Culture and Creative Industries in Australia

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Presentation to 3rd China Trade in Services Congress, Beijing, China, 1-3 June, 2011

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Culture and Creative Industries in Australia

  1. 1. Culture and Creative Industries inAustralia Terry Flew, ARC Centre of Excellence for Creative Industries and Innovation, Queensland University of Technology, Brisbane, Australia Presentation to 3rd China Trade in Services Congress, Beijing, China, June 1-3, 2011
  2. 2. Origins of Australian Creative Industries in1990s Creative Nation cultural policy•  This cultural policy is also an economic policy. Culture creates wealth ... [and] adds value, it makes an essential contribution to innovation, marketing and design. It is a badge of our industry. The level of our creativity substantially determines our ability to adapt to new economic imperatives. It is a valuable export in itself and an essential accompaniment to the export of other commodities. It attracts tourism and students. It is essential to our economic success. (Creative Nation, 1994)
  3. 3. Creative Industries Sectors1.  Advertising, Graphic Design and Marketing;2.  Architecture, Visual Arts and Design;3.  Film, Television and Entertainment Software;4.  Music Composition and Publishing;5.  Performing Arts;6.  Writing, Publishing and Print Media.
  4. 4. Creative Trident•  Specialist creatives (cultural occupation/ cultural industry•  Embedded creatives (cultural occupation/ non-cultural industry•  Support activities (non-cultural occupation/cultural industry 4
  5. 5. Australian creative workforce - usingcreative trident Source: Higgs, Cunningham and Pagan 2007. 5
  6. 6. Sectoral composition- employment Source: Higgs, Cunningham and Pagan 2007 6
  7. 7. Value of Australian CIs -using creative trident Source: Higgs, Cunningham and Pagan 2007. 7
  8. 8. Australian CIs as industry share, 2006
  9. 9. CI growth by sector, Australia, 1996-2007
  10. 10. Australia’s GDP Growth, 1995-2010 !
  11. 11. Australia’s terms of trade, 1995-2010 !
  12. 12. Internet and digital media technologies Mass  communica+ons  media   Convergent  social  media  (21st   (20th  century)   century)  Media   Large-­‐scale;  high  barriers  to   Internet  drama,cally  reduces  distribu,on   entry   barriers  to  entry  Media   Complex  division  of  labour;   Easy-­‐to-­‐use  Web  2.0  produc,on   media  content  gatekeepers;     technologies;  mul,-­‐skilling;  small   professional  ideologies   collabora,ve  teams  Media  power   One  way  communica,ons  flow   Greater  empowerment  of  users/ audiences  Media  content   Tendency  towards   ‘Long  tail’  economics;  de-­‐ standardised  mass  appeal   massifica,on  and  segmenta,on   content  to  maximise  audience   of  media  content  markets   share  Producer/ Impersonal,  anonymous  and   Poten,al  to  be  more  personalised  consumer   commodi,sed  (audiences  as   and  user-­‐driven  (user  created  rela,onship   target  mass  market)   content  –  UCC)  
  13. 13. The new cultural policy•  Governments have searched for ways to surf the wave of the new information economy, looking to the creative industries broadly defined as sources of innovation to feed economic growth and employment creation at both national and local levels … [enabling] the arts [to] be seen as part of a wider and more dynamic sphere of economic activity, with links through to the information and knowledge economies, fostering creativity, embracing new technologies and feeding innovation (David Throsby, 2008).

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