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Upload folder 2961--english presentation

  1. 1. DifferenceDifference BetweenBetween American EnglishAmerican English AndAnd British EnglishBritish English
  2. 2. AMERICAN ENGLISHAMERICAN ENGLISH ►American English (AmE)American English (AmE) is the form ofis the form of English used in theEnglish used in the United StatesUnited States.. ►American English in itsAmerican English in its writtenwritten form isform is standardized across the U.S. (and in schoolsstandardized across the U.S. (and in schools abroad specializing in American English).abroad specializing in American English). ►American speech is somewhat uniformAmerican speech is somewhat uniform throughout the country, largely because of thethroughout the country, largely because of the influence of mass communication andinfluence of mass communication and geographical and social mobility in the Unitedgeographical and social mobility in the United StatesStates
  3. 3. BRITISH ENGLISHBRITISH ENGLISH ►British English (BrE)British English (BrE) is the form of Englishis the form of English used in theused in the United KingdomUnited Kingdom and the rest of theand the rest of the British IslesBritish Isles. It includes all English. It includes all English dialectsdialects usedused within the British Isles.within the British Isles. ►British English has a reasonable degree ofBritish English has a reasonable degree of uniformity in its formal written form. On theuniformity in its formal written form. On the other hand, the forms ofother hand, the forms of spokenspoken English –English – dialects and vocabulary – used across thedialects and vocabulary – used across the British Isles vary considerably more than inBritish Isles vary considerably more than in most other English-speaking areas of the world.most other English-speaking areas of the world.
  4. 4. Historical backgroundHistorical background ►TheThe English languageEnglish language was first introduced towas first introduced to thethe AmericasAmericas byby BritishBritish, beginning in the late, beginning in the late 16th century16th century. Similarly, the language spread to. Similarly, the language spread to numerous other parts of the world as a result ofnumerous other parts of the world as a result of British colonization elsewhere and the spreadBritish colonization elsewhere and the spread of the former British Empire, which, by 1921,of the former British Empire, which, by 1921, held sway over a population of about 470–570held sway over a population of about 470–570 million people: approximately a quarter of themillion people: approximately a quarter of the world's population.world's population.
  5. 5. PRONUNCIATIONPRONUNCIATION ► GRAMMARGRAMMAR 1.1. SINGULAR AND PLURAL FOR NOUNS:SINGULAR AND PLURAL FOR NOUNS: For Example, In British "the team are worried";For Example, In British "the team are worried"; American "the team is worried". AmericansAmerican "the team is worried". Americans may use the plural form when the individualmay use the plural form when the individual membership is clear, for example, "the teammembership is clear, for example, "the team take their seats" (not "the team takes its seattake their seats" (not "the team takes its seat (s)”, although it is almost always rephrased to(s)”, although it is almost always rephrased to avoid the singular/plural decision, as in "theavoid the singular/plural decision, as in "the team members take their seats".team members take their seats".
  6. 6. 2.2. PHRASEL VERBS:PHRASEL VERBS: ►In the U.S., forms are usually but not invariablyIn the U.S., forms are usually but not invariably filled outfilled out, but in Britain they can also be, but in Britain they can also be filled infilled in.. However, in reference to individual parts of aHowever, in reference to individual parts of a form, Americans may also useform, Americans may also use inin ("fill in the("fill in the blanks"). In AmE the direction "fill it all in"blanks"). In AmE the direction "fill it all in" (referring to the form as a collection of blanks,(referring to the form as a collection of blanks, perhaps) is as common as "fill it all out."perhaps) is as common as "fill it all out."
  7. 7. 3.3. USE OF TENSES:USE OF TENSES: ►British uses the present perfect tense to talkBritish uses the present perfect tense to talk about an event in the recent past and with theabout an event in the recent past and with the wordswords alreadyalready,, justjust andand yet.yet. In American usage,In American usage, these meanings can be expressed with thethese meanings can be expressed with the present perfect (to express a fact) or the simplepresent perfect (to express a fact) or the simple past (to imply an expectation). This Americanpast (to imply an expectation). This American style has become widespread only in the paststyle has become widespread only in the past 20 to 30 years; the "British" style is still in20 to 30 years; the "British" style is still in common use as well.common use as well.  "I've just got(ten) home." / "I just got home.""I've just got(ten) home." / "I just got home."  "I've already eaten." / "I already ate.""I've already eaten." / "I already ate."
  8. 8. 4.4. DIFFERENTDIFFERENT PREPOSITIONS INPREPOSITIONS IN DIFFERENT CONTEXTS:DIFFERENT CONTEXTS:► In the United States, the wordIn the United States, the word throughthrough can mean "up tocan mean "up to and including" as inand including" as in Monday through FridayMonday through Friday. In the UK. In the UK Monday to FridayMonday to Friday, or, or Monday to Friday inclusiveMonday to Friday inclusive is usedis used instead;instead; Monday through to FridayMonday through to Friday is also sometimesis also sometimes used.used. ► In AmE, one always speaks of the streetIn AmE, one always speaks of the street onon which anwhich an address is located, whereas in BrEaddress is located, whereas in BrE inin can also be usedcan also be used in some contexts.in some contexts. InIn suggests an address in a citysuggests an address in a city street, so a service station (or a tourist attraction orstreet, so a service station (or a tourist attraction or indeed a village) would always beindeed a village) would always be onon a major road, buta major road, but a department store might bea department store might be inin Oxford Street.Oxford Street.
  9. 9. MISCELLANEOUSMISCELLANEOUS GRAMMATICAL DIFFERENCEGRAMMATICAL DIFFERENCE ►In names of American rivers, the wordIn names of American rivers, the word riverriver usually comes after the name (for example,usually comes after the name (for example, Colorado RiverColorado River), whereas for British rivers it), whereas for British rivers it comes before (as incomes before (as in River ThamesRiver Thames).). ►In most areas of the United States, the wordIn most areas of the United States, the word withwith is also used as an adverb: "I'll come with"is also used as an adverb: "I'll come with" instead of "I'll come along". However, in someinstead of "I'll come along". However, in some British Dialects, 'come with' is used as anBritish Dialects, 'come with' is used as an abbreviation of 'come with me', as in "I'm goingabbreviation of 'come with me', as in "I'm going to the office - come with" instead of "I'm goingto the office - come with" instead of "I'm going to the office - come with me".to the office - come with me".
  10. 10. REFERENCESREFERENCES ►Hargreaves, Orin (2003).Hargreaves, Orin (2003). Mighty Fine WordsMighty Fine Words and Smashing Expressionsand Smashing Expressions. Oxford: Oxford. Oxford: Oxford University Press. ISBN 0-19-515704-4University Press. ISBN 0-19-515704-4 ►McArthur, Tom (2002).McArthur, Tom (2002). The Oxford Guide toThe Oxford Guide to World EnglishWorld English. Oxford: Oxford University Press.. Oxford: Oxford University Press. ISBN 0-19-866248-3.ISBN 0-19-866248-3. ►Peters, Pam (2004).Peters, Pam (2004). The Cambridge Guide toThe Cambridge Guide to English UsageEnglish Usage. Cambridge: Cambridge. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press. ISBN 0-521-62181-X.University Press. ISBN 0-521-62181-X.

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