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Open Educational Practices: Serving Social Justice & Transforming Pedagogy

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Keynote address at the University of Kansas during Open Education Week on March 30, 2017

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Open Educational Practices: Serving Social Justice & Transforming Pedagogy

  1. 1. Open Educational Practices ServingSocial Justice& TransformingPedagogy University   Teaching  Fellow  &  Psychology  Instructor,  Kwantlen  Polytechnic  University Senior  Open  Education  Advocacy  &  Research  Fellow,  BCcampus Faculty  Workshop  Facilitator,  Open  Textbook  Network Rajiv  Jhangiani,  Ph.D. @thatpsychprof
  2. 2. “higher education shall be equally accessible to all”
  3. 3. 2.4 million low & moderate-income college-qualified high school graduates could not complete college (2001-10) The Advisory Committee on StudentFinancial Assistance http://files.eric.ed.gov/fulltext/ED529499.pdf
  4. 4. $2,000 $3,000 $4,000 $5,000 $6,000 $7,000 $8,000 $9,000 $10,000 1990 1992 1994 1996 1998 2000 2002 2004 2006 2008 2010 2012 2014 US  Higher  Education  Funding  -­‐ $/FTE State Funding Tuition Revenue http://www.sheeo.org
  5. 5. 0 200 400 600 800 1,000 1,200 1,400 1,600 1,800 1960 1965 1970 1975 1980 1985 1990 1995 2000 2005 2010 Hours  @  Minimum  Wage Hours  of  Work  Required  to  Afford  Tuition (University  of  Minnesota)
  6. 6. 1 Access codes • Eliminate no-cost alternatives • Eliminate low-cost alternatives • Create a direct link between the ability to pay and ability to get good grades
  7. 7. What  can  YOU  do? • Survey  your  student  body • #textbookbroke campaign • Presentations   • Utilize  visuals,  create  displays • Speak  directly  to  faculty  &  admin • Suggest  that  faculty  review  a  textbook • Showcase  examples • Form  a  student-­led  OER  group • Connect.  Collaborate.
  8. 8. #TextbookBroke
  9. 9. #TextbookBroke
  10. 10. Buy used (if possible) Buy online Resell (if possible) Rent Shared purchase (Inter)library loans Photocopy International edition Old edition
  11. 11. – University of Minnesota student “I figured French hadn't changed that much”
  12. 12. 66.5% Not  purchase  the  required  textbook 47.6% Take  fewer  courses 45.5% Not  register  for  a  specific  course 37.6% Earn  a  poor  grade 26.1% Drop  a  course 19.8% Fail  a  course €€€ €€€ €€ €€ € € Florida  Virtual  Campus.  (2016).  2016  student  textbook  and  course  materials  survey.  Tallahassee,  FL:  Author.
  13. 13. Revise Remix Retain Redistribute Reuse Source:  David  Wiley,    http://opencontent.org/blog/archives/3221 March  5,  2014,  CC-­‐BY open =  free  +  permissions
  14. 14. Source:  Creative  Commons,  2015  State  of  the  Commons  report
  15. 15. rijksmuseum.nl
  16. 16. ted.com ed.ted.com
  17. 17. rpsychologist.com
  18. 18. gutenberg.org
  19. 19. Not just free or low-cost textbooks Not just digital textbooks
  20. 20. openstax.org
  21. 21. open.bccampus.ca
  22. 22. nobaproject.com
  23. 23. Source:  Creative  Commons,  2015  State  of  the  Commons  report
  24. 24. open.umn.edu
  25. 25. "Opening  the  Curriculum:  Open  Education  Resources  in  U.S.  Higher  Education,  2014"by I.  Elaine  Allen  &  Jeff  Seaman,   Babson  Survey  Research  Group is  licensed  under CC  BY  4.0 80% 75%
  26. 26. Below  average 3% Average 20% Above  average 34% Excellent 43% HOW  WOULD  YOU  RATE  THE  QUALITY  OF  YOUR   OPEN  TEXTBOOK? Strongly  agree 6% Slightly  agree 12% Neither 17% Slightly  disagree 15% Strongly   disagree 50% WOULD  YOU  HAVE  PREFERRED  A  TRADITIONAL   TEXTBOOK? Jhangiani  &  Jhangiani  (2017)
  27. 27. HOW  IMPORTANT  TO  YOU  ARE  THE  FOLLOWING   FEATURES  OF  YOUR  OPEN  TEXTBOOK? 12.6 6.7 9.6 7.8 2.9 1 13.6 22.1 15.4 4.9 1 1.9 31.1 20.2 21.2 16.5 10.6 9.6 21.4 26 21.2 32 36.5 26.9 21.4 25 32.7 38.8 49 60.6 0% 10% 20% 30% 40% 50% 60% 70% 80% 90% 100% Shareability Permanent  retention Option  to  print Convenience/portability Immediate  access Cost  savings Not  important  at  all Of  little  importance Of  average  importance Very  important Absolutely  essential Jhangiani  &  Jhangiani  (in  press)
  28. 28. I  would  not  have  bought  the  text  book  for   this  course  because  it's  an  elective.  I   would  have  possibly  walked  away  with  a   C,  now  I  might  actually  get  an  A-­‐ It  is  easily  accessible   and  convenient.   Material  is  easy  to  understand   and  follow I  personally  really  like  the  convenience   of  having  the   complete  set  of  chapters  on  my  computer  and  even   accessible   from  my  phone  if  I  need  it.  I  like  that  I  don't   have  to  lug  around  another   text  book It's  free  and  it's  a  great  money  saver
  29. 29. 13 Peer  Reviewed  Studies  of  Efficacy http://openedgroup.org/  
  30. 30. 119,720 Students http://openedgroup.org/  
  31. 31. 95%  Same  or  Better Outcomes http://openedgroup.org/   openedgroup.org/review
  32. 32. Fischer  et  al.  (2015) • Quasi-­‐experimental  design • Propensity-­‐score  matched  groups • 16,727  students  taking  15  courses  at  10  institutions • OER  students: • Lower  withdrawal  rates • More  likely  to  pass  with  a  C-­‐ or  better • Higher  course  grades • Enrolled  in  more  courses  (current  &  subsequent  semesters) Fischer,  L.,  Hilton,  J.,  Robinson  T.  J.,  &  Wiley,  D.  (2015).  A  multi-­‐institutional   study  of  the   impact  of  open  textbook  adoption  on  the  learning  outcomes  of  post-­‐secondary  students.   Journal  of  Computing  in  Higher  Education,  27(3),  159-­‐172. doi:10.1007/s12528-­‐015-­‐9101-­‐x
  33. 33. Jhangiani  et  al.  (under  review) Jhangiani,  R.,  Dastur,  F.,  LeGrand,  R.,  &  Penner,  K.  (under  review).  Introductory  psychology   textbooks:  The  roles  of  online  vs.  print  and  open  vs.  traditional  textbooks. 0 10 20 30 40 50 60 70 80 90 100 Exam  1 Exam  2 Exam  3 Percent  Correct Traditional Open  Print Open  Digital p <  0.05 ns ns
  34. 34. “Mad” “Glad” “Sad” “Rad” Cost Completing  with  C  or  Better Student  Success  per  Dollar 0 100% $400
  35. 35. “Mad” “Glad” “Sad” “Rad” Cost Completing  with  C  or  Better Commercial Student  Success  per  Dollar 0 100% $400
  36. 36. “Mad” “Glad” “Sad” “Rad” Cost Completing  with  C  or  Better Commercial OER Student  Success  per  Dollar 0 100% $400
  37. 37. Commercial  vs.  OER Hilton  et  al.  (2016)
  38. 38. Cost  savings Access Outcomes Adapt,  update,  &  remix Enrolment Persistence Completion
  39. 39. "Recycling  Water  Bottles" by Mr.TinDC is  licensed  under CC  BY-­‐ND  2.0
  40. 40. Open  Pedagogy:   HOW Deeper  learning(Farzan &  Kraut,  2013) Evaluate  and  defend  credibility  of   sources  (Marentette,  2014) Write  more  concisely  and  think   more  critically  (Farzan &  Kraut,  2013) Collaborate  with  students  from   around  the  world(Karney,  2012) Provide  and  receive  constructive   feedback(Ibrahim,  2012) Enhance  digital  literacy  (Silton,  2012) Communicate  ideas  to  a  general   audience  (APS,  2013)
  41. 41. 22,000 37,000+ 97% Students  who  have  taken  on   Wikipedia  assignments  since  2010 New  articles  that  students  have   created Instructors  who  say  they  will,  or   plan  to,  teach  with  Wikipedia  again
  42. 42. Why  have  students   answer  questions  when   they  can  write them?
  43. 43. Students Topics Questions 35 10 1400
  44. 44. PM4ID
  45. 45. Free + Freedom
  46. 46. "GB  Airways  A320"by Tony  Evans is  licensed  under CC  BY-­‐ND  2.0
  47. 47. "IMG_1007"by Erica is  licensed  under CC  BY  2.0
  48. 48. @thatpsychprof Rajiv@kpu.ca slideshare.net/thatpsychprofWWW

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