Lincoln: The Constitution and the Civil War

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Lincoln: The Constitution and the Civil War, a traveling exhibition for libraries, was organized by the National Constitution Center and the American Library Association Public Programs Office. The traveling exhibition has been made possible by a major grant from the National Endowment for the Humanities. Lincoln: The Constitution and the Civil War is based on an exhibition of the same name developed by the National Constitution Center.

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Lincoln: The Constitution and the Civil War

  1. 1. Lincoln: The Constitution and the Civil War Exhibition on View at the Harris County Public Library Lone Star College-CyFair Branch December 28, 2011 – February 17, 2012 Additional support from the Lone Star College-CyFair Branch Friends of the Library
  2. 2. “ THE UNION IS DISSOLVED!” Charleston Mercury Extra, December 20, 1860. Courtesy of Library of Congress, Rare Book & Special Collections Division “ Charleston Mercury Extra: Passed unanimously at 1:15 o’clock, p.m., December 20, 1860. An ordinance to dissolve the Union. . . .” [Charleston, South Carolina, 1860]
  3. 3. Bible used at Lincoln’s swearing-in, 1861. Courtesy of Library of Congress, Rare Book & Special Collections Division The Bible was originally purchased by William Thomas Carroll, Clerk of the Supreme Court, for Lincoln’s swearing-in ceremony on March 4, 1861.
  4. 4. Attack on Union troops, Baltimore. Currier and Ives lithograph, 1861. Image Courtesy of Library of Congress, Prints & Photographs Division A mob’s attack on Union troops in Baltimore in the earliest days of the war prompted Lincoln to suspend the writ of habeas corpus and declare martial law.
  5. 5. President Abraham Lincoln. Image Courtesy of Library of Congress, Prints & Photographs Division This portrait was used as a model for the engraved bust of Abraham Lincoln that appeared on the United States five dollar bill for many years.
  6. 6. Union army recruitment broadside, 1863. Image Courtesy of the Library Company of Philadelphia From the beginning of the war, blacks clamored to enlist in the Union army. After 1863, they were permitted to do so. By the end of the war, nearly 190,000 black troops had risked their lives for the Union.
  7. 7. Secession vs. Union illustration, Harper’s Weekly, 1863. Image Courtesy of Library of Congress, Prints & Photographs Division Secession raised fundamental questions about what sort of nation the Constitution had created. Were the states sovereign, or were the people? Ultimately the war decided the question.
  8. 8. The Gettysburg Address. Owned by John George Nicolay, Lincoln’s private secretary. Courtesy of Library of Congress, Prints & Photographs Division The Gettysburg Address was delivered by President Lincoln in Gettysburg, Pennsylvania, at the dedication of a national military cemetery on November 19, 1863.
  9. 9. President Abraham Lincoln, February 5, 1865. Image Courtesy of Library of Congress, Prints & Photographs Division This photograph was taken in Washington, D.C., on February 5, 1865, one month before Lincoln delivered his Second Inaugural Address.
  10. 10. Abraham Lincoln (center of photo) delivering his second inaugural address as President of the United States, Washington, D.C., March 4, 1865. Image Courtesy of Library of Congress, Prints & Photographs Division
  11. 11. Panoramic view of East Cemetery Hill, Gettysburg, 1909. Image Courtesy of Library of Congress, Prints & Photographs Division
  12. 12. Panoramic view of East Cemetery Hill, Gettysburg, 2007. Image Courtesy of Dennis MacDonald and World of Stock
  13. 13. Lincoln: The Constitution and the Civil War , a traveling exhibition for libraries, was organized by the National Constitution Center and the American Library Association Public Programs Office. The traveling exhibition has been made possible by a major grant from the National Endowment for the Humanities. Lincoln: The Constitution and the Civil War is based on an exhibition of the same name developed by the National Constitution Center.

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