is one of these initiatives. Module 1: Immunization 1
  2. 2. Can any of you relate to this ? 2 How many of you had the flu last winter? (Come on…show of hands) So, I’m sure many of you can relate to Hank in this cartoon? To many, the flu can be a miserable inconvenience, but for some of you, it can develop into a serious, possibly life- threatening illness. Today, let’s talk about how to prevent that…. Module 1: Immunization 2
  3. 3. Introduction – Today’s Healthy Families Program will focus on the value of immunization – Individuals suffer yearly from symptoms caused by the flu tDiscomfort and Missed work tPneumonia, other serious illness, or even death (Read the slide above) Module 1: Immunization 3
  4. 4. Spheres of Care Adopt Healthy Behaviors Reduce Your Risks LEGEND Care for Your Chronic Conditions Health Promotion (Regular Exercise) Primary Prevention (Immunization) Secondary Prevention (Mammogram) Tertiary Prevention (Reduce Complications) Local Plans: Disease Management This Immunization module focuses on reducing the risk of illness. One of the 3 goals of the Healthy Families program. Module 1: Immunization 4
  5. 5. Flu Immunization Recommendations – All persons 50 years of age and older – Persons > 6 months of age with a chronic illness (e.g. asthma, CHF, COPD, diabetes mellitus) – Adults living in nursing homes and other long-term care facilities – Pregnant women – Persons 6 mo to 18 years of age receiving chronic aspirin therapy – Health care and home health providers – Employees at long-term care facilities – Students – Foreign Travelers – Anyone who wishes to reduce their likelihood of becoming ill from influenza During April of this year, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention released the Recommendations of the Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices for the prevention and control of Influenza. They recommended that individuals who fall into the following groups should receive immunizations against the flu…(read list) note: CHF (means Congestive Heart Failure) COPD (means Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease) Module 1: Immunization 5
  6. 6. Pneumonia Immunization Recommendations – All persons 65 years of age and older – Adults who have not received a vaccine within 5 years and were younger than 65 at the time – Adults with normal immune systems who have a chronic condition – Immunocompromised adults – Persons with HIV infection – Persons in environments or settings with increased risk – Children 2 years of age and older who have t no spleen t sickle cell disease t some kidney diseases t some spinal cord diseases or t HIV infection Pneumococcal disease may also cause pneumonia as well as several other more serious invasive diseases such as bacteremia, meningitis, and in children, it is also the most common cause of otitis media (ear infection). The same Advisory Committee recommends that individuals in any of these categories be immunized against pneumococcal infection. (Read the list). (Note: environments or settings of increased risk applies to the Alaskan Natives and some communities of Native American (Indians)) Module 1: Immunization 6
  7. 7. “Vaccination against influenza (flu) has substantial health- related and economic benefits for healthy, working adults.” Source: N Engl J Med 1995: 333:889-93 Flu shots are valuable to everyone. A New England Journal of Medicine Study notes that…(read slide) Module 1: Immunization 7
  8. 8. Young Families How does the flu affect me or my family members? People without Chronic Conditions – Among children aged 0 to 4 yrs the rate of hospitalization is approximately t 1,000 per 100,000 for babies younger than 6mo t 8 to 136 per 100,000 for children 2 to 4 yrs – Among children aged 5 to 14 yrs the rate of hospitalization is approximately 20 to 40 per 100,000 – Among people aged 15 to 44 yrs the rate of hospitalization is approximately 20 to 30 per 100,000 Source: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Epidemiology and Prevention of Vaccine-Preventable Disease. 6th Edition. January, 2000. At this point, you might still be asking yourself “ How does the flu affect me or my family?” Let’s discuss some basic facts about the flu (read slide) Module 1: Immunization 8
  9. 9. Young Families How does the flu affect me or my family members? People with Chronic Conditions – Among children aged 0 to 4 yrs the rate of hospitalization for flu is approximately 500 per 100,000 – Among children aged 5 to 14 yrs the rate of hospitalization for flu is approximately 200 per 100,000 – Among people aged 15 to 44 yrs the rate of hospitalization for flu is approximately 40 to 60 per 100,000 Source: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Epidemiology and Prevention of Vaccine- Preventable Disease. 6th Edition. January, 2000. And these hospitalization rates increase for people with chronic conditions…(read slide) Module 1: Immunization 9
  10. 10. Empty Nesters Why is flu immunization important to me? Flu Fact Sheet – Among persons aged 45-64 years without chronic conditions, the incidence of flu ranges from 20 to 40 per 100,000 – Among persons aged 45-64 years with chronic conditions the incidence of flu ranges from 80 to 400 per 100,000 – The flu vaccine is 50%-60% effective in preventing hospitalization – The flu vaccine is 80% effective in preventing death Source: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Epidemiology and Prevention of Vaccine-Preventable Disease. 6th Edition. January, 2000. Empty Nesters are those of you with college age or adult children, generally between the ages of 40 and about 60. In this group, we find that….(read slide) Module 1: Immunization 10
  11. 11. Empty Nesters Why is pneumonia immunization important to me? Pneumococcal Disease Fact Sheet – Common complication of influenza – Responsible for 36% of community-acquired adult cases of pneumonia – Responsible for 50% of hospital-acquired adult cases of pneumonia – May also cause meningitis and bacteremia which more often lead to death – Some forms of the immunization are 60%- 70% effective against invasive pneumococcal diseases Source: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Epidemiology and Prevention of Vaccine- Preventable Disease. 6th Edition. January, 2000. Now, let’s consider some facts about pneumococcal disease for this same group of adults we’re calling empty nesters….(read slide) Module 1: Immunization 11
  12. 12. Senior Adults/Grandparents Why is flu immunization so important? Flu Fact Sheet – Among persons aged 65 years and older the incidence of flu ranges from 200 to greater than 1,000 per 100,000 persons – The flu is responsible for > 90% of deaths among persons 65 years of age and older – The flu vaccine is 70%-90% effective among persons 65 years of age and older Source: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Epidemiology and Prevention of Vaccine- Preventable Disease. 6th Edition. January, 2000. The risk of serious illness due to flu increases with age. The group we call seniors and grandparent are those of you whose children have begun families of their own; generally, people age 62 or older. Let’s examine some basic facts about the flu and senior adults or grandparents... Module 1: Immunization 12
  13. 13. Senior Adults/Grandparents Why is pneumonia immunization so important? Pneumococcal Disease Fact Sheet – Responsible for 50% of hospital or institution-acquired adult cases of pneumonia – Fatality rate in elderly is higher than the 5%-7% for the general population – Fatality rate in elderly for bacteremia is approximately 30-40% Source: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Epidemiology and Prevention of Vaccine- Preventable Disease. 6th Edition. January, 2000. And the same holds true for pneumococcal disease (the risk of serious illness increases with age). Let’s examine some basic facts about pneumococcal disease and senior adults or grandparents…(read slide) Module 1: Immunization 13
  14. 14. I am still not convinced. • Myth: The majority of people who • Fact: In cases where outbreaks occur, 100% of individuals who have not been get flu and pneumonia have been vaccinated develop the disease, in vaccinated. contrast to the significantly smaller percent of vaccinated individuals who develop the disease because their individual biological and genetic factors prevented development of immunity • Fact: Most vaccine-adverse events are minor and temporary. More serious • Myth: Vaccines may cause harmful adverse events occur rarely (on the order side effects, illnesses, and even of one per thousands to one per millions of death. doses), and some are so rare that risk cannot be accurately assessed. • Fact: The Institute of Medicine in its 1994 report states that the risk of death from vaccines is “extraordinarily low.” Source: Centers for Disease Control & Prevention, National Immunization Program (Talking points to plan members dispelling myths about immunization) Some of you may have reservations towards immunization. Allow me to dispel some of the more common misconceptions. Answers to these common myths are provided by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Always check with your doctor to verify which immunizations are right for you and how often you must receive them. (Read slide) Module 1: Immunization 14
  15. 15. I am still not convinced. • Fact: It is true that vaccination has • Myth: Vaccine-preventable enabled us to reduce most vaccine- diseases have been virtually preventable diseases to very low eliminated from the United levels in the United States. States. However, some of them are still quite prevalent-even epidemic-in other parts of the world. Travelers can unknowingly bring these diseases into the United States, and if we were not protected by vaccinations these diseases could quickly spread throughout the populations causing epidemics here. • Fact: Additionally, the relatively few cases we currently have in the U.S. could very quickly become tens or hundreds of thousands of cases without the protection we get from vaccines. Source: Centers for Disease Control & Prevention, National Immunization Program (Talking points to plan members dispelling myths about immunization) (Read slide.) Module 1: Immunization 15
  16. 16. What can I do to protect myself? – Keep a written record of your immunizations and share it with your doctor. – Check with your doctor during your annual visit to find out if you need any booster shots. – Ask your doctor if you have any risk factors that require you to get additional immunizations. At this point I hope that I have you convinced. So now you might be wondering what can I do to protect myself ...(Read slide) Module 1: Immunization 16
  17. 17. Where can I get more answers to my questions? – Call Blue Health Connection at 1.888.BLUE.432 (1.888.258.3432) – Go online at http://www.fepblue.org – Call National Immunization Hotline 1.800.232.2522 – Go online at http://www.cdc.gov/nip/why.htm And if you have more questions you can have them answered at….(Read slide) Module 1: Immunization 17
  18. 18. Conclusion – Pneumonia poses a risk to many – Pneumonia is a complication of Influenza (flu) or Pneumococcal disease – Pneumonia can lead to serious illness or death – Pneumonia can often be prevented by immunization against Influenza (flu) and Pneumococcal disease I thank you for your time today. If you remember only one concept from what we’ve discussed today, let it be that life-threatening complications of the flu and pneumococcal disease can be prevented by getting immunized. I hope I’ve convinced you of that today. Module 1: Immunization 18

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